Nutrition Through the Lifecycle: Senses


Uploaded by famsciEIU on 12.01.2012

Transcript:
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Hi I'm Maggie Stock, and I am an Eastern Illinois Dietetics
Graduate Student.
And today I'm going to be talking about the five senses in
relation to food and nutrition.
First I'm going to do a brief overview of what
I have here on my plate.
The first thing I have are sunflower seeds, sunflower seeds
are high in magnesium, vitamin E, and selenuim which are good
for your brain, heart and DNA repair.
The next thing I have on my plate are apples, the pectin in
apples help reduce your LDL or bad cholesterol.
And we all know the saying an apple a
day, keeps the doctor away.
The next thing I have on my plate is whole grain cereal,
whole grain cereal can help reduce cholesterol and reduce
the risk of heart disease, cancer, can diabetes.
The last thing I have on my plate are onions, despite the
pungent odor onions help prevent the risk of cardiovascular
diseases, cancer, and infections.
They also are cholesterol free and contain little sodium.
For the first sense we're going to be talking about taste.
The tongue has four primary senses on it.
Bitterness, sourness, saltiness, and sweetness.
Bitter food such as coffee are usually tasted in
the back of the tongue.
Sour foods like lemons and limes are usually tasted
in the middle sides of the tongue.
Salty food such as salted sunflower seeds or potato chips
are usually tasted in the front sides of the tongue.
And sweet foods like candies and cookies are usually tasted in
the front of the tongue.
Just by looking at this plate you can tell that the sunflower
seeds are tasted on the front sides of the tongue.
The next sense we're going to be talking about is touch.
Here I have a pineapple and just by touching it and not looking
at it you can tell that there are rough sides on it.
Kiwis have a fuzzy outside on it, and
apples have a smooth outside.
These are some of the many textures that fruit contain.
Pineapples have high amounts of vitamin C and manganese, which
is good for energy production and fighting off infections.
Kiwis also have alot of vitamin C.
You can use touch to determine if the fruit is ripe.
For example, if you are looking at an avocado it should be not
firm but not too soft.
It should be right in the middle.
The next sense we are talking about is smell, we all know that
there are good, bad, strong, and weak smells.
Which component on the plate do you
think has the strongest smell?
If you said onions, you are correct.
This is because of the sulfur-containing compounds in
onions like what eggs have.
The next sense we are talking about is seeing.
With our eyes we can see all the different colors of fruits,
oranges, watermelon, apples, and peaches.
We can also see if a fruit is good and ripe.
For example, bananas that have brown spots might be too ripe.
Bananas contain lots of potassium, which are good for
blood pressure, and they also help absorb calcium, which could
be good for bone health later in life.
The last sense we are talking about is hearing.
Here I have two cans, can you tell me which component on the
plate is in this can?
[shaking noise]
If you said the sunflower seeds, you are correct.
What about this can?
[shaking noise]
If you said the apples, you are correct.
Thank you for listening to me, and thank you for being such a
sensational learner.
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