RSVP Volunteers in Healthy Futures and Education


Uploaded by serviceresources on 05.11.2012

Transcript:
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Hello, everyone.
Welcome to Healthy Futures focus area for RSVP.
First, I would like to go over a few housekeeping items.
Please use your computer speakers for audio.
If you're having a hard time hearing me, please check to make sure that your speakers are turned up.
Also, you can select closed captioning; it's available on the left-hand side at the bottom.
If you have a question, please click the green "Q&A" button on the lower left-hand corner of your screen.
If you have a technical question, that will be answered by Campaign Consultation.
But we will answer any content questions throughout the presentation.
We have a few designated times.
But feel free to submit questions throughout.
We will also collect all questions and answer any that we don't get to you in the forum.
You can access the forum once again, on the bottom left-hand side of your screen under "Content."
And also in the content section you can access files and that will also have the PowerPoint if you would
like to access the PowerPoint.
Over the next half hour, we are going to review three work plans to decide if they can be adapted to align
with the new Healthy Futures performance measures.
Using RSVP performance measure instructions found in the RSVP competition NOFO appendix B we will explore
how current launch activities can demonstrate impact in Healthy Futures.
Finally, like I said, there will be time for question and answer.
The Healthy Futures Focus Area notes that grants will meet health needs in communities including access to
care, aging in place, and addressing childhood obesity.
Grant activities will increase senior's ability to remain in their own homes with same
or improved quality of life for as long as possible.
Increase physical activity and improve nutrition and use with the purpose of with the purpose of reducing
childhood obesity and increasing access to nutritious food and improve access to primary and preventative
healthcare for communities served by CNCS-supported programs.
An RSVP project would like to identify Healthy Futures as their primary focus area.
They have a total of 800 unduplicated volunteers.
Using the RSVP performance measure instructions, we're going to review three current work plans
and determine if they're a fit.
We're not looking at the language to ensure that it specifically fits.
What we're looking for is trying to determine if we can adapt it to fit with the new performance measures.
First, we're going to explore strategic plan objectives 1 for Healthy Futures,
Aging in Place.
The outputs for this measure are H8.
The number of homebound or older adults and individuals with disabilities receiving food,
transportation, or other services that allow them to live independently.
And H13, the number of caregivers of homebound or older adults
and individuals with disabilities receiving respite services.
The first work plan we're going to review is one in which RSVP volunteers support older veterans living in
four wards of the George Washington VA Medical Center.
The current output that the RSVP program has is veterans age 55
and over will receive daily visits and support from RSVP volunteers.
The current outcome of the project is using is at 75% of participating veterans
will report they feel less depression.
Once again, the current output is 150 veterans age 55 and over will receive daily visits
and support from RSVP volunteers.
The Healthy Futures output measure is the number of homebound or older adults and individuals with
disabilities receiving food, transportation, or other services that allow them to live independently.
So now we're going to do a poll.
And once again, I remind you that we're looking to see if it can be adapted to fit.
Using the poll, please tell us what you think.
Does this work plan align with the output measure H8?
To review, the current output is 150 veterans at the VA hospital will receive daily visits
and support from RSVP volunteers.
The Healthy Futures output measure H8 is the number of homebound or older adults and individuals with
disabilities receiving food, transportation, or other services that allow them to live independently.
So I'm going to wait about 15 seconds and then we're going to explore definitions to see what the answer is.
Okay, we're going to move on.
And if you have already answered the poll, you can close it by clicking the X by clicking close on it to
see the next slide.
So we're just going to go over some definitions to explore whether this work plan can fit with a specific
measure that we're discussing right now.
Once again, measure H8 uses several terms.
They use the term homebound, individual with a disability receiving food,
transportation and other services and live independently.
Let's explore the meaning of these terms.
Homebound, individuals unable to leave their personal residence due to disability,
injury or age.
It may be a short-term or long-term need.
For example, an individual may have broken a hip that prevents them from driving for a few months.
But after the injury has healed, they no longer require help to live independently.
Next, individual with a disability is an individual who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially
limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such an impairment
or is regarded as having such an impairment.
Receiving food, transportation or other services,
the individual should receive the support needed to maintain independent living.
Not all individuals will require the same supports.
This may include food deliveries, legal, and medical services,
nutrition information, transportation, etc.
And finally, the definition does include the term "live independently."
Individuals live in a private residence, house, apartment,
mobile home, rather than an assisted living facility, nursing home or group home.
According to the poll, we're pretty equally divided.
About 50% of you think it can fit, and close to 50% think that it can't.
So let's explore what the answer is.
Based on the specific measure that we're looking at, no,
it does not fit Aging in Place.
So let's explore why it doesn't fit Aging in Place.
First, the definition of homebound includes individuals unable to leave their personal residence.
The clients served in this case are in institutions, not a personal residence.
Second, the definition of receiving food, transportation,
or other services includes the statement that individuals should receive
the supports needed to maintain independent living.
The activities in this example are not fostering independent living.
Third, live independently is defined as individuals live in a private residence,
house, apartment, mobile home, etc, rather than in an assisted living facility,
nursing home or group home.
So right now I think we're going to pause for questions.
So if anybody has a question, they can submit it, like I said,
using the green button on the bottom left-hand side of your screen that says "Q&A."
>> Tarah Maners: And I do have some questions coming in.
The first one is: Does the independent work plan apply to homebound or older adults or individuals with
disabilities or does it apply to homebound or older adults with disabilities
and individuals with disabilities?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay. That's a good question.
The language can be a little bit confusing.
So let's explore that a little bit.
When it says -- I mean, I think the definitions kind of clarify.
It says homebound includes individuals unable to leave their personal residence.
But then I know the work plan or the measure does say something about
"or older adults or individuals with disabilities."
But I think the other definition to explore in this case is the definition of receiving food,
transportation, or other services.
At the conclusion, it says the activities -- it says,
"Individuals should receive the supports needed to maintain independent living."
So if somebody is in a hospital where they're most likely to remain until they pass away,
it's not really fostering independent living.
So it wouldn't meet the definition of receiving the food,
transportation, or other services that enable them to live independently.
>> Tarah Maners: And another question is: Please define older adults?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: I don't think it's limited to older adults.
So if we look at the measure H8 -- because I don't think that definition is included in our instructions.
But if we look at the measure H8, the number of homebound or older adults and individuals with
disabilities recieving food, transportation, or other services.
So we're not limited to serving just older adults.
So you could have an individual with a disability or that has been injured that needs some assistance that
will help enable them to stay in their home and live independently.
So I don't know if that definition is all inclusive.
But it would seem older adults refers to 55 and older.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay, and should we do one more question?
Do older adults living in an independent living residence not assisted living qualify?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: That is a good question.
I'm going to take note of that.
I think we'll get back to you and answer that in the forum.
Okay, so I think we can move on.
Again, we will have more time for questions later on.
And like I said, about the question that I just received,
that I want to look into before answering, we also will be answering questions in the forum.
Okay, so as we discussed, this activity does not align with Healthy Futures.
One option for the program would be to include the work plan and their community priorities.
And please note also that the program can report on veterans served in the demographic section of the
progress report and in the annual progress report supplement.
Next, we're going to review the Healthy Futures strategic plan objective 2,
food security.
The output measures within the work plan are H10.
The number of individuals receiving emergency food from food banks,
food pantries, or other nonprofit organizations.
And H11, the number of individuals receiving support, services,
education and/or referrals to alleviate long-term hunger.
The corresponding outcome for food security is H12.
The number of individuals that report an increased food security of themselves and their children as a result
of CNCS supported services.
So the work plan we're going to explore is a project that is serving three community garden locations where
they register, train, and support participants in the garden.
They have 65 unduplicated volunteers serving in this area.
The output is 390 participants are educated on sustaining and growing healthy organic vegetables.
The outcome is 60% of participants report that the vegetables grown help them meet their basic food needs.
So once again, just kind of at first glance we would like to see what you think.
Does the Community Garden work plan align with Healthy Futures measure H11?
To review, the current output is 390 participants are educated on sustaining
and growing healthy organic vegetables.
Does this fit the output measure -- number of individuals receiving
support, services, education and/or referrals to alleviate long-term hunger?
Just going to give it a few seconds.
Okay, and we're going to move on to the next slide to explore some definitions
to help us answer this question.
Once again, if you've already entered the poll, you can close the poll so that you can view the slides.
To determine whether this work plan aligns, we'll review the corresponding definitions that can be found
in the performance measure instructions.
Long-term hunger refers to the USDA's definition of low food security or very low food security.
Low food security, based on the USDA definition means households reduce the quality,
variety, and desirability of their diets but the quantity of food intake
and normal eating patterns were not substantially disrupted.
And very low food security means at times during the year,
eating patterns of one or more household members were disrupted and food intake reduced because the
household lacked money and other resources for food.
So according to the poll, a large majority of you did think -- I did quote the poll,
but from what I remember, did think that the correct answer is, yes.
And you were right.
Well, you know, it does need some work; this work plan can be aligned to fit with the definition.
If the data collection tools demonstrate the population being served
is experiencing low or very low food security,
then this work plan can be adapted to align with Healthy Futures.
So moving on, if the project does choose to continue with food security measure H11,
there may be an option for outcome sharing.
So if they want to make this an outcome work plan, let's look at how they could work on aligning that.
The project's current outcome is 60% of participants report that the vegetables grown helps
them meet their basic food needs.
The appropriate outcome H12 is the number of individuals that reported increased food security of
themselves and their children as a result of CNCS-supported services.
So I think everyone kind of determined through the poll and we kind of realized with some adjustments
this work plan could report an outcome associated with the output.
The new work plan for the Healthy Futures measure would read an output of 390 individuals receive services to
alleviate long-term hunger.
The new outcome would be 234 individuals report increased food security
as a result of CNCS-supported services.
Now, another change to kind of note here is that the program changed the outcome from a percentages
reporting increase reporting to a number.
And that's another little change that programs will make when they're aligning with new measures,
is oftentimes they've been reporting on percentages and they just need to make the switch to numbers.
Moving on, we're going to explore strategic plan objective 3,
Healthy Futures access to care.
And there are three corresponding measures within access to care.
There is H2, number of clients to whom information on health insurance,
healthcare access and health benefits programs is delivered.
H4, number of clients participating in education programs.
And H7, number of clients receiving language translation services at clinics and in emergency rooms.
The project thinks that current activity that they're working on may fit output H4,
the number of clients participating in health education programs.
The service activity is RSVP Bone Builders exercise trainers will provide twice weekly one-hour strength
training and balance classes free of charge to participants in the two-county area.
The current output is 800 participants will attend Bone Builders classes weekly for the 12-month grant period.
The current outcome is 75% of participants will demonstrate improvement in strength,
flexibility, balance, socialization and well-being.
Now we're going to do another poll and see if you think that the Bone Builders work plan
can align with Healthy Futures measure H4.
Again, the current output is 800 participants who attend Bone Builders classes weekly,
for the 12 month grant period.
Output measure H4 is number of clients participating in health education programs.
And as we've done for to other work plans, we're going to look at the performance measure instructions that
are located in appendix B of the NOFO, and look at some definitions and make sure we can align this work plan.
And again, you can close the poll if you've already responded.
And the definition we're going to look at is Health Education Program.
And a Health Education Program is defined as any planned combination of learning experiences designed to
predispose, enable and reinforce voluntary behavior conducive to health in individuals,
groups and communities and/or an educational process by which the public health system conveys information to
the community regarding community health status, healthcare needs,
positive health behaviors, and healthcare policy issues.
So as we can see on the poll once again, the majority agreed that this can be aligned
to fit the new measures.
And the correct answer is, yes.
So 83% of you got that right.
And the measure H4 is an output measure, so there is no outcome pairing that the project could explore.
So before we move on, I just want to pause for questions again.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay, our first question.
One second, please.
Well, I just want to note, older adults definition is 65 and older,
going back to the previous question.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Oh, thank you, Tarah.
>> Tarah Maners: The next question is: Is this measure limited to families with children
or can it also apply to older adults?
And this is regarding the last work plan review.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay, let me refresh my memory.
We were talking about the community gardens.
Is that what it's referring to?
>> Tarah Maners: Yes.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Yes, this applies to -- let's review the definition again.
This applies to the Healthy Futures in terms of access to food,
this applies to families or households and you count each individual in a household,
including adults and children.
This is not limited to children.
>> Tarah Maners: And do soup kitchens and food pantries also align with H11?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Good question.
And I want to confirm an answer to that, because I think it kind of just depends on the clients they're
serving, because the goal is to alleviate long-term hunger.
So, for example, the Community Garden, they're teaching them how to grow healthy vegetables and in turn
educating them and moving them towards food security.
So presumably those going to food pantries might not necessarily be reaching food security quite yet.
So I think that in terms of alleviating long-term hunger is what complicates this.
So what I would like to look into is the rest of the measures and see if there is an opportunity to fit in
the food pantry somewhere and what that would look like.
So we'll address that in the forum.
>> Tarah Maners: One other question.
If we report numbers instead of percentages on outcomes,
would that mean that we should survey all recipients?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: There is a data.
I'm sorry, go ahead.
>> Tarah Maners: I was just going to say, it goes on to say that this project
does survey a sample of beneficiaries.
But they wanted to know if they needed all the recipients to answer the survey.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: There is a session.
I think it's available on-demand on actually collecting data,
and I think that would be the best session to view in terms of how to collect the data
to support these measures.
But I can also follow up and include that in the forum.
>> Tarah Maners: Great.
I think that will be all for now and we'll continue with our questions later in the presentation.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay.
So we're going to move on to review the project plan.
And note this is going to reference some of the percentages that are part of the
new performance measure requirements.
So hopefully there's no confusion, but this kind of assumes that everybody has reviewed the RSVP
performance measure modules that was available before the conference started,
but please do feel free to submit questions if you have some.
First, we learned that the first work plan at the VA Medical Center is not in the Healthy Futures and will
be included in Community Priorities.
And they have 75 unduplicated volunteers serving at this station.
And again, unduplicated volunteers is a very important part of the measurement
for the near performance measures.
You can only report each volunteer on one work plan.
Next, the Community Garden work plan does align with Healthy Futures and can also be used as an outcome work
plan, and they have 65 unduplicated volunteers serving in the community garden station.
And then the Bone Builders work plan also aligned with Healthy Futures
and they have 200 unduplicated volunteers.
So let's see what that looks like percentage wise.
The project's primary focus area can be Healthy Futures.
The total number of unduplicated volunteers is 800.
And between the Bone Builders and community gardens there is 265 unduplicated volunteers in Healthy Futures
or 33% of the project.
This meets the 25% requirement for a primary focus area.
The VA is the project's only other community priority, and with 75 unduplicated volunteers
it represents 9% of the project.
This well within the allowable range for Community Priorities.
Community Priorities can be as high as 30% but it's okay to be below this percentage.
And finally, we didn't review their other work plans.
But using the performance measure instructions, the project found that the program is able to adapt the
remaining work plans to fit measures in the other focus areas and capacity building which represent the
remaining 58% of unduplicated volunteers.
So now that we've gone through kind of a sample project plan or a little bit of a sample project plan,
please submit any questions through the chat function.
We have about five minutes to answer questions.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay.
We do have several questions regarding congregate meals.
Will congregate meal service be an acceptable activity within this focus area?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: It will not.
There is a frequently asked question and it specifically states that congregate meals will be in
Community Priorities, which can be 30% of your project.
>> Tarah Maners: Another question is: Would you put the activity veterans at the VA in Community Priorities
rather than veterans and military families focus area?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: That's a good question.
And the program could explore whether they can fit it within the veterans focus area.
And if you're curious about that focus area, there is an on-demand session.
It's also slated for 4:00 today on other Community Priorities -- I'm sorry -- on the remaining focus
areas, and it actually goes through and explores what can be included in veterans,
as well as the other focus areas.
>> Tarah Maners: One general question is: Where can we find a comprehensive list of all performance measures
that includes definitions and is not part of the on-line learning module?
They're asking for a printable list.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay.
Yeah, that would be the -- and this module we've gone through is not all-inclusive of the measures and we
didn't explore every single definition.
So that can actually be found in the RSVP NOFO and it's the appendix B.
>> Tarah Maners: Thank you.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: And if that NOFO isn't available somewhere,
I can see if we can make it available in the files section.
>> Tarah Maners: Great, and if a volunteer is counted in the primary focus area,
in terms of unduplicated volunteers, can they be in any other work plan,
for example, in capacity building?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: No. So each volunteer is counted only once.
So they can definitely serve in other areas, but what projects will want to do is kind of strategically
determine where they can show the most impact for their volunteers.
So, for example, if you have a project that is serving veterans,
but also could fit under Healthy Futures, then you know,
you might want to keep it in Healthy Futures because you can also report on the veterans in the progress report
that will be a separate section of demographics for reporting veterans served.
You show more impact if you keep it in the primary focus area.
So in terms of, if you have 100 volunteers, only 100 volunteers can be represented in the entire work plan.
If you have -- if we added it up and it showed more than 100 volunteers,
it would be incorrect.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay. We do have several questions coming in,
but we just have time for one more before we move on to the next section.
This is a bit specific, but if volunteers are visiting people in hospitals who intend to go home to live
independently, could that be acceptable in the first example?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: No. Because they're not at home.
But if there's any follow-up on that, please put it in the forum.
[Overlapping Speakers} Pardon?
>> Tarah Maners: There will be many questions in the forum. [Laughing]
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Good! And I anticipated a lot of questions.
This is just kind of the tip of the iceberg in terms of the measures,
and as we know, RSVP has a lot.
So I really appreciate everybody's participation and your great questions.
And I look forward to kind of digging into them a little more in the forum.
But right now, we are going to move on to another important focus area.
We're going to move on to the focus area in education.
And I'm actually going to go over housekeeping one more time.
So forgive me those that were already on here, but I anticipate that some people might have joined just to
listen in on education.
So just first, again, please use your computer speakers for audio.
If you're having a hard time hearing me, please turn them up.
If that doesn't help, closed captioning is available.
Click on the left-hand side of your screen on the bottom it says "CC."
If you have a question, again, please submit them through the chat function -- or through the "Q&A"
button on the left-hand side, a green button on the left bottom corner,
and we will have time for questions throughout the remainder of the presentation
and also time for Q&A at the end.
And also, if you click on the content button, that is where you will access the forum.
So we are collecting questions and we are going to revisit questions that either we are unable to answer
due to time or that we need to look into further.
And also, you can make the screen bigger by clicking on the bottom right-hand side of the screen,
there is a little box with arrows pointing outward.
And if you click on that, you will make the screen bigger for you.
And so over the next half hour we are going to review two work plans to decide if they can be adapted to
align with the new education performance measures.
Again, we're going to be using the RSVP performance measure instructions,
which are found in the RSVP competition NOFO Appendix B.
We are going to explore how current volunteer activities can demonstrate an impact in education.
Again, there's going to be time for question and answer.
The education focus area states that grants will provide support and/or facilitate access to services
and resources that contribute to improved educational outcomes
for economically disadvantaged people, especially children.
Grant activities will improve school readiness for economically disadvantaged young children,
educational and behavioral outcomes of elementary, middle,
and high school students with special and exceptional needs,
and the preparation for and prospects of success in post-secondary education institutions for economically
disadvantaged students or students with special or exceptional needs.
Now, once again, we're going to go through an exercise and explore a work plan to see if it can be adapted to
fit within the new performance measures.
The current RSVP program identified education as their primary focus area
and they have a total of 185 unduplicated volunteers.
Like I said, we're going to review two work plans to determine if it fits.
The RSVP education focus area of K-12 success has two output measures and four outcome measures.
The first measure the program would like to explore is ED4A as seen in bold on your screen.
It is the number of disadvantaged youth mentor matches sustained by the CNCS-supported program for at least
the required time period.
The service activity that the program thinks will fit with ED4A is the RSVP volunteers will serve as an
after-school program as mentors and tutors for at-risk children.
The current output that they're using on this work plan is 65 at-risk students will be mentored and tutored by
RSVP volunteers after school.
And the current outcome is 60 students will be promoted to the next grade in school.
So does it fit K-12 success?
Once again, the output for this measure is the number of disadvantaged youth,
mentor matches that were sustained by the CNCS-supported program
for at least the required time period.
There are a lot of definitions to explore within this particular measure.
So we're going to move on and explore the definitions that can be found in the NOFO.
The performance measure instructions define mentors as adults who provide CNCS-sustained support to children
or youth through either community-based programs or school-based programs.
Programs that involve peer-to-peer support should not be included
in this measure for those programs who use tutoring measures.
Community-based mentorship, you're going to count mentees
and those matches that are intended to be continuous with the
same mentor for two to three hours per week for at least 12 months and up to 24 months.
And mentoring relationships are ideally one mentor per child,
but it could be a small group with a ratio of no more than 1-3.
The next term that applies is disadvantaged youth, which includes those youth who are economically
disadvantaged and one or more of the following: who are out of school youths including out of school youths who
are unemployed, who are in or aging out of foster care, who have limited English proficiency,
who are homeless or who have run away from home, who are at risk to leave secondary school without a
diploma, who are former juvenile offenders or at risk of delinquency,
who are individuals with disabilities.
It is the grantee's responsibility to ensure the beneficiaries of service meet the eligibility
requirements provided in the definition.
Finally, economically disadvantaged is defined as eligible for free or reduced lunch and may or may not
be accessing free or reduced lunch.
So we've got a lot of definitions here, but the program can make it work.
Using the performance measure instructions, the program has identified a few ways to adapt.
First, they need to specify that the mentor time commitment is at least 12-24 months.
They need to specify that the number of children per mentor is no higher than 3-1.
And for their purposes, they used the term "at risk-children."
They need to define at-risk children and determine if the children they are serving qualify as disadvantaged
or economically disadvantaged.
So the program, like I said, has determined that they can fit in this and that the children they are serving
are economically disadvantaged.
So they would like to explore this as an outcome measure,
and the outcome options for the selected output are the number of students with improved academic performance
and literacy and/or math.
ED27, the number of students in grades K-12 that participated in the mentoring or tutoring or other
education programs, including CNCS-supported service learning,
who demonstrated improved academic engagement.
ED6, number of youth that have improved their school attendance over the course of the CNCS-supported
program's involvement with the student.
And ED26, the number of students acquiring a GED.
Now, the current outcome that the program is using is 60 students
will be promoted to the next grade in school.
On outcome measure ED27 is the number of students in grades K-12 that participated in the mentoring or
tutoring or other education program including CNCS-supported service learning
who demonstrated improved academic engagement.
So the program is already tracking based on going to the next grade.
But this is actually requiring improved academic engagement,
so the program can make this work.
So since they decided that this measure can align with education,
the new work plan is an output of 65 disadvantaged youth and mentor matches are sustained by the
CNCS-program for at least the required time period.
And the new outcome is 60 students in grades K-12 that participated in mentoring or tutoring or other
education programs, including CNCS-supported learning who demonstrated improved academic engagement.
So right now I'm going stop for questions.
So again, submit questions through the "Q&A" button on the bottom left-hand side.
It's a green button.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay.
And the first question is: Is there a way to put adult literacy tutors in this focus area?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: You might want to explore some of the other education options,
because the definition did seem to indicate that adults may be an option.
So I think it merits further exploration, but it might depend on what the activity is.
It also could be a fit depending on how the program works.
It could also maybe fit within the economic opportunity focus area.
So not knowing the exact activity, I can't say "yes" or "no,
but I think it's worth exploring.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay.
And we have a few general questions also at this point.
Is it correct that there can only be one work plan for Community Priorities
which can contain up to 30% of unduplicated volunteers?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: So there is the requirement that only 30%
be in the Community Priorities -- up to 30%.
And as far as I understand, I'm not sure yet if it's a requirement,
so I can get back to you on that in the forum, but my understanding is that it's going to be encouraged,
that people use one work plan for Community Priorities.
>> Tarah Maners: And will the project report hours of the volunteers only in the primary focus area?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: The project is going to report on unduplicated volunteers and results.
Ours, I believe, may be still be in the demographic section of reports,
but it's not necessarily going to apply in the work plan.
So you would -- in the demographic section I think you still report on all the volunteers.
>> Tarah Maners: And are you required to have a work plan for all six of the primary focus areas in your grant?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: No.
So the program can choose, you know, where they want to focus their grant.
So each project will have to focus at least 25% of their volunteers in a primary focus area of their
choosing and then the remaining -- you know, they have that 30% that can be other Community Priorities,
and whatever is left they're going to fit into the focus areas of their choice.
You don't have to represent all six focus areas.
>> Tarah Maners: And just one more question, general question before we move on.
Do all volunteers need to be recruited in the first year of a three-year grant?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: I am going to defer that to the forum or potentially a competition question.
So that may need to go to the competition area, but I'll make a note of it and maybe mention at least the
email address for competition in the forum.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: So moving on, now we will review a work plan that the project would like to align with
education measures and school readiness.
Of the specific output we are going to review is ED21, the number of children that completed participation in
CNCS-supported early childhood education programs.
The service activity that they think will fit with this measure is the RSVP volunteers serve at Smart Start
locations and work with children to support reading,
language development, and socialization.
The output is 40 children will be served by RSVP volunteers in Smart Start locations and the outcome is
70% of the children involved will be developmentally and academically prepared for kindergarten.
So we're going to do a poll to see what you think.
Can the School Readiness Plan align with education measure ED21?
The measure is the number of children that completed participation
in CNCS-supported early childhood education programs.
And the measure -- the current work plan is RSVP volunteers -- or I'm sorry -- 40 children will be
served by RSVP volunteers in Smart Start locations.
Okay, while we're answering the poll, we're going to review a few definitions to help us determine what the
answer to this question is.
Again, with education there are a lot of definitions to go through.
The relevant definitions include children up through the age of kindergarten enrollment who are enrolled in
early childhood education programs and who are economically disadvantaged children and/or have special
or exceptional needs that limit their academic, social, or emotional development.
Economically disadvantaged means they're eligible for free or reduced lunch and again,
they may or may not be actually be accessing that service.
Moving on to some more definitions, we have special or exceptional needs.
Children who are developmentally disabled such as those who are autistic,
have cerebral palsy or epilepsy, are visually impaired, speech impaired,
hearing impaired, orthopedically impaired, or emotionally disturbed,
or have a language disorder, specific learning disability,
have multiple disabilities, other significant health impairment or have literacy needs.
Children who are abused or neglected and need foster care,
adjudicated youth, homeless youth, teenage parents, and children
in need of protective intervention in their homes.
Moving on to more definitions.
We have completed participation.
So at the outset of the activity, the program should indicate how much time,
like how many days or hours, is required in order to complete the activity.
They will only count the number of students who meet that threshold by the end of the program or activity.
This number will be used as a denominator for selected measures and therefore,
the amount of participation should be enough to influence the results.
An early childhood education program is a program in which CNCS-supported activities help pre-K students
maintain enrollment and succeed in early childhood education programs.
The help that grantees provide does not need to be in direct service to the students,
however, the CNCS-supported activities must provide direct support that makes the program possible.
So it looks like, according to the poll, 84% of you thought
that this could align with the education measures.
And you are correct.
If the data collection tools demonstrate the children served meet the requirements of economically
disadvantaged or special or exceptional needs, then this work plan can be adapted
to align with this measure.
And so if the program does choose to adapt it, there is an outcome pairing for this measure.
The current outcome that they are tracking is 70% of the children involved will be
developmentally and academically prepared for kindergarten.
The project is chosen to change their data collection to accommodate the new outcome,
and the outcome measure, ED23, is number of children demonstrating gains in school readiness in terms of
social and/or emotional development.
And so the new work plan, the project has decided that this will work in the new work plan,
it has an outcome of 40 children, complete participation in CNCS-supported early childhood
education programs, and an outcome of 34 children demonstrate gains in school readiness in terms of
social and/or emotional development.
So moving on, we've reviewed two work plans, and we learned that the first work plan in after school
mentoring can fit into K-12, education with some adaptations,
and they have 55 unduplicated volunteers serving in this area.
And the Smart Start work plan was also adapted to fit within early childhood education
with 20 unduplicated volunteers.
So let's see what this looks like percentage-wise.
The project's primary focus area can be education.
The project's total number of unduplicated volunteers is 185.
And remember we're only counting unduplicated volunteers.
Meaning, you cannot include a volunteer in more than one work plan.
In between after school mentoring and Smart Start, there is 75 unduplicated volunteers
in education or 40% of the project.
This meets the 25% requirement for a primary focus area.
The project reviews instructions and determines that 30% of their volunteers
are serving in Community Priorities.
And using the instructions, the author reviewed the rest of their work plan and decided that the remaining
stations can fit measures in the other focus areas in capacity building.
So now that we've reviewed education, I would like to pause for some more questions.
And we have plenty of time for questions.
So please submit them through the green "Q&A" button on the left-hand side of your screen.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay.
And again, one general question that has come up quite a bit is: Where can people find the RSVP NOFO?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: It should be available now on the Senior Corps website,
but hopefully we have a link somewhere in this conference.
I will follow up on that and post a note in the forum.
So please come back and review the forum which again, you can access on the left-hand side
of your screen under "Content".
>> Tarah Maners: That was also a question that has come up,
where the forum is -- how people can access the forum.
Is there a sample sheet with definitions and can that be placed in the forum as well?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay, I'll see if we can add files.
I'm not certain about the platform, but it is in the definitions that we reviewed today,
they're all included in the RSVP NOFO Appendix B.
So you will have access to all of these definitions to help kind of look at your project plans and activities
you're doing and help them align.
>> Tarah Maners: So it has been noted that during the performance measurement overview recently,
the information was given that 30% of volunteers needed to be in the primary focus area and 25 can be in
community priority areas, however, this presentation seemed to switch that.
Can you explain a little bit about that?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Sure. Good question.
Yes, this actually did change.
So originally, earlier this summer, before they kind of -- I don't think everything is completely final yet,
but they did the switch.
So originally it was that 30% had to be in a focus area and only 25% were going to be in community priorities,
but based on, you know, they've got a lot of feedback from the field in determining these measures and it was
determined that it would be better to have 25% in the primary focus area and enable projects to
include up to 30% in community priorities.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay, another question is: Will one school year meet the definition for the education work
plan areas as a school year is generally nine months?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Yes.
So the program basically determines at the outset what completion of the activity will look like or completion
of the program will look like, and then they will count the students
or the children that participated fully in the program.
>> Tarah Maners: And going back to the beginning of our presentation,
does homebound -- can you explain a little more about homebound?
Does homebound mean an individual can't leave the home or has limited capacity to leave?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Limited capacity.
So let's review the definition.
Forgive me; I want to make sure I quote it exactly.
Just give me a second.
Homebound is defined as individuals unable to leave their personal residence due to disability,
injury or age, may be a short-term or long-term need, for example,
an individual may have a broken hip that prevents them from driving for a few months but after the injury has
healed they no longer require help to live independently?
Can you repeat the question real quickly so I can explore it some more?
>> Tarah Maners: Sure, the question was to define homebound.
Does that mean limited access such as uses a walker or maybe can't drive?
So it was basically a review of the definition.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay. I mean, I think that it makes sense.
If whatever impairment they have limits their ability to live independently.
In other words, if they couldn't live independently without some assistance then I think that
would define it -- meet the definition of homebound.
>> Tarah Maners: Thank you.
And what work plans or what focus area would pertain to individuals who are not homebound?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Individuals that are not homebound.
There is -- I think it would depend on what the activity is.
So I'm trying to think what exactly the question is getting at.
But there are -- I mean, for Healthy Futures, the focus really that we explored here was independent living.
So obviously you probably wouldn't fit something in there.
Now, you could explore the definitions within respite care and see if there's anything that would fit there,
but, again, I think homebound would be involved there.
But there may be services you're providing that fit within another focus area,
but it just depends on the activity that you're referring to.
>> Tarah Maners: Thank you.
We do have time for a few more questions.
Regarding food security, can you have a household of one?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Yes.
In fact, food security is actually counting each individual in the household.
>> Tarah Maners: And regarding numbers served, if volunteers -- RSVP volunteers are serving alongside
other volunteers at a site, how would you determine the best way to show results
on the percentage of total volunteers?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay, I think one recommendation I have is to review the data collection module,
which I think is available on-demand, and there should be a forum in there where you can also ask questions.
I think that's a better question for data collection.
But what I'm trying to clarify is the term "percentages."
So, again, we are tracking number of people served, not percentages in these new measures.
>> Tarah Maners: Thank you.
Can a client be counted in the outcome if they are served by an RSVP volunteer who is counted in a
different focus area but also serves in this area?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: No.
So you're going to be including each volunteer only once.
And reporting on that volunteer in only one work plan.
>> Tarah Maners: For corporation supported early childhood education programs,
the definition says that grantees do not provide direct service but their activities must provide direct
service that makes the program possible.
Could you discuss what kinds of activities can be included in direct support?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: So that definition is a little tricky.
So I would like to explore that in the forum.
So I'll follow up with that, if you can revisit the forum over the next couple of days.
And feel free to enter it in there as well.
But I'm going to go through the questions that have been submitted during this presentation and exploring
them a little bit deeper so I can give the best possible answer.
>> Tarah Maners: And we just have time for a couple more.
Can you have two work plans for Healthy Futures?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Yes.
You can have multiple work plans within the focus areas.
So, for example, we explored community garden and decided that the Bone Builders exercise would work
within Healthy Futures.
So those would be two separate work plans that help the project reach the 25% of a primary focus area.
You can do that with other focus areas too.
You could have a couple in veterans, a couple in capacity building.
You can have more than one work plan in a focus area.
>> Tarah Maners: And is six the most work plans that a project can have?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: No.
So once again, a program can have more than one work plan in any focus area.
So we're not -- it's not limited to just one per focus area.
You don't have to address every single focus area.
Again, you've got your 25% that you obtain through work plans that fit within the measures,
but you can have more than one work plan under each measure.
>> Tarah Maners: One more question: Would programs that offer medication assistance and provide tools to
clients to obtain free or discounted medications fall into any of the work plans we've discussed today?
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Most likely, yes.
So obviously there's probably some definitions that they need to explore.
But, yeah, because part of Healthy Futures is increasing access to care.
So under that measure, they should be able to find a way to fit it.
I mean, again, depending on certain definitions and who they're serving.
>> Tarah Maners: And, Emily, if you could once again, clarify that the total number of volunteers which need
to be in the primary focus area as well as Community Priorities.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Once again, you're only counting volunteers in one work plan
and you're only counting them once.
So the entire project plan, if you have 100 volunteers, only 100 volunteers
should show up when you total up all of the work plans.
And so based on that, at least 25% of those volunteers need to be in a primary focus
area that you choose.
And then up to 30% may be in Community Priorities but it can be less than that.
And then the remainder of your volunteers will need to be represented
in the other focus areas and capacity building.
And I just want to follow up to the question on medicine and healthcare access.
I do want to note that there is measure H2, which is the number of clients to whom information on health
insurance, healthcare access, and health benefits programs is delivered.
And so I would recommend that the program explore using the performance measure instructions,
which again, are in Appendix B of the NOFO, definitely explore that measure H2.
>> Tarah Maners: Once again, just to review where this information can be found in the forums and how people
can print and download these presentations.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay.
The forums are located -- if you look at the bottom left-hand side of your screen near the Q&A,
there is a button that should say "Content."
If you click on that, you have options.
One is "Files" and that's where you can access this PowerPoint.
And then also the "Forum," which is where we'll be following up on some questions and you can submit
additional questions and even attendees can chat amongst themselves in the forum.
>> Tarah Maners: Okay, I think that would be the last question for now.
>> Emily Kubiszewski: Okay, great.
Well, once again, I would like to thank everybody for your participation and very thoughtful questions.
And I look forward to getting into the forum and kind of going through and trying to answer questions in more
detail or refer you to where you might be able to find the answer.