Translating Math and Word Statements


Uploaded by MuchoMath on 02.08.2008

Transcript:
>> Professor Perez: Hey!
This is Professor Perez from Saddleback College, again!
What we're going to do today is work more on translations, meaning we are going
to translate word statement to math and math to word statements.
And of course, we cannot get started without our student of the semester, and that's Charlie!
He better be ready to go!
Hey, Charlie, you ready to go?
>> Charlie: Yeah!
>> Professor Perez: All right, we're doing translations today!
Your favorite subject!
That's right, okay, here we go, right there!
Here's our first translation.
We're going to translate this word statement to math.
Okay, Charlie, here we go.
What does the sum mean?
>> Charlie: Addition.
>> Professor Perez: Addition, that's right.
We'll put an addition.
Now, what are we taking the sum of, what are the two things we're taking the sum of?
>> Charlie: x and 8.
>> Professor Perez: x and 8.
There you go!
That's it!
Let's do another one!
All right, here we go, Charlie, we have the quotient, now don't get scared!
Charlie, what does the quotient mean?
>> Charlie: Division!
>> Professor Perez: Division, that's right.
So we'll put our division symbol there.
Now, what are the two things we're taking the quotient of?
>> Charlie: 49 and 7.
>> Professor Perez: 49 and 7, very nice.
Now yes, we could write this quotient as a fraction,
where 49 is the numerator and 7 is the denominator.
But we're not worried about that right now.
We'll get to fractions soon enough!
Okay, Charlie, are you ready?
Now, oh by the way, we're not concerned about the answers right now, although 49 divided
by 7 is 7 for those of you that want to know.
But we'll get to that later.
Okay? We just want to write the word...
the math statements.
So here we go Charlie, here goes another one.
Now, this is the product, what does product mean, Charlie?
>> Charlie: Multiplication.
>> Professor Perez: Multiplication, very nice.
Now, there's different ways of noting that you have a multiplication problem.
Here we're going to use the little dot.
Now you could use the little x if you want, but we'll start with this.
The dot means the product.
Okay, Charlie, now, what are the two things we're taking the product of?
>> Charlie: 8 and negative 7.
>> Professor Perez: Very nice there!
8 and negative 7.
Okay, now, Charlie, do we need that dot in front of the parenthesis?
>> Charlie: No!
>> Professor Perez: No.
Now remember, if you put a number, that 8, outside the parenthesis,
there is no operation indicated, but when you have a number outside the parenthesis,
it implies that you have what operation, Charlie?
>> Charlie: Multiplication
>> Professor Perez: Multiplication, so, there's two ways to write this math statement,
as the product of 8 and negative 7.
Either way is fine.
Okay, Charlie, let's do another one here, let's step it up a bit.
Here we have the difference of 6 and the product of 2 and 3.
Don't get scared, just read and translate.
Okay, Charlie, we have a difference.
Now, what does difference mean?
>> Charlie: Subtraction.
>> Professor Perez: Subtraction, very nice there.
Okay, we have our subtraction, now what are the two things that we are subtracting?
>> Charlie: 6 and the product?
>> Professor Perez: That's right, 6 and the product!
So we get that far, and we take a break.
Phew! Okay, right here we have the difference of 6 and the product.
Now, the product.
What are the two things we're taking the product of, Charlie?
>> Charlie: 2 and 3.
>> Professor Perez: Very nice!
The 2 and the 3, and there you go!
That's your answer there!
All right, that was a tough one, huh?
Well let's to another one!
Here we go, Charlie!
The quotient of 6 and 2, subtracted from negative 3.
So take a break.
Okay, let's go!
Charlie, what does the quotient mean?
>> Charlie: Division!
>> Professor Perez: Division, that's right, okay, so we have our division there.
Now, what are the two things we are taking the quotient of?
>> Charlie: 6 and 2.
>> Professor Perez: That's right, it's just 6 and 2.
Okay, now take a break.
Phew! Okay, now, it's the quotient of 6 and 2, subtracted from,
so this quotient is being subtracted from, or taken away from, what, Charlie?
>> Charlie: Negative 3?
>> Professor Perez: A negative 3, that's right.
So, the subtraction has to go in front.
Now, you can't just put the subtraction there,
you have to put a parenthesis saying there's the quotient of 6 and 2,
and that quotient is being subtracted from,
so notice we put the subtraction symbol out in front, okay?
Now, subtraction symbol's there, now this quotient is being subtracted from what, Charlie?
>> Charlie: Negative 3.
>> Professor Perez: Negative 3, there we go.
And that is our answer.
Ooh! That was a tough one!
All right now, we've finished translating word statements to math, so let's go the other way!
Let's translate math statements to word statements.
Here we go, Charlie.
a plus b. Now, is this a sum, a quotient, a product, or a difference?
>> Charlie: Sum!
>> Professor Perez: It's a sum, right?
It's the sum.
It is the sum of what two things?
>> Charlie: a and b.
>> Professor Perez: a and b, there you go!
That's it!
Let's do another one!
Here we go, Charlie.
Right there.
Now, what is this?
>> Charlie: The quotient.
>> Professor Perez: It's the quotient.
It's the quotient of what two things?
>> Charlie: x and 3.
>> Professor Perez: x and 3, there you go.
The quotient of x and 3.
Very nice there, Charlie!
Now let's do this one over here, don't get scared!
What is this, Charlie?
A sum, a difference, a product, or a quotient?
>> Charlie: Product.
>> Professor Perez: It's the product, that's right.
It's the product of what two things, Charlie?
>> Charlie: Negative 8 and 5.
>> Professor Perez: Negative 8 and 5, that's it.
That's all you've got to do.
Okay, let's continue on.
Here we go, Charlie.
Now we have this one, don't get scared!
Now, there's actually two ways you can say this or write this
as a word statement, so, just relax.
We'll do this problem two different ways, watch.
Okay, Charlie, now, what do you see, is this a difference, a product, a quotient, or a...sum?
>> Charlie: There's two things there!
>> Professor Perez: Yeah, there's two things there.
You see a product and a difference, okay.
So here we go.
Let's start with a difference.
Now, this is a difference of two different things, Charlie.
It's a difference of what?
>> Charlie: 6 and a product?
>> Professor Perez: That's right.
It's the difference of 6 and a product.
The difference of 6 and a product, but it's the product of what two things, Charlie?
>> Charlie: 2 and 3.
>> Professor Perez: 2 and 3.
Very nice!
So this is a tough one.
This is the difference between 6 and the product of 2 and 3.
Now, let's try this another way, and I'll lead you through this one, Charlie.
Here we go.
Or we could write this as the product of 2 and 3 is being subtracted from, what, Charlie?
>> Charlie: 6.
>> Professor Perez: 6.
That's right.
Now, this is a tough problem here, so you've got to practice at these.
So don't get scared, and don't give up!
You can do this!
Especially you!
>> Charlie: Wha?
>> Professor Perez: All right, Charlie, let's do one more problem.
Okay, here we go.
This one right here.
Now don't get scared.
Now, tell me what you see first, Charlie.
>> Charlie: Sum!
>> Professor Perez: Okay, the sum of what two things?
>> Charlie: 6 and the quotient?
>> Professor Perez: 6 and the quotient.
Very nice.
Now, the quotient of what?
>> Charlie: 6 and 3.
>> Professor Perez: 6 and 3.
Very nice!
And that's it!
Here's another way!
And I'll lead you through this one.
We could start with the quotient.
This is the quotient of 6 and 3, added to, so it's the quotient of 6
and 3 being added to, the what, Charlie?
>> Charlie: 6.
>> Professor Perez: To the 6.
There you.
So, two different ways of answering that.
Anyway, those are some tough problems there, so don't get scared, just keep working,
and we'll see you all again soon.