Video 07 - Primary: Young Learners


Uploaded by UOregon on 05.12.2012

Transcript:
Thank you, Kieran.
And I...forgot my cup.
Okay, we are going to do today --
everybody at your table has a salmon expert,
somebody who read with me today about salmon
and who will be able to tell you
the information you need to know about salmon.
The first question -- don't do heads together yet, hold on.
They are going to tell you what class of animal
the salmon belongs to.
Ready? Heads together.
[ children speaking indistinctly ]
Okay, one, two, three, eyes on me.
Red number three.
- Boy: Bony fish. - Teacher: It's a bony fish.
Yeah, there are some fish
that don't have what we consider bones.
They might have cartilage like sharks.
They are bony fish.
Okay, the next question for your group
is what is the habitat of the sockeye salmon?
Ready, heads together.
-- and streams... to oceans.
- Okay, you say. - Everything.
I don't know.
Teacher: One, two, three, eyes on me.
Blue number four.
- Girl: Streams. - They live in streams.
And we want a little bit more information, too,
about where they live.
Let's see, purple number four.
You're number four.
- (whispers) Streams. - And streams.
Teacher: Okay, they live in streams and...
- Oceans. - Teacher: Oceans.
And what biome do we find them in?
It's something we've been studying.
Ready? Heads together.
Ocean.
Okay, one, two, three, eyes on me.
Green number...two.
- Rivers. - Rivers is one of the biomes.
Also, I'm going to go ahead and just put it up here,
we've been doing temperate forests.
Remember, these are all temperate forest animals
we've been doing, okay? We've been studying.
So rivers, you're right.
But also we want to put up here
they've been in temperate forests,
northwest temperate forests.
Okay, our next question
is what is a sockeye salmon's food source?
What does it eat? Heads together.
Zooplankton and insects.
Zooplankton and insects.
Okay.
[ indistinct conversations ]
Teacher: Ready? Black number four again.
Boy: Insects.
Teacher: They eat insects. And what else?
Boy: And zooplankton?
Teacher: Zooplankton, mm-hmm.
Okay, our next question:
why are sockeye salmon threatened or endangered?
Ready? Heads together.
[ overlapping conversations ]
Logging.
Bulldozing.
"Gray-vel"...gray...vel.
What is it again?
Gravel digging...
[ speaking in Spanish ]
Ero...sion.
- "Erision." - Division. I'll say that.
Okay, one, two, three, eyes on me.
Green number two.
Green number two.
- Girl: Erosion? - Teacher: Erosion.
Right, because of erosion.
And we also want to talk about what causes that erosion
and then what does that erosion do.
Ready? Heads together.
- Where are we? - I don't know.
Right here, right here.
[ speaking indistinctly ]
One, two, three, eyes on me.
Yellow...number one.
Dirt gets into the water and, um...
and covers the little gravel.
Right, the soil from the erosion...
from when they log or mine, it covers the gravel
where they lay their eggs in the streams.
Good.
Next question: why are salmon important to the forest?
Ready? Heads together.
Why? Why?!
Native birds of prey.
Native birds of prey.
Why?
That doesn't even make -- why?
Ocean.
To the ocean, streams, and rivers.
Get it?
No, that doesn't even make sense.
It protects the river?
No, the ocean, the streams, and the rivers.
Ocean, streams, and the rivers?
Yes.
One, two, three, eyes on me.
Purple number two.
Also brings from the ocean to the rivers.
Teacher: What does it do?
It brings nutrients.
Okay, they bring nutrients.
Okay, and they have another importance
beside bringing nutrients from the ocean to the river.
Talk to your group about that. Ready? Heads together.
[ speaking indistinctly ]
What is it?
Well, I think it's that one.
[ speaking in Spanish ]
Interesting factors.
Swim miles home.
Nutrition from the ocean. Nutrition from the ocean.
Nutrition from the ocean.
Nutrition from the ocean. Nutrition, right?
Okay, one, two, three, eyes on me.
Orange number three.
Salmon...travel... thousands of miles.
Teacher: Okay, now that's something interesting
that we can put down here.
Okay, that's good information, but we're looking for --
let's do heads together again at your table --
for why else are they important to the forest?
Jonathan, help your group out with that, okay?
[ speaking indistinctly ]
- Food for... - Bears.
Providing food to bears and...
large birds of prey.
Provide food...
Providing food to bears...
And large birds of prey.
Teacher: Evangelina, do you have it now?
What else -- why are the salmon important to the forest?
What animals eat the salmon?
Bears and long birds of prey.
Teacher: Right, bears and birds of prey in the forest
often eat the salmon, so they're also important.
They depend on the salmon as a food source.
Okay, our last question,
and there's more than one answer to this.
You're going to tell what is an interesting fact,
something else interesting about the salmon.
Ready? Heads together.
[ overlapping chatter ]
Salmon travel thousands of miles...
and they have the ocean home...
and sense of smell.
So the salmon travels a lot of miles?
Salmon travel thousands of miles.
Okay, one, two, three, eyes on me.
Red -- shh -- number one.
What is an interesting fact about the salmon?
The salmon travels thousands of miles.
Teacher: They do, they travel thousands of miles
from where they're born, out to the ocean, and back.
And I think we are done now with our process grid.
So what we're going to do next is we are going to do
two chants, two of our forest chants,
and when you hear the signal word, "interdependence,"
you will walk up to the chant, okay?
And I have Super Scientist Awards
for some of the people that I see doing a really good job
while we're doing our chants,
people who are solving problems, making good decisions,
and showing respect.
Ready? Interdependence.
Remember not to go too fast on this song.
Sometimes we're so used to the beginning part
that we go a little fast.
One, two, three.
All: ♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Have to have a habitat to carry on ♪
♪ Well, the forest is a habitat ♪
♪ A very special habitat ♪
♪ It's where the tallest trees are at ♪
♪ It's where a bear can scratch your back ♪
♪ It keeps the earth from rolling back ♪
♪ Prevents erosion that's a fact ♪
♪ The forest is a habitat we depend on ♪
♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Have to have a habitat to carry on ♪
♪ Well, the tree is a habitat ♪
♪ A very special habitat ♪
♪ The roots are where the voles are at ♪
♪ Bark feeds the fungi that's a fact ♪
♪ When it dies it's still a home ♪
♪ A place that insects call their own ♪
♪ The tree is a habitat we depend on ♪
♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Habitat, habitat have to have a habitat ♪
♪ Have to have a habitat to carry on ♪
Teacher: Good job, you guys.
When you hear the signal word, we will walk to the next chant.
Ready? Interdependence.
And would you please hand it to a girl
who's raising her hand quietly?
One, two, three, faster than me.
And I wanted to give a Super Scientist Award to Luis,
because he was over there --
and I know that his reading group came to get him,
but he very quietly solved that problem
of quietly letting them know
and going back and singing again.
Thanks, Luis.
Okay, one, two, three.
All: ♪ I can spell tree T-R-E-E ♪
♪ I can spell snag S-N-A-G ♪
♪ I can spell home H-O-M-E ♪
♪ But I can't spell interdependence ♪
♪ I can spell soil S-O-I-L ♪
♪ I can spell rain R-A-I-N ♪
♪ I can spell food F-O-O-D ♪
♪ But I can't spell interdependence ♪
♪ I can spell log L-O-G ♪
♪ I can spell bug B-U-G ♪
♪ I can spell rot R-O-T ♪
♪ But I can't spell interdependence ♪
♪ Yes, I can Yes, I can ♪
♪ I-N-T-E-R-D-E-P-E-N-D-E-N-C-E Interdependence ♪
Teacher: Oh, you guys did such a nice job.
I really liked -- I could hear Alex singing the whole time.
Good job, Alex.
Okay, please go back to your seats quietly.
Each of you is going to write --
I like how Alex is paying attention. Thank you, Alex.
Boy: Shhh.
Thank you, Yelitza.
Okay, your team is going to write a sentence
about sockeye salmon.
And we're waiting for Araceli and José Luis to be listening.
Okay. I will give the paper to the person at the table
who is going to write it, but that doesn't mean
they're the only person who's going to make up the ideas.
They just have to write it down. Okay?
And then in about five minutes, we're going to come together
and look at our paragraph, our sentences, together.
Oh, let's see, Jorge, your group is going to write about
what animal -- you're going to write a sentence
to let the readers know
what animal we're writing about, okay?
Gabriela, your table group is going to tell
what class the sockeye salmon belongs to,
what class of animals, okay?
Alicia, your table group is going to write
about one of the habitats of the sockeye salmon, okay?
Alphonso, your table is going to write
about what the sockeye salmon eats, okay?
Alex, your table is going to write about why --
one reason sockeye salmon are endangered.
And, Araceli, your table group is going to write
about why sockeye salmon are important to the forest.
And here, Yelitza, your table group will write
an interesting fact, okay?
So you need to help the person at your table group
come up with a sentence.
What can we write?
- Sockeye salmon are bony fish. - Bony.
Yeah, all that.
Just write "Sockeye salmon are bony fish."
Teacher: You need to write a sentence
that tells what we're writing about.
What are we writing about?
What are we studying today on the process grid?
[ children whispering ]
Don't forget your capitals and periods in your sentences.
You guys are just doing the introduction sentence,
the topic sentence, okay,
to tell what animal we're dealing with.
[ whispering indistinctly ]
River or ocean?
What do you like, river or ocean?
- River. - River.
Let's check if it's right.
"The sockeye salmon lives in the river."
"Live" or "lives"?
- Lives. - Lives.
"Lives in the river."
Okay, "The sockeye salmon lives in the river."
Teacher: You have about one more minute to finish up your sentence.
Rivers.
The rivers?
- Rivers. - Rivers.
Teacher: You finished?
You don't need to put your name on it.
[ speaking in Spanish ]
Plankton and...
[ speaking in Spanish ]
Yeah.
Teacher: Okay, I need your sentence on the count of 10
if you haven't finished it.
One...two...three...
four...
five...
six...
seven --
Jasmine, how's it coming?
- It's the same. - It's the same one, okay.
Araceli? You don't have one written yet?
Okay, write it on that side and then bring it up.
Hey, shh.
Boys and girls, when you hear the signal word,
I need you to come and sit right up here.
We need to make kind of a little circle.
Ready? Oh, I didn't say the signal word yet.
That's okay. Interdependence.
Sit up, please.
Okay, waiting for Araceli's table and Yelitza's table.
Okay, so today when we're editing our paragraph,
we're going to check for capitals and periods --
are they where they need to be --
but we're also going to edit to see if it sounds right, okay?
Make sure it sounds right.
So our first sentence says -- this is our topic sentence,
and I indented a little bit, just like in Spanish
when we put a<i> sangraron.</i>
Okay, when you start a paragraph,
you put an indentation.
It says, "We are learning about sockeye salmon."
Does that sound right?
- No. - Yes.
Teacher: It is right.
Now, do we have a capital where we need a capital?
Children: Yes.
And a period where we need a period?
- Children: Yes. - Okay, good.
Next, "Sockeye salmon are bony fish," okay?
So that's telling about the class of the fish.
- Does that sound right? - Children: Yes.
Is there a capital where we need one?
Children: Yes.
- A period where we need one? - Children: Yes.
Does anybody see any extra capitals up there?
Raise your hand if you see some extra capitals.
Luis?
I'm sorry?
- Andrew? - The K.
Oh, the K, right.
I know. Some of that is just we forget when we're writing
and use big letters instead of little letters.
Also...
Girl: Salmon. Salmon, it has two capitals.
Teacher: You know, I'm wondering if it's because it's the name
of a species of an animal.
Maybe we can have capitals. I'm not sure.
Okay, the next sentence.
"The sockeye salmon travel thousands of miles."
- Jonathan? - It needs to say "travels."
"The sockeye salmon<i> travels</i> thousands of miles."
Well, actually, this is okay, but the way you're saying it --
if you're talking about one salmon, you could say,
"The sockeye salmon<i> travels"</i> if it's one salmon.
But if it's also more than one, you would say as a group,
"The sockeye salmon<i> travel."</i>
That sounds okay, okay?
We have a capital, right? And a period.
Okay, there's a -- the K.
The K. Okay, so we'd want to make that a lowercase.
Okay.
Now, "Because of erosion caused by mining."
I see we have a capital and a period,
and we have some good information here.
- Does it sound right? - Children: No.
Raise your hand if you have another way
you think we could say it
so it would sound like a complete sentence.
Alex, what was your group supposed to tell?
You were supposed to tell why they are...?
Alex: Why they are endangered.
Teacher: Why they are endangered, okay.
So do you think you could put that in here
to make it sound like a complete sentence?
This is a good answer,
"Because of erosion caused by mining,"
but we want a complete sentence.
So they are...
Alex: They are endangered.
Okay, "They are endangered because of erosion
caused by mining and logging." Good.
Okay, and so what happens to this B right here?
Alex: It's small.
Okay, we need a lowercase, a smaller B,
because it's now the middle of our sentence.
All right.
"The sockeye salmon eats zooplankton."
- Does that sound right? - Children: No.
[ overlapping comments ]
The K!
Okay, but we're just looking right now to see,
does it sound right?
- Uh-uh. - No.
- "The sockeye salmon eats" -- - Boy: I see four capitals.
If it was one sockeye salmon, it "eats,"
but if it's many sockeye salmon, they...
"eat," okay?
So, "The sockeye salmon eats zooplankton" --
I bet there's some on the back, "and insects,"
and they've got their period right there.
Good job.
Boy: They have too much capitals.
Okay, so you would make this a lowercase S? Okay?
- And the K. - And the K, okay.
- And "zooplankton." - All right.
- Boy: Zooplankton. - Zooplankton?
Oh, we have a big K there, all right. Okay.
Let's move on to the next one.
"The sockeye salmon lives in the rivers."
Gabriela?
Sockeye salmon<i> live</i> in the rivers.
Teacher: Okay, the sockeye salmon<i> live</i> in the rivers.
Okay, because it's more than one salmon.
And we're waiting for our last group.
Do they have their sentence finished?
You know, I think we're going to have to just stick
with these six sentences.
Boy: Teacher, the capital K of sockeye.
Teacher: Okay.
Okay, since we don't have our last sentence yet,
let's think of one as a group.
I'm going to grab a paper.
What would be a good way to end our paragraph about salmon?
Who could think of a good way
to end our paragraph about salmon?
Boy: "I like to study salmon."
Okay, we could say, "I like to study salmon."
- Boy: "I love salmon." - Teacher: "I love salmon."
Boy: I like to eat the salmon.
Teacher: "I like to eat the salmon," okay.
Boy: "Salmon are tasty."
"Salmon are very important to us."
Ah, "Salmon are very important to us."
Okay, does that sound like a good one to end with?
- Children: Yes. - Okay.
"Salmon...are...very...
important...to us." Good job, you guys.
Okay, let's read together what we have written.
Look, they are done. Okay, well, we will have to look at that.
Let's see, we can squeeze this in, I guess.
"The salmons are important to the forest
because it gives" -- okay.
Okay, we'll stick that one right in here.
Okay, so let's read together. Ready?
All: "We are learning about sockeye salmon.
Sockeye salmon are bony fish.
The sockeye salmon travels thousands of miles.
They are endangered because of erosion caused by mining.
The sockeye salmon eat zooplankton.
The sockeye salmon live in the rivers.
The salmon are important to..."
Let's see.
"the forest because it gives nutrients
to the ocean and rivers."
And, "Salmon are very important to us."
Teacher: Good job, you guys.
Teacher, can you check ours?
Did we check yours?
No, honey, because we kind of ran out of time to check yours,
but I did put it in there.
We could look at it later, okay?
Okay, when I say the signal word,
please head back to your seat.
Ready? Interdependence.
[ children chattering ]