Tommy Wiseau & Greg Sestero (THE ROOM) LIVE with Beth and Videogum - 8/3/12 (Full Ep)


Uploaded by MyDamnChannel on 03.08.2012

Transcript:

[MUSIC PLAYING]

GABE DELAHAYE: Oh, hey, Beth.
BETH HOYT: Oh, hi, Gabe.
I didn't recognize you.
Hey guys, and welcome to a very special episode of My
Damn Channel LIVE.
I'm joined today by Videogum's Gabe Delahaye.
GABE DELAHAYE: Oh, hey, Beth.
BETH HOYT: Oh, hey, Gabe.
I didn't recognize you.
And we are both thrilled to welcome these stars of the
cult classic, The Room, Tommy Wiseau--
also the writer and director--
and Greg Sestero.
Welcome, you guys.
Thank you so much for being here.
GREG SESTERO: Very good to be here.
TOMMY WISEAU: Before we started, I want to give you
this little dogeee.
I want to announce.
And also, everyone, hello.
This is Tommy Wiseau.
I'm thrilled to be here in New York.
As you know, this is a little house.
We like to come here.
BETH HOYT: Awesome.
TOMMY WISEAU: So this is for you.
I designed this for your information.
BETH HOYT: Oh my goodness.
TOMMY WISEAU: And it's from The Room.
And you press here and maybe you have--
it's barking, actually.
BETH HOYT: Oh.
Hi, Dogeee.
TOMMY WISEAU: There you go.
That's for you.
BETH HOYT: Oh.
Hi, Dogeee.
I love it so much.
TOMMY WISEAU: Actually, do you know how to spell dogeee?
BETH HOYT: I have a guess in mind, which is-- do you have a
special way?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes, I do.
BETH HOYT: I'd like to hear that.
I'm going to give you a hint if you like.
BETH HOYT: Please.
TOMMY WISEAU: Actually, the pronunciation is dog-gee, as a
doggie, but we spell it D-O-G-E-E-E. Three E's.
BETH HOYT: I will forever and always spell dogeee that way.
Thank you, Tommy.
TOMMY WISEAU: Thank you.
BETH HOYT: OK, so what brings you to New York right now?
TOMMY WISEAU: We have a special screening of The Room
at the Sunshine.
Three days-- today, tomorrow, and Saturday.
BETH HOYT: Oh, fantastic.
I'm going.
TOMMY WISEAU: Sure.
Thank you.
BETH HOYT: I can't wait.
GABE DELAHAYE: How often do you guys come to New York?
How often do you do those screenings?
TOMMY WISEAU: We do a screening here once a month--
regularly for the past four years.
We still screen at the Ziegfeld as well--
the Village.
But right now we do the Sunshine.
So we've been screening right now, actually close to four
years maybe.
Something like that.
In total, together.
BETH HOYT: That's so fun.
What is one of your favorite things that the crowd does in
the screenings?
TOMMY WISEAU: Question for Greg or for me?
BETH HOYT: Greg, please.
GREG SESTERO: I think the audience participation is
probably my favorite part.
There's a scene towards the end when Tommy is kind of
trashing the whole room.
And he takes the dresser and he pulls the first drawer out,
the second drawer out.
And then he just throws the whole thing over.
And that's somehow turned into 1, 2, fuck it.
TOMMY WISEAU: Oh, F word is not allowed.
I'm just teasing.
BETH HOYT: We'll give it to you, guys.
But thank you.
I mean, in general, we appreciate you censoring that.
TOMMY WISEAU: Sure.
Oh, I'm not censoring.
I'm just looking for--
BETH HOYT: OK, good.
We don't want you to be censoring.
GABE DELAHAYE: Are we ready to go?
BETH HOYT: Let's dive in.
GABE DELAHAYE: All right.
BETH HOYT: Oh, first, we have a bunch of questions from--
TOMMY WISEAU'S VOICE: I have something for you.
GABE DELAHAYE: That's my signal
that we have a question.
TOMMY WISEAU: Sure.
BETH HOYT: All right, this is from Tumblr.
And this is from askkatieshneble.
"Dear Mr. Wiseau, I'm a big fan of your movie.
It really has spread throughout my school.
I was wondering what your inspiration was not just for
the movie itself but the character.
I know that oftentimes when I aspire to create a character,
I find myself adding traits that I myself have.
Could the same be said for you and Johnny?"
TOMMY WISEAU: Oh, boy.
BETH HOYT: So where'd the inspiration come from?
And did some of Johnny's character come from you?
TOMMY WISEAU: Absolutely.
Especially coming from life.
I always say we have many Johnnys, Lisa, all the
characters.
And that's why I noticed that a lot of people
connected to it.
And I noticed that you guys would be much more kind for
The Room right now.
Not you, I'm just saying general speaking.
So they come from life.
Two is better than three.
Three is a crowd.
We're so bad.
When you deal with relationship, do you want it
three people or do you want it two?
I rest my case.
So we've always been there if you really think about it.
And I noticed in the past--
I don't know, Greg, if you noticed.
I noticed the past two or three years, the audience is
actually getting what is behind The Room.
It's not just to be serious about.
Just forget the world, have fun.
GREG SESTERO: Yeah, there's so many layers in the movie.
BETH HOYT: Absolutely.
GABE DELAHAYE: Did you do a lot of
preparation for your character?
Did you create a back story for yourself?

Do a lot of ride-alongs with other people?
GREG SESTERO: Yeah, I tried to liken it
to The English Patient.
GABE DELAHAYE: That's what I was going to--
I didn't want to say it.
GREG SESTERO: Yeah, You got the beard.
And then after the beard.
TOMMY WISEAU: Which everybody was against it.
GREG SESTERO: It's kind of like Christian Bale in Dark
Knight with the beard and then coming out of it.
I'm just kidding, but I'm sure you knew that.
TOMMY WISEAU: Well, you should be serious because I'm
serious about it.
Why is the beard?
Because something's different.
Why is the tuxedo?
Because it's different.
BETH HOYT: There's a reason.
TOMMY WISEAU'S VOICE: I have something for you.
BETH HOYT: Oh, boy.
This is from Videogum monster.
GABE DELAHAYE: Now we go to a question from Videogum.
It's from Lindsay.
She writes-- "first, thank you, Videogum, for introducing
me to this movie over four years ago and making me
excited enough to buy it on Amazon sight unseen.
I say this in all sincerity.
Tommy, what is your favorite part of The Room?
If you could go back--" well, let's just
start with that first.
This is a long question from Lindsay.
Thank you, Lindsay.
What is your favorite part of The Room?
TOMMY WISEAU: You are tearing me apart, Lisa.
As well--
Chris-R.
GABE DELAHAYE: And then Lisa's follow-up is-- "if you could
go back and change anything about The Room, would you?
And what would it be?"
TOMMY WISEAU: Well, you see again, people have assumption
somehow or other using the two-camera format.
I don't know if you're familiar with that.
GABE DELAHAYE: We heard about it.
TOMMY WISEAU: Yeah, HD and 35.
And let me correct, if I may, everyone.
I've tried to correct this a bunch of times, and I can't.
First of all, Hollywood was confused before.
As you guys know, everybody uses the HD, et cetera.
The reason I shot in that format-- not just because I
was confused.
I'm proud to say that.
And people have a tendency to switch.
And they say, oh, he got confused.
Oh my god, end of the world.
No it's not end of the world.
We can-- you know what I'm saying?
GABE DELAHAYE: Who said it was the end of the world?
TOMMY WISEAU: A lot of people.
I'm just saying.
GABE DELAHAYE: Steven Spielberg said that.
TOMMY WISEAU: But a long story short, you see, that's the
reason I shot it on the two format because I wanted to
experience what is the difference.
At the time, we didn't have a book-- even today, if you look
at any bookstore, what's the difference between two
formats, you don't have a straightforward answer even
though we know about it, you know?
So I'm writing the book about it.
That's the story.
Move on.
Next question.
GABE DELAHAYE: OK.
BETH HOYT: All right, then.
Now, this is from Tumblr.
And anythingformyprincess asks you, "For Greg the beard
Sestero, how similar is your personality to Mark's?
TOMMY WISEAU: Oh, wow, that's a good question.
GREG SESTERO: Well, that's actually a good question
because I didn't know Mark had a personality.
TOMMY WISEAU: Of course he does.
GREG SESTERO: Mark is a very complex character because I
think he's a cop.
But we don't know that.
So it was a bit of a stretch for me to--
GABE DELAHAYE: So you did do a back story?
That's your back story?
GREG SESTERO: It came on the fly as I was trying
to figure it out.
GABE DELAHAYE: Tommy, what do you think
Mark's background is?
TOMMY WISEAU: I'm happy that you asked this question.
Because first of all, we have a couple of Marks on the set.
And he actually did a better job than the other person.
GABE DELAHAYE: Wait.
TOMMY WISEAU: Long story short, you see, I cast
everybody as two or three people in The
Room to have a backup.
My background is actually in theater.
So that's typical.
You cast two or three people just in case.
GABE DELAHAYE: So you had two cameras running on the film
the whole time and two actors playing every role?
TOMMY WISEAU: Not all of it.
We had backup, so this means I can call somebody and
say, you know what?
Let's change the actor.
And in Greg's situation, we have another Mark.
Actually, we are releasing it on the Blu-Ray.
And we give you a little clip, the person who was
supposed to play Mark.
And he took over because he did a better job.
And he'd been hired actually also as my assistant line
producer, et cetera.
BETH HOYT: How was that on the set for the actors, Greg,
knowing that there's backup and you still
haven't got the job yet?
That you're still continually auditioning?
GREG SESTERO: You know what?
Being on The Room, it was an experience every day.
BETH HOYT: Yeah.
That's a whole nother Room.
GREG SESTERO: Every day was a surprise.
BETH HOYT: It's The Room with the auditions of the actors.
TOMMY WISEAU'S VOICE: I have something for you.
BETH HOYT: Oh, boy.
This one is from Videogum.
GABE DELAHAYE: It's another question from Videogum.
BETH HOYT: Take it, Gabe.
GABE DELAHAYE: All right, I will.
This is from Laura Leigh Lentner.
She asks, "Lisa's mom--
did she make it?"
TOMMY WISEAU: She did make it.
GABE DELAHAYE: She did?
Did?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes.
She did.
GABE DELAHAYE: OK.
It's a miracle.
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes.
And do you know why?
GABE DELAHAYE: No, I do not know why.
TOMMY WISEAU: Well, if you look at any book in today's
society, you will find that a lot people have been cured
from cancer.
BETH HOYT: It's true.
TOMMY WISEAU: So I rest my case.
BETH HOYT: That's happened.
GABE DELAHAYE: Any book--
Hunger Games, Twilight--
BETH HOYT: If you look, yeah, people are being cured.
GABE DELAHAYE: Any of the books.
GREG SESTERO: Common theme, yeah.
TOMMY WISEAU: But actually, now we can laugh about it.
But the fact is that if you look at it seriously--
I studied this.
My little hobby is psychology, long story short.
And I interviewed some of the people.
And some people say, you hear this story like herbs
sometimes help, all kinds of medicine,
et cetera, et cetera.
Long story short, I think positive thinking when you're
in a certain stage of your illness, it does help people.
That's my point.
BETH HOYT: Absolutely.
And that's a nice positive thing to have with the movie,
considering the dark ending the movie does take.
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes.
BETH HOYT: So that's a nice thing to take from it.
OK, here's a Tumblr question.
This is from sayaka-lionheart.
"For Tommy Wiseau--
what do you look for in a woman?"
TOMMY WISEAU: That's good question.
Respect, commitment, passion, and other elements.
GABE DELAHAYE: Other elements?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes.
GABE DELAHAYE: That's the secret?
TOMMY WISEAU: Well, it's not a secret.
It's just that we don't have a half hour to spend.
I'm a very picky guy, so--
And also spirit.
And giving.
You see, I like when girls, for example, are
dressed up as a girl.
For example, I have a couple of questions--
people ask me, say, well, what do you mean by that?
Because I emphasize that.
Because you know, in today's society, girls don't have to
prove to me that she can actually work for, let's say,
police department or fire marshal to wear jeans.
Oh, yeah, I'm better than a guy.
Because you know why?
OK, do you want to hear?
GABE DELAHAYE: I do.
Yes.
Please.
I very much want to hear.
TOMMY WISEAU: Lisa--
did you ever see Cleopatra with Elizabeth Taylor?
GABE DELAHAYE: Sure.
TOMMY WISEAU: You can compare these two characters.
Some people say, oh god, what's the comparison?
Yes, it is big.
You know why?
GABE DELAHAYE: Why?
TOMMY WISEAU: Because girls, they have much more
power than we guys.
We're just tiny people.
GREG SESTERO: That is true.
TOMMY WISEAU: That's what I can say.
That's why if you look at the character of Lisa, why she's
manipulative, why she wanted what she wants.
You see, that's what I enjoy to
conversation with many people.
Because like I say, again, past three years because
people are actually getting that why is this?
They ask question, right now, why is this or that?
They say, what is behind the words?
If I said to you, how are you doing?
Do I have a sincere way?
That's important.
Or do I hate you?
I'm saying it's the same with the Lisa character.
If you compare Elizabeth Taylor,
Cleopatra, what is the comments?
Well, there's only one comments.
They know how to twist words around.
GABE DELAHAYE: Right.
TOMMY WISEAU: They know how to get into power.
BETH HOYT: Yeah.
They know how to wrap you around their finger.
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes, there you go.
Thank you.
TOMMY WISEAU'S VOICE: I have something for you.
BETH HOYT: Oh, boy.
A Tumblr question is from teaforstephanie.
"Greg, where do you think Mark ended up?
Do you think that Lisa and Mark eventually got back
together or went their separate ways for good?
GREG SESTERO: God, so many sequel options.
I think that Mark just took off from San Francisco.
I think he sold everything he had, jumped on a Greyhound
bus, and just took off.
BETH HOYT: Greyhound.
GREG SESTERO: Yeah.
TOMMY WISEAU: We may have a sequel.
GABE DELAHAYE: Are you working on that?
TOMMY WISEAU: Not at this time.
GABE DELAHAYE: OK.
TOMMY WISEAU: Working on different projects.
BETH HOYT: Greg, I understand you're working on a--
is that right-- you're working on a tell-all
book with your blessing?
GREG SESTERO: I'm working--
TOMMY WISEAU: Partially my blessing.
GREG SESTERO: Yeah, about my experiences making the film.
And it will be out next year for the 10-year anniversary,
which is hard to believe.
10 years.
TOMMY WISEAU: Yeah, 10 years.
BETH HOYT: Cool.
Great.
OK.
GABE DELAHAYE: We have another question from Videogum.
From Mr. Plainview.
"My very serious question would be this--
If a Hollywood gave you $100 million to make your dream
project, what would it be?"
TOMMY WISEAU: That's a question for me?
GABE DELAHAYE: Yes.
TOMMY WISEAU: What would it be?
Probably it would be another Dark Knight.
GABE DELAHAYE: You're going to remake Dark Knight?
TOMMY WISEAU: I would not remake it.
Actually, I would play the Joker.
GABE DELAHAYE: Sure.
TOMMY WISEAU: And what I would do, I would probably make
billions of dollars for them.
That's what I would do.
GABE DELAHAYE: Very smart.
BETH HOYT: I mean, that would be a good move on their part.
GABE DELAHAYE: Definitely.
TOMMY WISEAU: They are nice.
So I have very good response from all the industry.
They're very kind, very supporting.
GABE DELAHAYE: From the Dark Knight industry?
TOMMY WISEAU: A lot of actors, part of the industry.
I don't want to mention the name, but you guys probably
know about it.
GABE DELAHAYE: OK, great.
TOMMY WISEAU: But that's what I would do.
Yes.
GREG SESTERO: The Dark Room.
GABE DELAHAYE: The Dark Room?
Perfect.
TOMMY WISEAU: The Dark Room.
Yeah, I'm going to do that.
GABE DELAHAYE: Dark Room Rises.
[LAUGHTER]
TOMMY WISEAU: We'll figure out.
TOMMY WISEAU'S VOICE: I have something for you.
BETH HOYT: Ah, it's from Tumblr.
This is from mrjohnson22.
"From past interviews, it has been explained that spoons and
the Golden Gate Bridge are meant to symbolize the
Industrial Revolution.
What was the reasoning behind including such references to
this particular event in history?" Do
you agree that they--
TOMMY WISEAU: Absolutely, yes.
I don't know if you guys know, for example,
the Golden Gate Bridge.
The time when they built it, one person passed away.
But the Golden Gate Bridge represent--
there was an accident during construction.
Long story short, when we had an earthquake in the Bay Area,
the Golden Gate survived.
This is the technology that we have.
And there's beauty on it.
If you look at when we go back, how technology actually
can build something compared to tday, we go somewhere else.
We have very talented people.
Now, although the spoon I would say, do you know that
wood is cheaper than plastic?
Do you know that expression?
BETH HOYT: I did not.
GABE DELAHAYE: No.
Where is it from?
TOMMY WISEAU: What this means, it's my partial expression.
GABE DELAHAYE: Those are the best.
Those are always the best.
BETH HOYT: I was going to say-- based on numbers.
Cost.
TOMMY WISEAU: No.
It's just you see the technology of
producing the spoon.
If you look way back, it was actually harmful for you.
But today, guess what.
You don't have this chemical for example.
So it's significant--
also progression.
Again, people say, oh god, what he's talking about.
I encourage some of the viewers actually to go back
and say, you know what?
Maybe he is right about it.
GABE DELAHAYE: But now how does that
play out in your movie?
TOMMY WISEAU: It's to symbolize progression over a
generation.
And I'm happy to say that I noticed that people are not
bored with The Room.
Like, for example, today we sold out the
showing at the Sunshine.
BETH HOYT: That's great.
TOMMY WISEAU: Two, three years ago when I was here, the
Ziegfeld event, it was the same.
So we have very great response.
Again, all the fans of The Room, thank you very much.
And hopefully I'll see you at the screening of The Room
tonight or tomorrow, whatever.
BETH HOYT: Do you buy movie snacks when you
go see it at midnight?
TOMMY WISEAU: No.
But I like it.
Usually the people give it to me.
BETH HOYT: Yeah, I can see that.
Tumblr question is from scigraph.
"A question for Tommy and Greg-- what was the most
frustrating part of filming The Room and what
was the most fun?
TOMMY WISEAU: Greg first.
BETH HOYT: All right, most frustrating part, Greg.
Give it up.
GREG SESTERO: I would probably say the most fun was playing
football in tuxedos because I think that's kind of a
once-in-a-lifetime experience that I thought was amazing.
BETH HOYT: Unless someone brings a
football to the wedding.
GREG SESTERO: That's true.
BETH HOYT: When you're taking wedding photos.
GREG SESTERO: That's a good point.
BETH HOYT: And just throw it up.
That would be one other instance that might happen.
GABE DELAHAYE: It wasn't even that great, really.
BETH HOYT: No, just saying that there's hope that that
might happen again for you.
GREG SESTERO: Yeah.
BETH HOYT: But OK.
And the most frustrating?
GREG SESTERO: Frustrating?
I don't know if there's anything that
frustrating about it.
I'd say more hilarious.
GABE DELAHAYE: What about having another actor?
GREG SESTERO: Oh, no.
I know the most part.
Probably using the staircase as a lovemaking zone.
But it worked out.
GABE DELAHAYE: Now Tommy, you did the blocking on that?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes.
Absolutely, yes.
I will tell you one thing that I'm starting
from negative first.
The most frustrating thing was for me to
replace some of the actors.
Because we replaced the crew four times, actors four times.
Because you do the same thing over and then you have to
replace people.
And another frustrating part is that people did not believe
in my project.
Like, for example, they say, we didn't have the script.
As you know, I will release The Room DVD.
And actually, you have a script, 100 pages.
So I don't want to be negative, but that's the
frustrating part.
The good news is that I love to play football.
We have a groovy time.
Everybody did a good job overall.
BETH HOYT: Yes.
GABE DELAHAYE: Great.
BETH HOYT: OK.
Well, we're going to be back with more questions and more
comments in a second.
TOMMY WISEAU: Sure.
BETH HOYT: But first, for those of you who somehow
haven't yet experienced the magic of The Room, here's a
sneak peak.
Check it out.
We'll be right back.
-These are for you.
ANNOUNCER: The best movie of the year.
-I don't love him anymore.
ANNOUNCER: Johnny's my best friend.
This will be our secret.
ANNOUNCER: Experience this quirky, new black comedy.
-You have my money, right?
-I treat you like a princess, and you
stabbed me in the back.
ANNOUNCER: It's a riot.
-You are tearing me apart, Lisa.
ANNOUNCER: A film with the passion
of Tennessee Williams--
The Room.
Directed by Tommy Wiseau.
Rated R. Experience this quirky, new black comedy,
coming soon near you.
GABE DELAHAYE: Perfect.
BETH HOYT: Put the Dogeee.
D-O-G-E-E-E. OK, we're back.
And we figured, what better way to hang out with our new
friends than by tossing a football around standing very
close to each other?
TOMMY WISEAU: Sure.
BETH HOYT: OK, so we want to get to some
more of your questions.
We're just going to keep doing that while we play.
All right, this is from Tumblr.
No throwing to me when I'm reading a question.
That's the only rule.
Anonymous asks, "at the end of the film after you trashed the
apartment, what were you doing with Lisa's red dress and why?
Were Johnny's actions meant to symbolize the loss of love and
deep distress?"
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes, everything is correct.
Why?
Because he's completely
frustrated with life, betrayal.
And he actually realized that's the end.
But the question is, did he actually survive?
He didn't.
And he still tried to love Lisa, and it
didn't come out right.
GREG SESTERO: I think I'm going to use that one next
time-- for revenge.
BETH HOYT: OK, our next question is from Tumblr.
And it's wearethemusic.
"What's the name of the doggie--" spelled--
they didn't know yet.
They did not know yet.
TOMMY WISEAU: Oh, no problem.
BETH HOYT: "What's the name of the doggie in the florist shop
scene?"
TOMMY WISEAU: Dogeee is actually--
we call it D-O-G-E-E-E. That's the name, Dogeee.
And actually, Dogeee has his own Twitter or Facebook.
Or something like that.
GABE DELAHAYE: He has his own Facebook?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes.
BETH HOYT: So his name is D-O-G-E-E-E. Wait, is it two
E's or three E's?
TOMMY WISEAU: Three E's.
BETH HOYT: Gotcha.
Big difference.
All right, a comment now from YouTube.
TOMMY WISEAU: And actually, you know--
let me also say something for fun.
That Dogeee has his own contract.
So we actually paied the Dogeee.
GABE DELAHAYE: Oh, good.
TOMMY WISEAU: Yeah.
So he was a paid actor if you look at it directly.
BETH HOYT: That's great.
TOMMY WISEAU: And we have many takes on him back and forth.
BETH HOYT: Yes.
So animals are treated with respect.
TOMMY WISEAU: Absolutely.
BETH HOYT: And paid properly.
So this question from YouTube is from strongbadmandy.
"Will there ever be a prequel to The Room?"
TOMMY WISEAU: As I said, there may.
Everything is possible.
BETH HOYT: Boom.
GABE DELAHAYE: Tommy--
TOMMY WISEAU: Nobody dropped it yet.
GABE DELAHAYE: Today is my birthday.
TOMMY WISEAU: Today's your birthday?
GABE DELAHAYE: Yeah.
TOMMY WISEAU: Hapy Birthday.
GABE DELAHAYE: No, sorry.
Yeah, I want you to say, happy birthday, Gabe.
You are my friend.
That's my request.
TOMMY WISEAU: OK.
Happy birthday, Gabe.
You are my friend.
You are my future friend or maybe current friend.
No problem.
GABE DELAHAYE: Perfect.
Thank you.
BETH HOYT: Man.
GABE DELAHAYE: That went really well for me.
BETH HOYT: That really worked out.
Good job, Gabe.
GABE DELAHAYE: Thank you.
BETH HOYT: Good job for coming here on your birthday.
GABE DELAHAYE: I'm done.
I can leave now.
BETH HOYT: I'm glad that all worked out for everyone to do
everything.
OK, what's next is a Tumblr question.
This is from amazingtechnicolorinternet.
"Tommy, was it difficult writing, producing, directing,
and starring in the film?
What were some obstacles you had to overcome in
production?"
TOMMY WISEAU: Yeah.
It was difficult, but I did have a system in place.
At the time, we had a signal directly from HD camera to the
daily on the VHS tape.
So I review everything, go back and forth.
My ratio was for one to four.
So each scene we did four times.
Four takes.
BETH HOYT: Four times?
GABE DELAHAYE: Always four?
Every time four?
BETH HOYT: What if you got it in two?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yeah, sometimes it was longer.
Sometimes two.
It just come out right.
BETH HOYT: And then you just knew?
How often did that happen that you were like,
we don't need this?
TOMMY WISEAU: No, usually all the scenes with three, four.
That's the average.
BETH HOYT: And then did you usually ending up taking the
fourth take, do you think?
That was when everyone gave their best?
TOMMY WISEAU: Say it again?
BETH HOYT: Did you usually end up taking the fourth take?
Do think that was when--
TOMMY WISEAU: No, sometimes the middle one.
It's not necessarily the fourth we did better.
BETH HOYT: How often was is the fourth take?
And then, you thought, we should end here because we did
four but you kind of wanted to do another one?
TOMMY WISEAU: Well, you look at the time.
You look at the budget.
If you talk about the producer.
And I was also the producer.
BETH HOYT: Man.
TOMMY WISEAU: So it's very difficult.
You see, again, people don't realize my background is not
just the stage art but also construction.
So I learned a lot of stuff.
So all skills help.
That's what I always say, too, some of the fans of The Room.
GABE DELAHAYE: OK, we have another question from Videogum
from pickpocket.
"How can I play football if I don't have the appropriate
safety gear or regulation field and 21 friends?"
TOMMY WISEAU: Well, first of all, you don't need the
regulation gear.
Number two, you don't need anything.
Like, we're playing right now.
Have a groovy time.
That's it.
And sometimes you do this.
BETH HOYT: Whoa.
TOMMY WISEAU: Sorry.
I'm doing with a certain adjustment.
BETH HOYT: I like it.
No, you're spicing things up.
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes.
BETH HOYT: That's good.
TOMMY WISEAU: So you don't do this.
BETH HOYT: Yeah.
TOMMY WISEAU: Sometimes you do.
GABE DELAHAYE: Did you do a lot of football practice
before the movie just to get the cast in gear?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes, we did.
Actually, you may ask Greg.
We actually play on the street.
GABE DELAHAYE: Yeah.
Get everyone in shape.
GREG SESTERO: Brett Farve was supposed to come on set and
kind of help with throwing motions.
But Tommy decided we had it down.
TOMMY WISEAU: We played also on the snow.
BETH HOYT: Oh, that's always fun.
TOMMY WISEAU: You see, I'm holding.
BETH HOYT: But he had sticky fingers.
GREG SESTERO: Yeah, that's true.
GABE DELAHAYE: Oh, we have another
question from Videogum.
This is from Funtastik.
"How did you perfect the human expression of laughter in your
films?"
TOMMY WISEAU: Hahaha.

Yeah, so it's a part of nature or something.
You do something what is different.
This is my sort of a signature.
Hahaha, how you doing?
GREG SESTERO: It really is.
BETH HOYT: But I want to hear you laugh.
That's how I think you laugh, though.
So your real laugh is different?
TOMMY WISEAU: No, sometimes I'm like, hahahah.
GABE DELAHAYE: OK.
BETH HOYT: And then give me another one.
Do you have another one?
TOMMY WISEAU: Well, if I laugh--
BETH HOYT: What if something strikes you?
TOMMY WISEAU: I have to go in the corner
because I cannot on camera.
GABE DELAHAYE: You should do it.
BETH HOYT: Yeah, take over the corner and--

TOMMY WISEAU: Hah.
BETH HOYT: That's like a laugh-cry.
TOMMY WISEAU: That's my emotion.
BETH HOYT: Yeah.
I mean, I have that too.
I have a laugh-cry.
TOMMY WISEAU: I'm a very emotional person.
GABE DELAHAYE: Sure.
TOMMY WISEAU: And I go by emotion.
I learned this in my acting class.
Stella Adler.
But this is the Jean Shelton from San Francisco.
So she opened up for me.
She's, like, 85 years old right now.
GREG SESTERO: Yeah, I thought she was, like, 100.
TOMMY WISEAU: OK, 100.
Yeah.
GABE DELAHAYE: We have a question from Twitter.
BETH HOYT: We do.
And it is from Nate Bennett.
It's Nate Bennett.
"Hey, Tommy!
If you could learn one new skill, what would it be and
why?" You have so many skills.
TOMMY WISEAU: Oh, that's a good one.
BETH HOYT: What skill don't you have yet?
TOMMY WISEAU: How to fly.
I always wanted to fly.
Yeah, you know what?
Yeah, that's a skill I'd like to learn.
But I have many skills.
BETH HOYT: Fly a plane?
TOMMY WISEAU: Planes.
As well also--
BETH HOYT: Figure out a way to fly?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yeah, a plane, actually.
GABE DELAHAYE: What are some of your favorite skills that
you already have?
TOMMY WISEAU: Organizing.
GABE DELAHAYE: Yeah, that's a good one.
TOMMY WISEAU: Building steel building, which
I can talk to you.
Also design--
I design clothing.
By the way, I do have a line I started September.
We design--
already in the progress.
I already designed.
And I want to correct some of the statements where people
say I equal leather jacket.
That's incorrect statement.
That was actually, I design stuff.
BETH HOYT: I did read that.
TOMMY WISEAU: So for ladies, it will be just a casual
thing, what I'm wearing now.
BETH HOYT: For ladies, you'd have an outfit like this?
TOMMY WISEAU: For ladies, too.
BETH HOYT: Oh, but you like ladies to dress like ladies.
TOMMY WISEAU: Like ladies.
So we have a red dress, for example.
GABE DELAHAYE: But casual.
TOMMY WISEAU: We have similar to what you're wearing.
Some casual stuff.
Not with a big logo of The Room.
No, just my logo, Tommy Wiseau, that's all.
GABE DELAHAYE: And you designed the dog, too?
TOMMY WISEAU: Yes, I designed this for--
actually, that's for her.
BETH HOYT: This is not leaving here
without being in my hands.
TOMMY WISEAU: I was working on this for four months.
BETH HOYT: Wow.
TOMMY WISEAU: And you see, from the beginning.
Just the basic stuff.
BETH HOYT: It's very soft.
TOMMY WISEAU: But it's very soft.
When you touch it, do you know--
can I give you some advice?
BETH HOYT: Yeah, please.
TOMMY WISEAU: If you have some friends--
what they maybe--
BETH HOYT: I didn't--
I am--
GABE DELAHAYE: Oh.
[DOG TALKING]
TOMMY WISEAU: You can click it.
It will shut off.
BETH HOYT: I want to figure out what's wrong.
TOMMY WISEAU: Nothing wrong.
He's barking.
DOGEEE: Hi Johnny, I didn't know it was you.
GABE DELAHAYE: That's not barking, Tommy.
TOMMY WISEAU: It's barking now.
GABE DELAHAYE: That's not what barking sounds like.
It sounds like a baby.
BETH HOYT: Is that a scene in the movie?
GABE DELAHAYE: OK, that's barking.
BETH HOYT: And then I do something terribly wrong.
GABE DELAHAYE: That's not barking.
TOMMY WISEAU: Yeah, but you can do like that.
GABE DELAHAYE: Oh, OK.
BETH HOYT: When I go home tonight, I'm going to turn
this on and I'm going to be really scared about what I've
done to the Dogeee.
GABE DELAHAYE: This is the dog from the movie.
You did like a plaster cast--
TOMMY WISEAU: That's correct.
GABE DELAHAYE: --of the dog.
TOMMY WISEAU: What the idea is what I suggest because we have
a lot of fans that are already buying this stuff--
which I like.
Thank you, guys.
When you, for example, are depressed, something like
that, you push this button.
You hear a couple sentences, whatever.
You shut it off if you want.
And to me, you will feel better.
BETH HOYT: I do.
I did until it revealed that I was hurting.
Until the howling.
TOMMY WISEAU: I get one for you too
because it's your birthday.
GABE DELAHAYE: I know.
I need--
TOMMY WISEAU: You're invited for Sunday
because we're sold out.
But you're invited.
GABE DELAHAYE: I'm invited for Sunday?
TOMMY WISEAU: Free of charge.
GABE DELAHAYE: Perfect.
Thank you so much.
TOMMY WISEAU: If you have time.
GABE DELAHAYE: OK.
BETH HOYT: Cool.
Here's a Twitter question.
And it's from Don Cald--
"what does Mr. Wiseau think about the #yolo lifestyle?"
GABE DELAHAYE: Do you know about YOLO?
TOMMY WISEAU: What is that?
GABE DELAHAYE: It means You Only Live Once.
TOMMY WISEAU: Oh, that's good.
You know what?
You have to make your own decision.
Be good to each other.
I would say one sentence.
If a lot of people loved each other, the world would be a
better place to live.
BETH HOYT: That's a good thing to live by.
OK.
Next Twitter question-- this is one more Twitter question
from BudCort.
"What country are you rooting for in the Olympics?"
TOMMY WISEAU: Huh, are you kidding me?
USA.
Please.
BETH HOYT: Well, that solves that.
Greg, what about you?
GREG SESTERO: Yeah, I'd stick with USA.
BETH HOYT: What's your favorite Olympic sport?
What?
TOMMY WISEAU: Shame on you.
GREG SESTERO: Oh, he thinks I'm rooting for France, but--
BETH HOYT: Why do you think that?
GREG SESTERO: Because I'm--
TOMMY WISEAU: He has a dual passport.
GREG SESTERO: I like the men's basketball.
BETH HOYT: Yeah?
I think that you've picked a good country
to root for, then.
GREG SESTERO: Yeah, I think they're going to win every
game by 50 points.
GABE DELAHAYE: You mean the greatest country in the world.
BETH HOYT: That one.
GABE DELAHAYE: Yeah.
TOMMY WISEAU: Which one?
GABE DELAHAYE: United States of America.
TOMMY WISEAU: Of course.
GABE DELAHAYE: Number one.
The number one country.
TOMMY WISEAU: They don't want to admit it.
French--
I used to live in France.
The French, we have always, like, sort of--

you know what I'm saying?
BETH HOYT: No.
GABE DELAHAYE: No.
TOMMY WISEAU: Well, the French, want the entire world
to speak French.
It didn't come out right, as you know--
NATO, et cetera.
GABE DELAHAYE: Because we don't all speak French.
TOMMY WISEAU: Now everybody speaks English
wherever you go.
But guess what.
The last time I was in France--
that was a few months ago--
they actually speak good English.
BETH HOYT: You guys--
TOMMY WISEAU: They're nice people.
BETH HOYT: That's all the time we have So today.
GABE DELAHAYE: Oh.
BETH HOYT: Spiked it.
Thank you so much to Tommy and Greg for stopping by.
Tommy, I have something for you.

Thank you for bringing that Dogeee.
TOMMY WISEAU: Thank you very much.
GABE DELAHAYE: If you do live in the New York City area,
check out the weekend midnight screenings of The Room at the
Landmark Sunshine Theater in Manhattan's Lower East Side.
Tommy and Greg will be there in person.
TOMMY WISEAU: Thank you very much.
GABE DELAHAYE: And if you can't be there live, go to
theroommovie.com for all things Wiseau.
BETH HOYT: And if you're new to My Damn Channel and want to
know more about the stuff we do here, check out this video.
Thanks for watching.
We'll see you next week.
Thank, guys.
TOMMY WISEAU: See you guys.
Thank you very much.
BETH HOYT: Ladies and gentlemen, David Wain.
It's David Cross, you guys.
Jon Glaser.
The Gregory Brothers.
It's Retta.
Dave Hill.
And hello, Wyatt Cenac.
Michael Showalter.
Steve Rannazzisi.
It's Max Silvestri.
It's Gilbert Gottfried.
Christian Finnegan's here.
It's Kurt Braunohler, Adira Amram.
You guys, it's Eugene Mirman.
Reggie Watts.
REGGIE WATTS: [SINGING].
Breakdown.
BETH HOYT: Whoever wins this chair will get the most
attention from me.
MALE SPEAKER: Wow.
JON GLASER: Bouqet of subs.
BETH HOYT: Oh, for me?
REGGIE WATTS: You feeling this?
BETH HOYT: Yeah.
REGGIE WATTS: Bass line.
STEVE RANNAZZISI: It's all happening out loud.
KURT BRAUNOHLER: Get out of the way, buddy.
This is fun.
FEMALE SPEAKER: So kids, you want safety first.
REGGIE WATTS: Yo, yo.
Beth on My Damn Channel.
My Damn Channel.
My damn, damn channel.
BETH HOYT: Is that cold?
GABE DELAHAYE: It feels great.
BETH HOYT: Let's start the day over.
DAVID WAIN: Oh, well, now that is a nice touch.
BETH HOYT: I just have regular questions.
I mean, we're just going to talk through it today.
STEVE RANNAZZISI: OK.
Are they about sex?
BETH HOYT: Well, the first one kind of.
So you have two young boys?
STEVE RANNAZZISI: Yep.
BETH HOYT: Children?
You seem to feel one way or another about Skittles?
MICHAEL SHOWALTER: I'm a peanut M&M's man.
EUGENE MIRMAN: Just like when someone plays, say, a sexual
offender on Law & Order, they don't go, well, this is what
I've always wanted to do.
REGGIE WATTS: I don't drink all the time.
I'm not rah!
BETH HOYT: I don't drink all the time.
And I don't ever talk like that.
REGGIE WATTS: Like I do on My Damn Channel's show.
I'm going to drink a lot before I go on camera.
[LAUGHTER]
RETTA: I was really excited to hear that Valerie was
choreographing this piece.
I feel like once they see this, they're going to be
like, let's bring it.
Retta--
bring her on.
VALERIE: Retta is awesome.
She didn't even have to move.
RETTA: I don't know that I have a process.
I kind of just feel the music, and my body takes over.
KURT BRAUNOHLER: First question, what can
I get you to drink?
BETH HOYT: A seltzer?
KURT BRAUNOHLER: Use your buzzer, please.
Beth!
BETH HOYT: A seltzer.
KURT BRAUNOHLER: Judges?
Haha, correct.
FEMALE SPEAKER: I want to see everybody at home dancing.
Yeah.
And if you're at work, dance even harder.
Come to my pizza party.
I will get your pizza started.
You will get my pizza started.

BETH HOYT: Today, we are going to make--
MAX SILVESTRI: Deviled eggs.
BETH HOYT: --ice cream sundaes.
MAX SILVESTRI: What?
BETH HOYT: Yeah, that's good.
MAX SILVESTRI: I love cooking.
I love eating.
BETH HOYT: Is this a voodoo doll.
Are you trying to kill Christian?
FEMALE SPEAKER: Yes.
KURT BRAUNOHLER: That's how we have real fun.
Russian roulette.
BETH HOYT: Oh, gosh.
You can't do Russian roulette on YouTube.
KURT BRAUNOHLER: What!
Why not?
It's just one bullet.
BETH HOYT: No, no.
So now it's time to get all 2.0 and respond to your live
tweets and your YouTube comments and all that stuff.
And the first thing we have is from Facebook.
It's a question.
DAVID CROSS: I know Facebook.
I know Facebook.
BETH HOYT: He knows it.
It's from Stacey Parek. "Will he have another collaboration
with Bob Odenkirk?"
DAVID CROSS: Bob and I are actually going to publish a
series of our sketches and scripts that never got made.
BETH HOYT: That's so exciting.
FEMALE SPEAKER 1: is Nicki Minaj.
Ooh.
I want to see this.
FEMALE SPEAKER 2: heard one song.
FEMALE SPEAKER 1: OK, you can do this.
Start that clock.
FEMALE SPEAKER 2: Draw my eye.
Here we go, fry.
My Damn Channel LIVE, what, what, what.
MICHAEL SHOWALTER: Oh, you go ahead.
BETH HOYT: No, I want you to read it in that voice.
MICHAEL SHOWALTER: Is Michael a brown gravy or a white gravy
kind of a guy?
Great question, Bilbo.
And the answer is, I like wavy gravy.
BETH HOYT: That's the answer.
REGGIE WATTS: What up?
Me nacoro is Reggie Watts.
DAVID CROSS: Hi, I'm David Cross.
MICHAEL: Hey, I'm Michael Showalter.
DAVID WAIN: Hi, I'm David Wain.
GABE DELAHAYE: Hi, I'm Gabe.
MAX SILVESTRI: And I'm Max.
GILBERT GOTTFRIED: Hi, I'm Gilbert Gottfried.
RETTA: Hi, my name is Retta.
WYATT CENAC: Hey, this is Wyatt Cenac.
ADAM COROLLA: Hi, I'm Adam Corolla.
JON GLASER: Hi, I'm Jon Glaser.
EUGENE MIRMAN: Hi, I'm Eugene Mirman.
STEVE RANNAZZISI: Hey, I'm Steve Rannazzisi.
DAVE HILL: Hi, I'm Dave Hill.
CHRISTIAN FINNEGAN: I'm Christian Finnegan.
KURT BRAUNOHLER: I'm Kurt Braunohler.
GREGORY BROTHERS: We're the Gregory Brothers, and you're
watching My Damn Channel LIVE.