Boiler Nation: Student athletic trainers


Uploaded by PurdueUniversity on 07.04.2010

Transcript:
>> The following program is a special presentation
of the Big 10 network produced in association
with Purdue University.
[ Music ]
Purdue University presents Boiler Nation featuring athletic
training students.
[ Music ]
>> So you're hanging out with some buddies catching the game
on TV and what happens?
Your favorite player gets hurt, is taken out of the game,
gone for the rest of the season.
Now fast forward to next season.
The game's on and there's your athlete back, back at 100%.
What happened?
Well, that's where the athletic training students come
to the picture.
From taping ankles at game time to working one on one
with the athletes recovering from injuries,
these students are vital
to the university's entire sports program.
[ Music ]
>> As you'll see, Purdue's athletic training program is
tough, demanding, and not meant for your average student.
>> Students who can handle the course work,
which is a science-based course work, and also put
in the clinical time that we're taking away
that other students might use for study.
>> The course work is definitely,
definitely worth every amount you put into it
because when you get out on the mat, you want to be comfortable.
You want people to know what you're doing and you want
to look like you know what you're doing.
>> Athletic training is awesome at Purdue because I think
of all the great staff we have here, the atmosphere
that they present for the students to learn in,
and the opportunity to work with Big 10 athletics.
You get that big setting that Purdue offers as well as a kind
of close-knit family and a very rich heritage
in athletic training.
>> When people think of Purdue athletic training,
you should think of great people that are devoted to working
with their athletes and seeing them through the whole process
of season and competition from preconditioning to the season
to just working with the different injuries
that they might have, so It's just a group
of people that's really committed to doing their job
to make the athletes perform at their highest level.
>> The athletic training students provide a real service
to the athletic department, to the athletes here at Purdue,
as well as the profession in general provides a service,
an important service to athletes, to patients,
and all of the environments in which athletic trainers work.
Athletic training is a health care profession.
It's the profession that keeps the athletes
on the field playing, and that's important, and it's the kind
of philosophy that we try to instill in our students
that they are as important as the athletes
because they do keep those athletes playing.
>> I think we are as equal value as the student athletes
in the ways that when they get hurt,
I don't think they would be able to rehab their own ankle
and get themselves back into playing 100% without help
from us, so even though we don't get the attention or anything,
that's not why we do it.
We do it to help the athletes and to watch them perform
at their highest level ,and it's just fun to watch them grow
and watch the whole rehab process go , and it's just neat
to learn how the body reacts to different injuries
and stresses that's put on it.
So, it's something that really teaches you a lot.
>> You get to know the athletes on a personal level so you kind
of understand them a little bit better when it comes
to whether they're going through an injury or personal problem.
A lot of times, you're the one they come to,
and I think that they turn to us for a lot more
than just necessarily what, you know,
the athletic trainer on TV is seen as.
It's kind of a cateh-22 in this area
that you see everything from, you know, nutrition issues
to could be family issues to the psychological issues
of returning to play or dealing with an injury,
so I think the overall benefit
of athletic training is substantial.
>> I think the athletic training curriculum
at Purdue offers students a very unique opportunity.
The university as a whole provides a very sound,
basic science background, then we provide, I think,
an excellent academic athletic training set of courses,
and then our clinical education is structured,
we hope, to be second to none.
>> Our responsibility is to take them right out of high school,
work them through gaining their skills,
being able to apply those skills, and then bringing
that all together as a senior, they could go out
and be an athletic trainer at a high school,
in a sports medicine clinic, or a college or university
as a graduate student.
>> The fans that watch the game really watch their athletes,
their teams, and when something happens to them,
they think that it is the end of the world,
but as athletic trainers, it's our job to go out there
and make sure it's not the end of the world,
that they will come back and that
through the different things that we have learned,
we can get them back on the court next season,
next week, as soon as possible.
>> We want our youngsters to graduate
and continue the progression onward and upward and continue
to be better and better in our field.
>> In fact, Purdue's athletic training graduates have gone
on to become head and assistant athletic trainers in the NFL,
the NBA, the Big 10, the Pac 10, and other conferences.
You'll also find them serving all over the United States
in high schools and clinics.
Coming up, serious responsibilities
for Purdue's athletic training students
when Boiler Nation returns.
>> This presentation of the Big 10 network is brought to you
by Purdue University preparing tomorrow's leaders
for a changing world.
[ Music ]
>> When Purdue students arrive on campus,
they'll be getting much more than a four-year education.
They're embarking on a journey of discoveries
that will change their lives and the world.
At Purdue, students learn to invent science, business,
and global thinking to deliver solutions for the cultural,
political, and economic challenges facing people
across the globe.
At Purdue, we are preparing tomorrow's leaders
to deliver solutions for our changing world.
[ Music ]
>> Purdue Research Park.
The idea economy is here.
[ Music ]
>> Purdue Research Park.
The idea economy is here.
[ Music ]
>> When Purdue students arrive on campus,
they'll be getting much more than a four-year education.
They're embarking on a journey of discoveries
that will change their lives and the world.
At Purdue, students learn to invent science, business,
and global thinking to deliver solutions for the cultural,
political, and economic challenges facing people
across the globe.
At Purdue, we are preparing tomorrow's leaders
to deliver solutions for our changing world.
>> Welcome back to Boiler Nation,
Purdue's athletic training students.
As Purdue's students advance through the program,
they take on greater responsibilities
and gain confidence in their skills.
Each year of curriculum and hands
on training is building toward the senior year.
That's when athletic training students are put to the test
in real life situations throughout Purdue
sports program.
>> Athletic training is a lot more than just taping ankles.
That's the first thing that you kind of do
as a freshman is tape ankles, but you go well beyond
that into rehabbing the ankle that might need to be taped
or rehabbing shoulders and knees,
so the taping obviously helps to prevent the injuries
that we don't want to have to treat,
but once the injury happens, someone has to be able
to help the athlete get back into shape,
so taping the ankle is just the top
of the pile of things that we do.
>> Our students have experiences with high-risk sports,
with opposite gender sports,
with sports that have injuries predominantly upper extremity,
lower extremity injuries.
One of the things we try to do is also give our students
as broad a picture of different sports,
different experiences as they can.
>> Freshman year is
when students master some basic skills and learn
about the profession of athletic training.
This process is called directed observation.
Their sophomore year is a period of skill acquisition with hands
on training in various settings of different sports.
They focus on injury evaluation and begin their progression
into more advanced athletic training curriculum.
Their junior year is a period of skill application.
Under the guidance of a clinical instructor,
the juniors work directly
with senior athletic training students
to gain experience working with Purdue athletes, and then,
it's time for their final year in the program.
>> In the senior year, we try to integrate all of the skills
and knowledge that the athletic training student has learned
and picked up to that point, and when that happens,
they then can have major responsibilities in some
of the decision making that goes on as well
as demonstrating their judgment in the care of those athletes.
>> The specific responsibilities that the seniors kind of pick
up at their final year is everything
from helping the staff with administrative work
to actually looking at the injuries and doing your own eval
and coming up with rehabs for the athletes as they try
to regain confidence and ability to return to play.
>> I enjoy the fact that we have classes that teach us how
to do what we're doing now and in the afternoon we can come
into the training room and actually do what we've learned
in class, which is very valuable.
>> It's really awesome to be able to learn something
in the classroom and then bring it into competition
and let it apply, and it's really neat
to see how the things you learn are always presented
in competitions.
>> An athletic trainer is similar
to an athlete in many ways.
When the athlete is doing their pre game warm-up, getting ready,
you know, ready getting in the zone, getting ready
for what they have to do on the court, at the same time,
I'm doing the same thing.
I'm trying to figure out in my head, ok,
if someone has a leg injury, how am I going to treat that?
I feel like during the National Anthem,
I'm going through my head trying to figure out,
ok if someone has a concussion, CPR things, you know,
just thinking in my head, what am I going to do
if something happens so I'm prepared, you know,
if they call me up when it's my turn to go.
>> As seniors, the athletic training students help Purdue
athletes get back in shape, reach peak performance,
and stay safe, but injuries do occur,
and each sport has its own special set of challenges
for the athletic training students.
>> The sport of wrestling I see all different kinds of injuries.
It's awesome to be out there because you see different kinds
of blood injuries, different concussions, skin diseases,
muscular skeletal injuries,
from the foot all the way to the shoulder.
I mean you see a different variety of everything.
Wrestling is a big contact sport, and not only do they come
in contact with each other, but the come in contact with me,
so basically I have to prepare myself
as if everybody else has something that I can get,
so I definitely wear gloves every time I deal with any blood
or anything like that or any skin diseases because a lot
of skin diseases are very contagious,
so I definitely glove up.
I bring gauze everywhere I go into my pockets, in my hands.
I just bring everything that I could possibly come
in contact with, I'm prepared for.
Despite all the risks and dangers that are associated
with athletic training, I still love it because I love that mat,
like the competition, everything that's going on out there,
I'm so involved, and the guys really trust me,
and I have a good rapport with the guys and the coaches.
It's really an honor that some of the best wrestlers
in the nation really put their trust in me, and they believe
in my ability to give them my best
and put them back on that mat.
>> Coming up, we'll take a look at injuries and rehabilitation
when we continue with Boiler Nation.
>> [Background music] Fighting cancer is personal for me.
I watched my mom die from it.
>> Cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, lupus.
At Enodcyte, we're working on a better way
to treat all of these.
Four new drugs discovered
at Purdue University are now in nationwide clinical trials.
>> At Purdue Research Park, we look beyond the innovations
to build companies like Endocyte,
create jobs, and touch lives.
Purdue Research Park.
The idea economy is here.
>> At Purdue, we specialize in the development and research
of novel drug delivery technologies
that include exercise moderation and diet control.
>> Purdue Research Park.
The idea economy is here.
>> [Background music] When students walk
across the Purdue University campus,
they're doing more than going to class.
They're preparing to meet the challenges
of a diverse and fast paced world.
Purdue students encounter ideas that span oceans
and cross continents, inspiring new levels of innovation
that will build a better future for people
at home and around the globe.
At Purdue, we're preparing tomorrow's leaders
to deliver solutions for our changing world.
[ Music ]
>> Purdue Research Park.
The idea economy is here.
>> [Background music] Fighting cancer is personal for me.
I watched my mom die from it.
>> Cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, lupus.
At Enodcyte, we're working on a better way
to treat all of these.
Four new drugs based on discoveries
at Purdue University are now in nationwide clinical trials.
>> At Purdue Research Park, we look beyond the innovations
to build companies like Endocyte,
create jobs, and touch lives.
Purdue Research Park.
The idea economy is here.
>> The game is on.
The players are in top form, and Purdue University is set
to compete thanks, in large part, to the stars
on the sidelines, those athletic training students
who help the Boilermakers stay physically fit
and ready to play.
>> As a senior on Purdue Women's basketball team,
I've had the opportunity to see many different injuries.
A common injury in women's basketball is a tear
of the anterior cruciate ligament,
also known as an ACL tear.
This is Jody Howell, one
of our Purdue women's basketball players,
and she has torn her ACL.
Jody, how'd you tear yours?
>> Jody: I was playing in the game, and I went to pivot,
and I heard a crunch and a pop,
and it really hurt, and I went down.
>> And as you can hear, she said she heard a pop and a snap,
and that is what most athletes hear or feel
when they tear their ACL.
So once they have torn their ACL, the rehab process starts.
The first thing that we do is work on getting their range
of motion back, and the most common treatment
for a tear of an ACL is surgery.
So, before going into surgery, as much range of motion
as we can get as possible is best.
After surgery, we can begin working once again on extension
and flexion of the knee, and once we have that,
we can work on strengthening the knee.
What about bringing it up like this?
>> Jody: A little sore.
>> Ok, tighten this as tight as you can.
Any pain in there?
The most important thing
in the rehab process is getting strength back in the knee,
getting the athletes to feel comfortable with their knee,
and having full range of motion before they can compete again,
and the average ACL takes from six months to a year
until the athlete is fully confident
and ready to go back into play.
During the whole rehab process, it's very important
that we communicate with our athletes and make sure
that they aren't thinking
that what we're doing is too much, too painful.
We want to make sure that they are feeling strong
and secure with their knee.
Jody is now back 100% from her ACL tear after doing all
of her rehab and exercises.
>> Jody: It's a really hard injury to come back from,
but having a great training staff there with you,
like Maura, really helped the process,
making sure that you do your rehab
and that you're strengthening your knee and getting you back
to 100% and on the court.
>> Preparation and persistence setbacks caused
by injuries, rehab, and recovery.
It's the reality of sports, the reality faced by the athletes
in the athletic training students.
>> Ryan: Throughout my time here at Purdue University
in the athletic training program, I see many injuries.
This year, as a senior with men's basketball,
I have seen a lot of interesting ones.
Probably the most interesting one I've seen is
Robbie Hummel's.
Robbie suffered a stress fracture this year
in his lower back, and it's been tricky at some times
because this is an injury
that sometimes won't even show symptoms, but, with him,
he had pain, and he also had spasms, so necessarily,
it was tough to figure out at the time to gauge
when we could actually move on with rehab and treatment
because sometimes it would flare up, other times it'd be ok.
So the whole stopping and starting thing was kind
of frustrating sometimes.
>> Robbie: This season's pretty tough for me just
because I wasn't practicing.
I've never been a player where I could not practice
and go out and play well.
I've always had to, you know, keep shooting, keep moving,
keep running around, so that was really tough for me, and then,
I guess in terms of my back, it was also tough
because I was going through...I had been hurt before,
and there was just, you know, a lot of pain and a lot
of discomfort, and like Ryan said,
some days it would hurt really bad.
Other days it wouldn't really hurt at all,
and it would just kind of something
that would fluctuate like that.
>> Ryan: I was fortunate even though it was bad for him,
it gave me a lot of learning experience because I was able
to work with him, really hands on this year.
First because of the fact that he had problems
on the constant pounding on the court because of his back,
we did pool workouts with him at first.
I'd take him to the pool, and he'd be running
through some things, you know, keeping his endurance
up while he was not able to actually run up
and down on the court.
Well we also put him in the Boston brace.
What this does is limit him in going to extension,
which extension is what he's having the most painful
pain with.
Also it corrects his posture, therefore, I mean,
he could tell you he has better posture now than he did.
Well, if you knew him before, he has a lot better posture now.
Also through core stabilization exercises and also trying
to work on his flexibility of his hamstrings
and his hip flexors and his hip rotators,
I feel like we've gotten to a point where he is
at least somewhat pain free and able to do stuff
on the basketball court.
>> Every student athletic trainer here is very important
to athletes at Purdue University
because you can't have the attention of, I guess,
head physical therapist or, I guess, like a trainer
on you all the time, so they're just as knowledgeable.
They just don't have as many degrees yet,
but they're getting there.
But they definitely help us out.
You definitely build a relationship
with them that's really good for all student athletes
to get a chance to work with these student athletic trainers.
>> Ryan: When I first started working out with Robbie,
my goal was to get him back as soon as possible
because you could just tell on his face
that he just dreaded staying on the bench the whole time
when he was down there, and I'm happy to know for myself
when I leave, Robbie will be back to full strength
and be able to go like he was before his injury, and,
once again, be a great asset
to the Purdue men's basketball team.
>> Athletic training is keeping athletes healthy,
and if they have injury, working
with that individual specifically, working with them
in the athletic training room, doing rehab and treatment
to get them back on the floor.
That's a proud feeling as a student athletic trainer to know
that you were a part of that
and just seeing them have a great game,
you feel a little excited that you were able
to help them along with that process.
>> These athletic training students are vitally important
to Purdue's sports program, and after Purdue, then what?
We'll find out how they continue to make a difference
when we return with more of Boiler Nation.
>> [Background music] When students walk
across the Purdue University campus,
they're doing more than going to class.
They're preparing to meet the challenges
of a diverse and fast paced world.
Purdue students encounter ideas that span oceans
and cross continents, inspiring new levels of innovation
that will build a better future for people
at home and around the globe.
At Purdue, we're preparing tomorrow's leaders
to deliver solutions for our changing world.
[ Music ]
>> When Purdue students arrive on campus,
they'll be getting much more than a four-year education.
They're embarking on a journey of discoveries
that will change their lives and the world.
At Purdue, students learn to invent science, business,
and global thinking to deliver solutions for the cultural,
political, and economic challenges facing people
across the globe.
At Purdue, we are preparing tomorrow's leaders
to deliver solutions for our changing world.
>> [Background music] Fighting cancer is personal for me.
I watched my mom die from it.
>> Cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, lupus.
At Enodcyte, we're working on a better way
to treat all of these.
Four new drugs based on discoveries
at Purdue University are now in nationwide clinical trials.
>> At Purdue Research Park, we look beyond the innovations
to build companies like Endocyte,
create jobs, and touch lives.
Purdue Research Park.
The idea economy is here.
>> [Background music] This presentation
of the Big 10 network is brought to you by Purdue University,
preparing tomorrow's leaders for a changing world.
[ Music ]
>> Welcome back to Boiler Nation.
So, you've made the grade.
You're now an athletic trainer,
but not just any athletic trainer.
You're an athletic trainer from Purdue University,
and the future looks very nice.
>> Through Purdue, I've been able
to see the different atmospheres,
and I think I really like the high school atmosphere working
with those athletes, so, hopefully, once I graduate,
I'll be able to find a job working in a high school
with just a group of young kids that really want to play sports.
>> I'm lucky enough to have received a graduate internship
with another division one college.
I'm very excite to be able to go and work that.
>> My future plans after graduation are I'm going
to grad school at the University of Minnesota.
I'm going to be a Golden Gopher next year working primarily
with the women's rowing team, but also have responsibilities
for the men's and women's tennis team.
>> After I graduate from Purdue,
my future involves graduate school.
I'm really excited about moving
on because I love the collegiate level,
and I get to go somewhere else and learn other things, too.
>> My future plans are to attend University of Indianapolis
to study physical therapy school.
It's a three-year program.
I think it will be a wonderful completion
with my athletic training degree.
They go pretty much hand in hand, and I'm excited to be able
to use the skills that I've learned in athletic training
into the physical therapy world.
>> I feel like the opportunities that I've had is
because of the fact that I do have this Purdue behind my name
when I talk about student athletic training.
My opportunities with the NFL teams and now going
to grad school, I know that it made this thing a little sweeter
that I did say Purdue, so I do definitely believe
that this is an elite program.
>> Purdue athletic training uses forward thinking
in the classroom.
They teach us new ways to do rehabs and new things
that we can try on our athletes to see
if we can make them come back
from their injuries as fast as possible.
So, I think through what we learn in the classroom,
we're able to come into the clinical settings and work
with our athletes one on one,
and kind of see first hand what we have learned really does work
and be able to use it again in the future.
>> You know you don't as a coach of an athletic team,
if you don't practice well, you don't play well.
If you don't play a good team, you don't get better as a team.
Our athletic training curriculum
and the direction our clinical education goes is geared the
same way.
We try to meet the challenge.
We try to go beyond what the challenge is,
see if we can find new areas to do something better,
see if we can do better tomorrow what we did today.
>> You see a lot of people in a lot of different professions
that get into that profession
and then either burn out, don't like it.
I think we still have and can still create
with our students an enthusiasm about what they're doing,
and part of that goes with the fact that they're working
with sports, but, and there's enthusiasm there,
but also it has to do with the fact
that they love what they're doing.
>> My favorite part of athletic training is just the different
situations that you get to be in.
You get to work with the football players,
with the swimmers, with the basketball players,
with the track athletes, and you just get to see them
at their highest and their lowest,
and I think that's an awesome part of being able
to watch how we as athletic trainers really do have an
impact on how they perform and how they're able to compete
at their highest level,
so my favorite part's definitely been watching them grow
as athletes.
>> Many life lessons have been learned here for me.
I think definitely just a confidence in myself.
I did athletic training in high school a little bit,
and I lacked confidence, and I feel now leaving here
that I know that I'm a good athletic trainer
and that I'm going to be successful.
I think that I just learned how to be a good student,
be a good athletic trainer, be a good friend,
and just have the full life.
>> I like the family.
Over time you're here for four years.
You see people every day.
They become your family away from, you know, home, and I,
pretty much, I can truly say I enjoy everybody's company
in here, so there's always laughter, there's always fun.
It's work.
We're doing thing helping out the athlete,
but at the same time, it's enjoyable because they're people
that you like to be around.
And it makes it fun.
It makes it exciting to be here.
>> Beardmoore: From the newest freshman to the next senior
to be graduated from this program,
these students are dedicated to excellence
in caring for their athletes.
Simply put, it's a Purdue tradition.
It's part of our Boiler Nation.
I'm Tommy Beardmoore.
Thanks for joining us.
>> [Music] The preceding program was produced
by Purdue University in association
with the Big 10 network.