NW Profiles: Extra Special Elves


Uploaded by kspstv on 03.01.2011

Transcript:
NEXT ON NORTHWEST PROFILES, MEET A MONTANA COUPLE THAT
THRANSFORMS DRIFTWOOD INTO CHARATER ART, VISIT A SPOKANE
CAFÉ WITH A RECIPE FOR BUILDING COMMUNITY, REVISIT THE RETURN OF
AN AMERICAN ICON TO NORTH IDAHO, AND STEP INTO A WOODEN TOY
WORKSHOP WITH SANTAS SENIOR ELVES. IT'S ALL RIGHT HERE ON
NORTHWEST PROFILES.
HELLO AND WELCOME TO OUR DECEMBER EDITION
OF NORTHWEST PROFILES I'M LYNN VELTRIE YOUR HOST FOR A FUN
FILLED HALF HOUR OF TRAVEL AND DISCOVERY, VISITING SOME OF THE
MORE FASCINATING PEOPLE AND PLACES THAT DEFINE THE INLAND
NORTHWEST. SPOKANE, COEUR D'ALENE AND WESTERN MONTANA ARE
AMONG OUR DESTINATIONS SO WITH OUR STORIES IN CUE LETS GET
STARTED SHALL WE? FOR OUR FIRST STORY WE MEET SOME TALENTED
TOYMAKERS NOT FROM THE NORTH POLE BUT FROM RIGHT HERE IN
SPOKANE. THEY'RE CALLED THE ROCKWOOD ELVES AND THEIR MISSION
IS TO HELP MAKE CHRISTMAS MERRY FOR SOME VERY SPECIAL CHILDREN.
Im Bob Manning and Im the Head Elf for the Rockwood Elves here
at Rockwood Retirement Community. The Rockwood Elves
are a group of five men here at Rockwood Retirement Community in
Spokane who had an interest to one degree or another in
woodworking and got together and started making toys for the
Marines Toys for Tots program. We concentrate on making wooden
toys that can be distributed for disadvantaged families at
Christmastime. The Rockwood Elves consist of Bill Paulson,
Lynn Jackson, Jack Harvey, Harry Hendron, Jerri Hawkes who does
our painting for us and myself. Being a Rockwood Elf is kind of
unique. None of us are professional woodworkers. I was
facilities management, we have pipefitters, law enforcement,
mechanical engineer, its pretty diverse but none of us are
professionals. Woodworking was a hobby for all of us. We work one
day a week for a couple of hours and the goal is to make as many
toys as we can and we try to do is we try to maintain a high
level of quality. We started out in 2008 I think we probably only
made 30 or 40 toys. Last year it got a little bit bigger and this
year we set a rather high goal for ourselves of 200 toys. That
in itself is really not to accurate because like little
train that we made this year has 4 cars and some of the other
toys have multiple pieces so if you begin adding up the pieces
it really approaches 8 or 900 pieces. We make a variety of
toys, pull toys for little toddlers, dinosaurs, frogs, we
made a chicken this year that has a ball in it that when you
pull it the chicken the ball rolls. We ve made trains, we ve
made rocking horses, we made carousels, we made a little
truck here its a little low-bed truck and trailer with race cars
on it and then another very similar truck with a trailer
that has a bulldozer on it. What we try to do is make toys that
have a little action to them. That seems to appeal to the
kids.
This shop here at Rockwood Community is for the residents
I had purchased tools for
myself to use in my garage and that really
wasnt satisfactory so I made a deal with Allan Currier, the CEO
of Rockwood that if he would commit to supporting the shop
operation I would donate my tools which I did. Rockwood
itself gives us tremendous support. Anything we need we go
talk to them and weve never been turned down for anything
they buy all of our lumber for us and without them it would
really be pretty tough.
I got an erector set when I was about 4
or 5 years old and that had a great influence of me because I
became a construction manager it ultimately led me to my
profession, I love to build things and the toys that we make
provide a chance for the kids to use their imagination. I have
always enjoyed working with wood for as long as I can remember. I
really enjoyed making toys for my grandchildren thats how it
got started and Ive got grandchildren that are 30 years
old and believe it or not they still got the toys in their
closets and hopefully theyll go on to our great grandchildren.
My wife and I have been so fortunate throughout our lives
with our children and so forth and we see the joy that they
received in getting the toys and so forth that it just makes me
very happy that I am able to do that and spread that joy to
other families.
I cant imagine what Christmas would be like
without toys for the kids. To me it s an impossible situation and
as long as I'm able to I'll do what I can to make sure that
never happens.
All 5 of the fellas that work here we all
have that same objective, to make toys and make kids happy at
Christmastime.
I hope the kids get as much joy out of the toy
as the Rockwood Elves gets in making the toy.
YOU KNOW THEY SAY A TOY IS NOT A TOY UNTIL IT HAS A CHILD TO LOVE
IT. FOR BOB MANNING AND HIS CHRISTMAS CRAFTSMEN THEIR YEAR
ROUND EFFORT TO MAKE HANDMADE WOODEN TOYS IS TRULY A LABOR OF
LOVE. YOU KNOW IT'S OFTEN SAID THAT WE SHOULD THINK GLOBALLY
AND ACT LOCALLY. WITH THAT IN MIND WE MEET A CALGARY WOMAN WHO
MOVED TO SPOKANE, AND OPENED A DIFFERENT KIND OF LOCAL CAFÉ,
ONE WITH A GLOBAL MIND-SET.
One World Spokane is a café with a purpose. Patrons enjoy unique
cuisine prepared from local, conscientiously grown food. now
our onions. (Sizzle) That's the sound you're looking for, the
immediate sizzle, as well as classes and events designed to
improve the community. One World Spokane was founded by Janice
Raschko. Janice had moved from her native Calgary to Spokane.
And though she doesn't eat much processed or fast food, she
found herself gaining weight and developing allergies to foods
like chicken. I can eat chicken in other countries. I've been in
several countries throughout the world. I don't have a problem
with chicken there, it's only when I come back to the U.S. so
there is something there. And I've had that personal
experience. And I've also talked to some people who are fairly
new immigrants to the U.S. from other countries, whether it's
Russia, or Scandinavia or anything like that, they have
similar stories to me, which is really interesting. Janice began
researching how food is produced in the U.S. She became convinced
that many times, food production seems to favor economy over
quality. Unfortunately there's a cost to other things, like our
health ultimately, so the food is cheap production but
eventually there is going to be a cost to the environment and to
our bodies. So, it's not going to be so cheap. It just appears
that way. So Janice decided to do something about it. It was at
the exact same time that I was learning about the food system
that I read about the One World concept. I would say One World's
mission is to educate people about local, sustainable,
healthy food and also to advocate for that within the
community. The result is One World Spokane, which is unique
in many ways. The café prides itself in serving high quality,
locally produced food. We do get some food donated but we do buy
most of our food because the farmers need to make a living.
So we're happy to buy the food from the farmers. One World is
also unique because it has a revolving menu. We have a system
of no set menu, which means that we only have the food that's in
season, what's available, what's easy to get. Then we have people
choosing their own size, their own plates. So they choose how
much food they're going to eat. And because they do that, we
don't see a lot of food being thrown away. Like, the typical
restaurant's 40% food waste, we're probably less than 5% food
waste. One World patrons are allowed to pay whatever they can
afford for their meal. We have a suggested price. And for some
people, that suggested price will be more than what they
typically can afford in their own budget. And it might be a
lot less. So some people pay a little bit less, some people pay
a little bit more. Some people don't have any money. So they
can volunteer in exchange for a meal, which is true food access
and security. Because they will never, ever be turned away.
There will always be food. And we believe that people want the
opportunity to feel like they're a part of something, that
they're not getting something for free. And we're getting
somebody that's helping us to provide the food, whether
they're working in the garden, whether they're working in the
kitchen, they could be cooking. We can provide skills for them
if they need skills to go out and get a job. We provide that.
So it's just making sure we're taking care of every single
person in the community, no matter who they are, or what
they're socio-economic background is. It doesn't
matter. Everybody's welcome and everybody has a place. One World
also offers workshops on topics like composting, beekeeping and
raising chickens. And it is growing a community garden. The
neighborhood kids come by and they love to poke around in
there and ask what that is. People have said to me "it's all
open here. What if someone just comes in and takes some of the
vegetables?" And I always go "that's a great thing" that
someone wants to steal vegetables. I love it. I've seen
people walk by, a homeless person walk by and grab a tomato
and eat it. And that makes me feel really good. Our chef will
go out in the morning, pick everything fresh right out of
the garden, bring it in and cook it for people. I mean, there's
nothing more pure than that.
Yes, there's some flavor there.
People have said to me that it feels like at home to them. And
that makes me feel really good because that means they're
comfortable. And they're, I mean food is a great social
experience that when people eat together it provides
nourishment. But it provides nourishment for their soul, as
well.
IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT ONE WORLD
SPOKANE IS BEING LOOKED AT BY OTHER CITIES AND COUNTRIES AS A
MODEL FOR THEIR OWN FOOD PROGRAMS. LETS TRAVEL NOW INTO
BEAUTIFUL NORTH IDAHO...WHERE MAJESTIC BALD EAGLES ARE MAKING
THEIR ANNUAL VISIT TO LAKE COEUR D'ALENE MORE SPECIFICALLY THE
NORTH EAST CORNER OF THE LAKE AT A SPOT CALLED WOLF LODGE BAY.
IT'S AN EVENT LIKE NO OTHER FOR BIRD WATCHERS SEEKING A RARE
LOOK AT THIS AMERICAN ICON.
DRIVING DOWN BUSY I-90 THROUGH COEUR D'ALENE YOU MIGHT NEVER
KNOW SOME OF THE BEST BIRD WATCHING AROUND IS JUST AN EXIT
AWAY. WHAT MAKES THIS UNIQUE PERHAPS IS THE ACCESSIBILITY --
CLOSE TO TOWN WITH THE HIGHWAY THE PEOPLE CAN DRIVE UP TO WHERE
THE EAGLES ARE AND THEY DO. HERE AT HIGGINS POINT-- THE BALD IS
EAGLE IS AS CLOSE AS YOUR CAR. BRIAN WALKER IS ONE OF THOSE WHO
CAME AND CHECKED OUT THE EAGLES. THEY WERE HANGING AROUND IN THE
TREES AND IF YOU WERE WATCHING YOU COULD SEE THEM FLY OVER THE
WATER JUST A BEAUTIFUL SIGHT WITH THE WINGS SPREAD OUT. THE
SIGHT SO IMPRESSED THIS POST FALLS RESIDENT HE RETURNED TWO
WEEKS LATER AND BROUGHT HIS SON-- EIGHT YEAR OLD CASEY. I
SAW A BIG EAGLE FLY OVER THE WATER. LIKE THE
BIRDS-- TOURISTS FLOCK TO THIS SPOT ON THE LAKE FOR A LOOK AT
THE ONCE ENDANGERED BALD EAGLE. OUR BIRDS LOCALLY START ARRIVING
AROUND THE MIDDLE OF NOVEMBER ONES AND TWOS AND SMALL GROUPS
AND EACH WEEK MORE ARRIVE THEY ARE PRETTY MUCH GONE FROM HERE
BY FEBRUARY. SCOTT ROBINSON WITH THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
HAS BEEN COMING HERE FOR THE PAST 18 YEARS TO COUNT THE
BIRDS. WE'VE HAD AS FEW BIRDS AS TEN AND AS MANY AS 156 ON
ANOTHER MORE RECENT WINTER. SCOTT'S NOT SURE HOW LONG THE
EAGLES HAVE BEEN LANDING HERE. HIS OFFICE STARTING TRACKING THE
BIRDS IN 1974. THEN IT WAS SIMPLY FOR RESEARCH. NO ONE
REALLY PAID MUCH ATTENTION UNTIL 1991- THAT'S WHEN THE B-L-M
STARTED INVITING PEOPLE OUT TO WATCH THE EAGLES. WORD SOON
SPREAD. SO SCOTT STARTED TRACKING NOT ONLY THE BIRDS--
BUT THE SIGHTSEERS. HE DID IT BY ASKING THEM TO SIGN A GUEST BOOK
AND INCLUDE THEIR ZIP CODE. FIFTY AMERICAN STATES AND 36
FOREIGN COUNTRIES WHO HAVE SIGNED IN OUR LITTLE BOOK SO
THAT IS PRETTY EXCITING. ABOUT 70 PERCENT OF THE PEOPLE COME
WITHIN A 3 HOUR DRIVING DISTANCE. FROM THE PARKING LOT
AT HIGGINS POINT YOU CAN GET A PRETTY GOOD VIEW OF THE MAJESTIC
BIRDS. BINOCULARS HELP--- BUT EVEN WITHOUT THEM IT'S
SPECTACULAR. I THINK THIS IS AWESOME -- THIS IS ABOUT MY 9TH
DAY DOWN HERE SO AM I JUST TRYING TO GET SOME GOOD SHOTS
JUST BEING OUT HERE IS PRETTY AWESOME-- THERE IS REALLY
NOTHING BETTER IT DOESN'T MATTER IF IT 30 DEGREES OR 5 BELOW ZERO
IT IS PRETTY PHENOMENAL.
ITS BECAUSE OF THE EAGLES IS THAT I DO WHAT I DO IM A
PROFESSIONAL FREEFALL PHOTOGRAPHER
I TAKE PICTURES OF SKY DIVERS FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS.
AND I WAS INSPIRED BY THESE BIRDS RIGHT HERE.
HOW DO YOU TOP THAT HUH? FREEDOM AT ITS FINEST.
WITH SCOTT AS OUR GUIDE-- WE HIKED
BACK AROUND THE LAKE TO GET A BETTER LOOK. WHEN YOU GET CLOSE
TO THEM YOU INVADE THAT PERSONAL SPACE THEY GET AGITATED-- THAT
IS WHY WE ENCOURAGE OUR EAGLE WATCHERS TO ALWAYS GIVE THE
BIRDS PLENTY OF SPACE WE ENCOURAGE THEM TO USE BINOCULARS
OR THE TELEPHOTO LENS ON THE CAMERA.
THE BALD EAGLES ARE MORE OF A SCAVENGER THAN THEY
ARE AN ACTIVE PREDATOR. WE KEPT OUR DISTANCE.
THEN WAITED. SO WHEN YOU HAVE BIRDS IN FEW NUMBERS YOU HAVE TO
BE A LITTLE PATIENT ALOT OF TIMES PEOPLE WILL ASK WHEN IS
THE BEST TIME TO SEE THE BIRDS --- IT COULD BE ANYTIME OF THE
DAY. AND ON THIS DAY THE EAGLES DIDN'T DISAPPOINT. OF COURSE IT
HELPED TO HAVE SCOTT BY OUR SIDE POINTING OUT EACH EAGLE AS IT
ENTERED THE GROVE OF TREES.
SO THIS WOULD BE A TYPICAL POSE OF
BIRD PERCHED ON A TREE ,BIRD CHIRPING OCCASIONALLY YOU HEAR A
SQUAWK AS THEY TALK TO EACH OTHER.
WE WATCHED AS AN EAGLE
CIRCLED THE LAKE-- THEN SWOOPED DOWN AND SNATCHED A SALMON. ONLY
TO RETURN MOMENTS LATER TO ITS PERCH HIGH ON THE HILL TO DINE
ON THIS LATEST CATCH. IN THE MORNING AT SUNRISE THEY WILL
COME TO THE WATER'S EDGE AND THEY WILL START TO FISH AND
THEY'LL GO UP TO THEIR FAVORITE PERCH TREE AND DIGEST AND THEN
LATER IN THE DAY THEY'LL COME UP AND GET ANOTHER FISH GO TO A
TREE EAT AND DIGEST. EAGLES NEED TO EAT ONE TO TWO POUNDS OF FISH
A DAY. KOKANEE SALMON SPAWN HERE EACH WINTER. WHICH MAKES
THIS LOCATION IDEAL. AND SO WHEN THE KOKANEE DIE OFF THE
BECAME A FORAGE A GROCERY STORE FOR THE BALD EAGLES. AS THE
SALMON SUPPLY DWINDLES SO DO THE BIRDS-- WHO CONTINUE THEIR
MIGRATION TO SOUTHERN IDAHO AND UTAH. BUT THEY'LL BE BACK TO
TRANSFORM THIS QUIET MISTY LAKE -- INTO AN EAGLE SANCTUARY.
KEEP IN MIND, BESIDE WATCHING THE
EAGLES FROM LAND YOU CAN ALSO VIEW THEM FROM ABOARD A CRUISE
BOAT THAT TAKES PEOPLE FROM THE COEUR D' ALENE RESORT TO WOLF
LODGE BAY. NOW FOR OUR FINAL STORY WE FOLLOW THE ROAD TO A
PICTURESQUE YET REMOTE LOCATION IN NORTHWEST MONTANA. THERE WE
MEET A CREATIVE COUPLE WHO FASHION ART FROM RIVER WOOD, A
MATERIAL WHOSE WATER FASHIONED FEATURES ENHANCE THE WHIMSICAL
NATURE OF THEIR CREATIONS.
In secluded Northwestern Montana, near the town of Heron,
a witty form of art takes shape with the help of a lively
husband and wife, who combine their talents and create.
(Monica Archer) Welcome, we're the Archers, come in and meet
our family. (Dale Archer) First of all we have Barney our
resident naked Cowboy; he's down to his barrel and his bottle,
that's about all he has left. Now we have Ace our gambler,
kind of a shifty looking dude. Then we have our resident
Montana fly fisherman, Skeeter. Now we have St. Nick, he's all
ready for Christmas, and my all-time favorite, Buck with a
fly on his nose, he doesn't know whether to shoot or swat that
fly. Then we have Turtle John with his tomahawk and his rattle
and pipe. (Monica) All of these wonderful characters are made
out of driftwood, and then we like to enhance them with any
type of old item that we can, for example the brims are made
out of old nail buckets the hat bands are made out of old horse
harnesses the neighbors have given us and then we like to
embellish the characters with antiques if at all possible and
each one is an intricate part of our family. Dale and Monica
Archer like being green. Trudging along the banks of the
nearby Clark Fork River, unique pieces of wood worn from erosion
are selected and gathered together to help the Archers
form their one-of-a- kind creations. (Dale) We've always
been outdoors people the best times of life are out walking
the rivers out in the woods. (Monica) Usually we have a
character in mind when we're hunting for driftwood so we're
looking for certain pieces of wood that will let that
character become a being. (Dale) You have to have the ability to
see the character in the Driftwood, driftwood is
especially tricky because there's all different shapes and
sizes grains (Monica) check out this piece, Nice! (Dale) it's
all varied. (Monica) Many people think that we bring home every
piece of driftwood but we might walk five or 6 miles and bring
home only one piece. [Dale] Beauty is floating around in the
rivers and a lot of times going to waste and we try to bring it
to life. And we just absolutely love working with it we've
worked with it close to 30 years now Back at home in his shop,
Dale begins to carve on a piece of wood destined to be the head
of one of their characters. [Dale] I watched my grandfather
whittle out toys for me when I was just four or five years old
and it kind of took with me and I discovered that I did have an
ability to whittle and carve and to make something out of
nothing. It takes quite a bit of patience a lot of time and a lot
of work. This is an example of a piece I found the other day, it
just an awesome awesome piece. This will be his hat, I'll cut
it off here and make a white band for a Santa. His face will
be in here, he already has his arms, his torso, I'll have to
add feet and a base, but basically he's an awesome piece
already. [Monica] Dales always been artistic, I think that
after being married to someone for so many years it kind of
just rubs off so we kind of make a good team we are always
looking for the same things. We have a real close relationship
we work 24 seven together I'm great at detailing Dales good at
carving we both work together on design. [Dale] We work as a team
we work seven days a week 24 hours a day and we absolutely
love it I couldn't work with anyone else. Detail plays an
important role in the Archer's creations, Take this
commissioned piece of a firefighter requiring meticulous
work. Facial features copied from an image are combined in
the final piece. Detail in the accessories also plays an
important role, right down to the water dripping from the
nozzle. Downtime from the creative process is a great time
for the archers to market their products, as they move from
event to event. [Monica] I think that you have to have a sense of
humor if you want the characters to be humorous and you want your
public to get that when they walk in your booth that each
character is part of your family and humorous and it makes the
customers laugh I love that aspect of the delight on their
faces when they see the characters. The wood has been
good for the archers, helping them carve a lasting
relationship between themselves and their creations. [Monica] We
are very remote we like that, we like the quietness the
peacefulness the serenity when we come home from doing the show
on the weekends those are just times to chill out look at the
beautiful view the peacefulness around us.
IF YOU WERE WONDERING, THE ARCHER'S
SAY EACH OF THEIR PIECES CAN TAKE UP TO 8 WEEKS TO COMPLETE,
AND MOST OF THAT TIME IS SPENT CARVING WONDERFUL DETAILS INTO
THE FACES OF EACH CHARACTER. SO, WITH THAT OUR SHOW IS COMPLETE,
AS ALWAYS THE SUCCESS OF THIS PROGRAM DEPENDS ON VIEWERS LIKE
YOU AND YOUR STORY IDEAS... SO, IF YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE LET
US KNOW, STAY TUNED TO FIND OUT HOW. ALSO, IF YOU WOULD LIKE
MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ANY OF THE STORIES YOU'VE JUST SEEN GO
TO OUR WEBSITE AT KSPS. ORG. UNTIL NEXT TIME THIS IS LYNN
VELTRIE FOR THE ENTIRE NORTHWEST PROFILES PRODUCTION TEAM SAYING
SO LONG AND REMEMBER, LIVING IN THE SCENIC NORTHWEST THERE'S
ALWAYS PLENTY TO EXPLORE JUST MAKE SURE WHEN YOU DO, YOU TAKE
TIME TO ENJOY THE VIEW.