Access 101


Uploaded by VERMONTCAM on 27.09.2010

Transcript:
Put simply, community access is a publicly accessible
alternative to commercial media outlets.
Throughout Vermont, local citizens are using digital
media tools to reach out and interact with their neighbors
and government representatives - on cable
television and online - through the use of Vermont's
community media centers.
These centers are operated by local non-profit
organizations in cooperation with Vermont cable television
providers, and offer training and access to
state-of-the-art digital video tools and software at
little or no cost to the public.
In addition, Vermont's community media centers
operate community access television channels, which
are dedicated to showcasing local public, governmental
and educational programming, produced primarily by local
citizens.
There are presently 25 community media centers
across Vermont, from the large centers in Chittenden
County to smaller ones such as Windsor On Air and
Hardwick Community Television.
Throughout the state, citizens can watch their
local town meetings, church services, and school events
on any of the more than 40 community access TV channels
operated by these centers.
Individual citizens can learn how to use professional video
production tools, borrow video equipment, utilize
editing facilities and broadcast their work on TV.
Local nonprofits use community media centers to
educate the public about their missions and services.
In Bristol, citizens got engaged in a controversy over
a proposed gravel pit in the center of town by watching
the debate unfold on their TVs.
In Burlington, a high school junior made a documentary
about reactions to Vermont's gay marriage law and had it
shown at film festivals across the country.
In Montpelier, citizens can see their selectboard
meetings online, and click through to specific agenda
items that affect them personally.
In Brattleboro, the Windham County Human Society reported
an increased interest in pet adoption after a program
featuring the organization ran on local community access
TV.
Electronic media is more a part Vermonters' lives than
ever before and Vermont's community media centers can
help bring these communities together in new and exciting
ways.
But these centers don't exist unless the community requests
them.
For more information, go to vermontaccess.net/access-101