Blaschka Case (Family App)


Uploaded by corningmuseumofglass on 22.09.2011

Transcript:
bjbj Stop 282 Family tour Blashka Case Narrator: This is the story of two remarkable people
- Leopold Blaschka and his son Rudolph. This whole entire case is filled with the things
they made. Kid 2: They made all of this out of glass? Kid 1: I can understand why you
d want to buy a glass bowl or vase to have in your house, but what in the world would
you do with a glass octopus? Narrator: You might not want an octopus or a sea slug made
out of glass, but Leopold and his son did what nobody had done before. They started
a very specialized business. David: In the 1860s, natural history museums were opening
up all over Europe and North America. And no one knew how to display soft-bodied creatures
that don t have any backbones. The senior Blaschka found the solution, and he began
to make and sell to museums completely lifelike models of creatures like octopuses, and sea
anemones, and corals, and sea slugs. His aim was not to make beautiful objects. His aim
was to be totally scientifically accurate because these were museum display objects,
and then they became teaching objects in colleges that taught natural history. Kid 2: I think
they re beautiful! Look at all those little tentacles on the sea anemone. Kid 1: Maybe
in a weird Bill Nye the Science Guy kind of way. But what about those eyeballs? Those
aren t sea creatures. David: They were also pursuing other sidelines. They made dozens
upon dozens of glass eyes. They made glass eyes for people, and they made large glass
eyes for large stuffed animals in natural history museums. Kid 1: I see different plants
and flowers too. Narrator: Well, their business was so successful that the Blaschkas were
asked by Harvard University to try something new. They needed some help teaching classes
in botany that s the study of plants. David: It was the same idea as with the animals.
The models of plants had to be minutely accurate, representing the living plants as closely
as possible so that professors could teach their students about them. And the result
of the two careers of the father and the son is this zoo of animals, this collection of
plant specimens that are really unlike anything else in the world. [Content_Types].xml Iw},
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folHlink="folHlink"/> Stop 1 Family tour Morgan Cup Linda Normal Mandy Kritzeck Microsoft
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Family tour Blashka Case "Arial "Century Gothic Times New Roman "Arial Narrator: This is the
story of two remarkable people Leopold Blaschka and his son Rudolph.o This whole entire case
is filled with the things they made. "Arial Kid 2: They made all of this out of glass:
"Arial "Arial "Arial "Arial "Arial Kid 1: can understand why you d want to buy a glass
bowl or vase to have in your house, but what in the world would you do with a glass octopus
Narrator: Youo might not want an octopus or a sea slug made out of glass, but Leopold
and his son did what nobody had done before. They started a very specialized business.
"Arial "Arial "Arial "Arial "Arial David: In the 1860s, natural history museums were
opening up all over Europe and North b America. And no one knew how to display soft bodied
creatures that don t have any o backbones. The senior Blasch ka found the solution, and
he began to make and sell to museums completely lifelike models of creatures like octopuses,
and sea anemones, and corals, and sea slugs. His aim was not to make beautiful objects.
His aim was to be totally scientifically accur ate because these were museum display objects,
and then they became teaching objects in colleges that taught natural history. Kid 2: think
they re beautiful! Look at all those little tentacles on the sea anemone. Kid 1: Maybe
in a weird Bill Nye h the Science Guy kind of way. But what about those eyeballs? Those
aren t sea creatures.o David: They were also pursuing other sidelines. They made dozens
upon dozens of glass eyes. They made glass eyes for people, and they made large glass
eyes for h Arial rgei stuffed animals in natural history museums. Kid 1: I see different plants
and flowers too. Narrator: Well, their business was so successful that the Blaschkas were
asked by Harvard University to try something new. They needed some help teaching clas ses
in botany that the study of plants. David: It was the same idea as with the animals.
The models of plants had to be minutely accurate, representing the living plants as closely
as possible so that professors could teach their students about them . And the result
of the two careers of the father and the son is this zoo of animals, this collection of
plant specimens that are really unlike anything else in the world. Stop 1 Family tour Morgan
Cup Stop 282 Family tour Blashka Case Title Headings _AdHocReviewCycleID _EmailSubject
_AuthorEmail _AuthorEmailDisplayName _ReviewingToolsShownOnce transcripts for the family audio tour SchwartzAJ@cmog.org
Schwartz, Amy J. Microsoft Office Word 97-2003 Document MSWordDoc Word.Document.8