My Australia: Episode 11 - Part 1


Uploaded by australianetwork on 09.11.2010

Transcript:
Hello, Iím Vijay Khurana. Welcome to My Australia, the show about people from overseas having
Australian experiences.
On todayís programme
Michelle and her husband have a house-warming party in their brand new home
Selby races radio controlled cars
and Preeti has the experience of a lifetime.
Itís an Australian tradition that when you move into a new house you invite some friends
around for a party, and Michelle and her husband are doing just that.
Letís take a look.
I grown up in a city called Wuhan.
I donít have any siblings which is kind of sad.
My mum used to be an accountant but she stay home, look after family and be more supportive.
My dad run his instrument making business.
He makes all kinds of Chinese classic instruments.
Because my dad he was making instrument a lot of time I had to spend practising my instruments
while other kids probably can just play
but I definitely appreciate now.
It make me feel that I have something other people donít have.
My parentsí idea was to send me to study in Sydney.
I met Simon, my future husband, and he was helping me in studying English.
And he introduced Adelaide to me and thatís why I came to here.
I know about different sizes but Iím not sure which one we should be using.
He helped me a lot in all kinds of ways.
But I still had to make my own effort to find out more things because, you know, you canít
rely and depend on other people.
We spend our spare time, usually we go hiking, cycling.
Itís just such a contrast, you know, where I came from in China.
Where are the people?
Because you canít see any pedestrians.
It was a daunting feeling for me for quite a while, especially when I go into a empty
space.
It took me a long time to get used to, to be alone, and to get comfortable with not
surrounded by people.
Itís Australian tradition to have housewarming.
When people move in to a new place they tend to gather family and friends to celebrate.
Make the table a bit nicer.
Itís really important I think for us because we have been working, studying and now finally
got our own house.
My side of friends doesnít know Simonís side of friends but they all nice people and
we know that they will be able to get along really well.
Well today is definitely a celebration of having finished the house.
Obviously the landscaping still has to be done but itís a celebration of an achievement.
My parents are preparing dumplings and there will be a couple of stir-fries coming up
and finally the barbecue on the Weber.
A little bit more.
A little bit more.
Yeah, okay.
Just close it.
Iím not like your dad ...
No.
Your dad is making decorative stuff.
Making decorative stuff.
They are for females.
No.
And we are making simple ones for men.
And what speed?
Around eight.
Martin is my father-in-law and really nice guy.
Cake making is also new for my parents.
My dad, he really like it and he just wanted to learn.
So he asked me, ëOh, can you tell me the recipe. Iím to make it back home with mum.í
ëYeahí, I said, ëNo problem.í
My mentality was ñ back in China, okay ñ
when you invite people coming over youíve got to make sure you have food.
Food goes first but um, when I came to here I look at people having party and I thought
food is important
but not the most important part because the atmosphere is more important.
You can tell people up front what you want them to bring.
Itís gonna save me the effort to make everybody the food.
Or you can tell, ëbring your own drink.í
But in China itís kind of, the holder wouldnít feel in the position to ask the guest to bring
something extra.
Oh, cool.
Yeah!
Some of my friends have met my parents but some are not
so today will be the first time Iíll be introducing them.
And it will be interesting and Iíll be active, diligent, translator in between yeah,
because my parents just donít speak much of English.
Today we actually had a very good mixture of different background.
We have people from China, people from Japan, people originally from Singapore and Denmark,
Polish as well
so only four people turned out in a party were originally born in Australia.
My parents came to here for my graduation ceremony.
Itís the first time they visit in five years.
So itís a very important trip for them.
They are really nice people.
We communicate mainly using sign language because they donít speak English, I donít
speak Chinese.
But it works actually, and Michelle is always there as a backup to do the translation.
Thatís funny. He said, ëbye byeí to me.
I think he mixed up hello and bye bye.
Oh, I think itís fantastic.
They seem to like my friends and Simonís friends and you know, language is not stopping
them communicating and talking to people.
Thatís amazing. Iím really proud of my parents. They have done really well.
Itís just great to see people ...
friends, get together, and being happy.
Well, if theyíre happy then my parents are happy
and they think itís amazing that I conquered my language barrier and to be able to adapt
into a different culture.
Yeah, thatís good to hear.
They can see my hard work.
Iím going to cry, oh God.
Itís very emotional.
Yeah, because my parents, theyíre not the type of parents who like to praise me.
So itís not easy to hear the praise but Iím ... itís really good they said.
They always just keep how they think in their mind.
Yeah, Iím just not used to hearing good words from them I guess.
Yep, ah, okay.
I also have to understand they have their own life and I should have my own life as
well
and maybe eventually, when they retired they need me to look after them.
We can you know, come together again, but for now I will miss them. I will really miss
them.
Okay.
Not only was she the hostess but she provided the music too. Great work Michelle.
Now did you ever own a remote controlled car?
I had one when I was a kid but Iím pretty sure it didnít go as fast as the ones weíre
about to see.
Letís join Selby as he heads for the race track.