Month In Review Briefing - December 2012


Uploaded by NWSPendleton on 08.01.2013

Transcript:
Welcome to the Month in Review briefing! This briefing will highlight the weather of December
2012 as well as the temperature and precipitation outlooks for the month of January 2013.
  This graphic is from the High Plains Regional
Climate Center and shows the departure from normal temperatures for the month of December
2012. The time period for the normals is 1981-2010. A value of zero would mean that the location
reported a normal average temperature. All of eastern Washington, and most of northern
Oregon reported near to above normal temperatures with some locations in the lower Washington
Columbia Basin as much as 7 degrees above normal. Locations in central Oregon reported
near to a few degrees below normal average temperatures.
The next graphic is also from the High Plains Regional Climate Center. This shows the percent
of normal precipitation for the Northwest for the month of December 2012. A value of
100% means that the location reported their average monthly total precipitation. Most
of south central Washington and portions of central and northern Oregon reported near
to above normal monthly precipitation totals with some areas as much as 200% of normal
in south central Washington. Portions of central and northeast Oregon and southeast Washington
reported near to below normal monthly precipitation totals for the month of December.
A strong winter storm moved through the Pacific Northwest on December 16th through the 17th.
Tightening southerly pressure gradients ahead of the cold front led to an increase in winds
the night of the 16th. The strongest winds occurred with the cold front in the early
morning hours of December 17th.
In the Columbia Basin of Washington, weather spotters reported trees and power lines down
in Dayton and near Walla Walla. Trees were reported down in Burbank, and in the Tri-Cities
area. It was reported that 100 public trees were blown over in the city of Richland. Reports
of damaged road signs, shingles, and fences also came in from around the Tri-Cities area.
The following are selected wind gust reports from around the region during the wind event.
The weather sensor 3 miles north of Joseph, Oregon reported a wind gust of 64 mph at 1140
pm on the 16th. The weather sensor 4 miles west-southwest
of College Place, Washington reported a wind gust of 62 mph at 305 am on the 17th.
The weather sensor on Rattlesnake Mountain in Washington reported a wind gust up to 100
mph at 315 am on the 17th. The weather sensor in Benton City, Washington
reported a wind gust to 83 mph at 459 am on the 17th.
The weather sensor 1 mile northwest of Richland, Washington reported a wind gust to 76 mph
at 5 am on the 17th. The weather sensor at the Boardman Coal Plant
in Oregon reported a wind gust to 99 mph at 5 am on the 17th.
The weather sensor at the Pasco Airport in Washington reported a wind gust to 70 mph
at 515 am on the 17th. And, the weather sensor 3 miles north-northeast
of La Grande, Oregon reported a wind gust to 62 mph at 955 am on the 17th.
For six stations in our forecast area, the year 2012 ranked in their top 10 wettest calendar
years on record.
Pelton Dam in Oregon reported 2012 as the 9th wettest on record with 13.25 inches of
precipitation for the year. The wettest year on record for Pelton Dam is 1996 with 20.05
inches of precipitation.
Walla Walla, Washington reported 2012 as the 6th wettest on record with 23.41 inches of
precipitation for the year. The wettest year on record for Walla Walla is 1981 with 26.68
inches of precipitation.
Meacham, Oregon reported 2012 as the 5th wettest on record with 40.73 inches of precipitation
for the year. The wettest year on record for Meacham is 1971 with 41.79 inches of precipitation.
Redmond, Oregon reported 2012 as the 5th wettest on record with 11.61 inches of precipitation
for the year. The wettest year on record for Redmond is 1998 with 13.82 inches of precipitation.
Bickleton, Washington reported 2012 as the 4th wettest on record with 21.50 inches of
precipitation for the year. The wettest year on record for Bickleton is 2010 with 22.82
inches of precipitation.
And Heppner, Oregon reported 2012 as the 3rd wettest on record with 18.72 inches of precipitation
for the year. The wettest year on record for Heppner is 1942 with 19.08 inches of precipitation.
And now we will turn our attention to the forecast for January 2013.
This graphic is issued by the Climate Prediction Center or CPC and is the Temperature Outlook
for the month of January. The cool colors indicate a greater chance of below normal
temperatures and the warm colors represent a greater chance of above normal temperatures.
The time period for the normals runs from 1981-2010. The western portion of the forecast
area is forecast to have a greater probability of below normal average temperatures for the
month.
The eastern portion of the area is under an area called “Equal Chances”. This means
that the probability of the most likely category cannot be determined and the expected likelihood
of above, below, or near normal temperatures doesn’t differ from the climatological odds
of 33.3% for each category. This graphic is CPC's Precipitation Outlook
for the month of January. The green colors represent a greater chance of above normal
precipitation, and the brown colors represent a greater chance of below normal precipitation.
The Pacific Northwest is under an area of Equal Chances.
  Please keep in mind that these are probabilities
of averages, and that the day-to-day weather will still vary for the month of January.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  This concludes our briefing. Please continue
to visit National Weather Service web pages for the latest weather information including
watches, warnings and advisories. Thank you for your time.