Basic Photoshop Tutorials : Photoshop Actual Pixels View


Uploaded by expertvillage on 22.08.2008

Transcript:
Adobe Photoshop is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated, and I am in
no way affiliated with Adobe. Okay, for this tutorial, I'm going to be talking about actual
pixels, seen at 100% of what your image is going to look like when it?s actually printed.
Because people worked on their images when they're small like this, and you can't really
realize what you're doing to your image, as far as actual pixels go. And I mean, seeing
your image at 100% basically. Now I'm going to change my mode here, just for this little
tutorial so that you can actually see up here where my cursor is. See where it says, "18.3%"?
Well, that is, 18.3%, that is the percent at which I am looking at my image. Now one
way to look at actual 100%, is to go to "view" and "actual pixels" and just click. And that
brings you, as you can see now, it says 100%. And this is showing you actual pixels of what
your image should look like once it's printed. I'm going to show you, the shortcut for that
was actually "alt, command, 0" on Mac, and I believe it?s "alt, ctrl, 0" on PC. But,
one thing that I do all the time, because it is so much more easier than the actual
shortcut, is you're going to go down over here to the magnifying glass, and the shortcut
for that is "z", But all you have to do is double click your magnifying glass and it
brings you straight to 100%, as you can see. That's something I do all the time because
I love to see my actual pixels and to see what kind of noise I have going on. As you
can see on this image, I have no noise, at all, anywhere on my blacks. Which is a good
thing, because when I get this printed out, it?s going to look extremely clean? And you
can also see right over here where my cursor is, an amount of percent of what your image
is. So if you're in big screen mode like this, you're not going to see where I was showing
you earlier. But you can look over here on your navigation to see that once you do the
shortcut for 100%, it?s right there. And this is beautiful for seeing what is going to be
printed and what it's going to look like when it's printed.