Musicians@Google: Michael Franti


Uploaded by AtGoogleTalks on 30.06.2010

Transcript:
>>presenter: Hello, everyone.
>>audience: Hello!
>>presenter: Thank you very much for coming today.
This is actually the first time I've
hosted a Musicians@Google event, so bear with me.
I'm a little bit nervous, but I could not be happier to
have the honor of introducing today's guest.
We're incredibly fortunate to have him with us today for
an acoustic performance and he'll be sticking around
for a bit to answer your questions after,
after the show.
So, you can submit questions or you can vote on questions
at go/askfranti, alright?
Michael has been well known to area music fans for well over
20 years and has earned a truly international following
during that time.
He's built a reputation for tremendously energetic and
positive performances that often combine sharp social
commentary with a fusion of countless musical styles
including, but absolutely not limited to reggae,
hip-hop, rock, folk, jazz, and if you listen closely,
even a few metal riffs here and there.
Michael and his band, Spearhead, are perhaps best known
to San Franciscans and Bay Area natives in general,
for their Power to the Peaceful Festival,
which is a free event that draws tens of
thousands to Golden Gate Park each year for two magical days
in music, and social awareness.
They've been a fixture on the national fe-,
festival scene as well, with appearances at Bonnaroo,
Coachella, the Taos Solar Music Festival
and the New Orleans Jazz Fest, just to name a few.
Michael and Spearhead are currently touring in support
of their forthcoming album, The Sound of Sunshine,
which will be released on August 24th
and he'll be appearing here in the Bay Area
at the Greek Theatre in Berkeley on July 16th.
So, on behalf of mu-, Musicians@Google,
it is my great pleasure to
welcome Mr. Michael Franti to the stage.
[applause and clapping] [whistle]
>>Franti: Thanks so much for having us here today
and I brought my buddy, Jay, with me to play guitar.
Jolene here to sing with us and my son is here, Ade, and--
[clapping] [guitar strumming]
it's a big part of his summer vacation to be out here.
[guitar strumming] And I'll play a couple songs.
Then I guess we'll do some, some questioning and answering.
But I've always thought that it would be really cool to
do shows where instead of the people asking the performers,
[uses deep voice] "Would you please turn off
your cell phone or devices?"
That it would be the opposite; that at our shows
people would go there and they'd turn on their phones
and they'd use their phone interactively during the show,
so please feel free to type away [laughs] at your computer
or take pictures or film or blog or vlog or if you wanna
come up here and sing and film it while we're doin' it--
[audience laughs] or do a dance behind us,
or like, [strums guitar] anyway, here we go.
One, two, three, come on.
[upbeat guitar music]
Put your hand together, ya'll.
"I wake up in the morning its six o'clock
They say there may be rain but the sun is hot
I wish I had some time just to kill today
And I wish I had a dime for every bill I got to pay
Some days you lose you win
And the water's as high as the times you're in
So I just back in where I learned to swim
Try to keep my head above it the best I can
That's why, here I am, waitin' for this storm to pass me by
That's the sound of sunshine comin' down
That's the sound of sunshine comin' down
Ay, ay, ay, ay, ay, ay, ay, ay"
One, two, put your hands together now
"I saw my friend Bobby. He said 'what's up man.
You got a little work or 20 to lend' I opened up my hand
he said 'I'm glad to see They can take away my job
but not my friends.'
You see and here I am, waitin' for this storm to pass me by
That's the sound of sunshine comin' down
That's the sound of sunshine comin' down"
Google, tell me how you feelin' y'all
"I wanna go where the summer never ends
With my guitar on the beach there with all my friends
The sun's so hot and the wave's in motion
And everything smells like suntan lotion
The ocean and the girls so sweet
So kick off your shoes and relax your feet
They say that miracles are never ceasin'
Every single soul needs a little releasin'
Stereo bumpin' till the sun goes down
And I only wanna hear that sound
That's the sound of sunshine comin' down
Yeah, that's the sound of sunshine comin' down"
Boogie rock that guitar
[guitar solo]
Give it up for Jake Boogie on the guitar, ya'll
"You're the one I wanna be with When the sun goes down
You're the one I wanna be with When the sun goes down
You're the one I wanna be with When the sun goes down
You're the one I wanna be with When the sun goes
That's the sound of sunshine comin' down"
There you go
"That's the sound of sunshine comin' down
Ay ay ay ay ay ay ay Ay ay ay ay ay ay ay"
I wanna hear ya'll sing it now "That's the sound of
[mouths the words] sunshine comin' down"
[applause] A little louder.
[sings] "That's
[mouths the words] the sound of sunshine comin' down
[sings] Yeeeeaaaaaah!" [fast guitar strumming]
The Google Tabernacle Choir
in attendance.
[laughter and applause] All right.
[more upbeat guitar music]
"Oh you're perfect just the way you are, just the way you are
Oh you're perfect just the way you are, just the way you are
Shake it, shake it, shake it - come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me
Shake it, shake it, shake it - come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me now
Shake it, shake it mama, you the one for me
I'm realizin you the only one that's meant to be
And when I wake up in the mornin' all I wanna see
Is the sun that is shinin on you next to me
You got a little broken nail, got a hair outta place
A little bit of extra middle right around the waist
With all of them things I never ever hesitate
'Cause the thing about you baby is the smile on your face
Blowin' kisses at you girl, I hope they didn't miss
The way you move your body made it hard for them to hit you
I wish you would come a little closer
Rub a little closer mama See it mama closer
So shake it, shake it, shake it - come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me
Shake it, shake it, shake it, come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me now
Shake it, shake it, shake it Shake it, shake it, shake it,
you the one for me
Shake it, shake it, shake it" How you feelin', ya'll?
"I got love for you baby, never givin it up
I love the way you love me, never gettin enough
I love the way you shake that little extra bit of butta
When I see you move your body, girl it makes my heart a flutta
When I see you dance upon the living room floor,
on the kitchen table Better open up the door
Bring the party to the street
because the street will love her more
The people love the beat, and the beat will love her more
With the music blastin, the people clappin,
the speakers shakin, the kids will take it
You're perfect, just the way you are -
you're perfect just the way you are
Shake it, shake it, shake it - come mama
Shake it, shake it shake it, you the one for me
Shake it, shake it, shake it - come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me now
Shake it, shake it, shake it Shake it, shake it, shake it
Shake it, shake it, shake it- come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it
I said, oh, you're perfect just the way you are,
just the way you are
Oh, you're perfect just the way you are,
just the way you are
Oh, just the way you are, just the way you are
Oh, just the way you are."
[guitar strumming] We need some volunteers from the audience.
All right, come on up here, man.
Come on up here. Come on up here, come on now.
[guitar strumming] What's your name?
>>David: David.
>>Franti: Give it up for David.
>>David: I went to UC Davis.
[guitar strumming] >>Franti: You went to UC Davis?
Nice.
David from Davis.
I grew up in Davis.
All right, we got a lot of volunteers here.
Ok, we're gonna have a shake it contest.
David, you're first.
Don't go to the back, man, come back up here.
Come on, "shake it, shake it, shake it."
Put your hands together.
"Shake it, shake it, shake it. You the one for me now.
Shake it, shake it, shake it
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me now.
Shake it, shake it, shake it Shake it, shake it, shake it."
Give it up for that fine YouTube moment from David,
y'all!
Eric.
This is Eric with some interpretive dance.
[guitar] Woooo!
Give it up for Eric, ya'll.
Ok, we gotta make this a little more difficult.
What's your name?
This is Heather. Give it up for Heather.
This is Heather doing the California condor,
the rare, endangered species at a NASCAR event.
The California condor at a NASCAR event.
[laughter] NASCAR is auto racing.
Ok, ready? Here we go.
[guitar] [hoots and hollers from audience]
Give it up for Heather.
Ok, we got my son.
My son, Ade, doing the robot at Google.
[guitar]
Give it up for Ade! [applause]
All right, we got one more person over here.
What's your name? Give it up for Hillary.
>>Hillary: Be nice.
>>Franti: She said be nice.
Ok, anybody have a, something for Hillary
to interpretive dance?
What? >>member1: The Macarena.
>>Franti: The Macarena!
[resumes guitar strumming]
[sings] "One Maca, two Maca, three Macarena, four Maca,
five Maca, six Macarena Na-na-na-na-na-na-na-na
Hey Macarena"
[guitar]
Obviously, she's been taking lessons at the,
at the Google "How to be Cool at a Party Dance Class, right?
All right.
[sings] "So shake it on the beach girl,
vamos a la playa Hotter than the sun,
you know you set the soul on fiya
A bird in the sky, you make me feel like a flier -
higher, higher, higher, higher I got love for you baby,
like every single day Love for you,
in every single way I got love for you,
and everything that I cook It's not the way that you look,
it's the way that you shook
Everybody, shake it, shake it, shake it- come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it- come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it- come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me now
Shake it, shake it, shake it- come mama
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me
Shake it, shake it, shake it, woohoo
Shake it, shake it, shake it, you the one for me
Shake it, shake it, shake it Shake it, shake it, shake it"
Give it up for them, ya'll.
Eric, David, Sue, Hillary, Sara, Ade.
Thanks, ya'll.
[applause] Awesome, David.
[pause] Ok.
[pause] That was a nice little warm up.
I like that dude back there. He's got a lot of energy.
What department are you in?
>>member2: Security.
>>Franti: Aaah! No wonder.
Hahaha.
Ok, questions, right? Is that what we're doin' now?
Yeah, I think so. Yeah, I'd love some water.
[pause] Does anybody have a question?
>>memberfemale3: Will you please sing more?
>>Franti: What's that?
>>memberfemale3: Will you please sing more?
[laughter] >>Franti: Oh, yeah we'll sing more, yeah?
Are we supposed to do questions?
Is that this works? Oh, we mix it up.
Ok, we'll take a question. Anybody have a question?
Ok.
>>member4: What's it like opening for Mayer?
>>Franti: What is it like opening for Mayer?
[pause] Mayor McCheese or John Mayer?
[laughter] Oh. John Mayer.
It was really a unique experience
because right when we started the tour,
he had this big article come out in,
I guess, Playboy magazine, which I never read, of course.
[laughter] And, you know, he said all these flammatory,
inflammatory things, very, you know, weird stuff, you know?
Sexual and racial things and so I immediately went to him
and talked to him about it and at the time
he was super remorseful, you know what I mean?
He was just like, he said, "This is the worst day of my life.
I don't know how it could get any worse."
And so we talked for a long time.
We actually became really good friends around it,
you know?
And my music has always been the opposite,
you know?
To try to bring people, different groups together
and he, his music is that, too.
But, sometimes his mouth runs in a different way.
[laughter] And so, we just talked a lot about
getting your heart and your mouth to
say what you mean and mean what you say, you know?
And so we had a really great time and it was really cool
cause we recorded this new album,
"Sound of Sunshine," in the dressing room of
all these locker rooms of the NBA and hockey teams
that we were playing in.
And so, you know, we'd go out on stage and we'd play a song
to 15,000 people who had never heard our music before
and then we'd go in the locker room afterwards and we'd say,
"You know, we played that one too fast or too slow."
And then we were able to just like,
on our laptop, re-record the song.
We'd set the drums up in the shower and
I'd sing in the shower, which is the best place to sing,
of course, and, and we made this whole album on tour.
And so it was really great to have that kind of like,
interactive capability to be able to see
what the audience wants or is responding to,
and then be able to go in
and just make immediate changes.
And it used to be, they used to make an album for months
or spend a year doing it and then you get on the road
and you'd realize like, "God, this song was too slow."
And, and so it was a great experience for us to,
to be able to have that huge audience
to see how people respond, so yeah.
And in the end, me and John became great buddies
and we had a fun time.
Yeah, thank you, man. Thanks.
>>presenter: So, so we have the Q&A mic here.
I thought I'd, I'd cue things up.
Tell me more about your, your YouTube story.
You were one of the first artists
to really use that medium.
How did you get started
and what's it doin' for you right now?
>>Franti: Well, I got started through my son, Ade.
[audience member says Woo!] [mild clapping]
Who was like, yeah, who really got me excited about YouTube,
you know?
We'd stay up at night and we'd be like,
"Ok, David Blaine."
[laughter] I mean, like, YouTube David Blaine
for six hours, you know?
And then it would be like, the best soccer goals of 2004,
you know, and-- [laughter] and I'm still that way.
I don't have TV per se in my house,
but I have YouTube and I have Google and so,
we just, that's our way of entertaining ourselves.
But I thought, "Wouldn't it be cool to give people a little
glimpse of what we do every day on tour."
Because I remember just lookin' at album covers
when I was a kid and I'd see like, a photo of The Clash
on this album and I'd think like,
"Man, where did that dude get his belt?"
Or where, where did they, you know,
how does he string his guitar backwards like that
or something and, and so I thought,
"Wouldn't it be cool if like, next time I went belt shopping
I just brought my little camera with me
and we could show that."
So, we created this thing called, "Fran TV,"
and every day we just do like a two or three minute vlog
about our life on tour.
And sometimes it's as, you know,
mundane as belt shopping and other times
we're interviewing somebody who is doing some really
creative grass roots political organizing
or somebody who has got a fantastic new record
or, that no one has ever heard of and we interview them
or us just playing out on the street somewhere.
So, we love YouTube.
>>membermale5: You just mentioned some of the ways
that technology, including technology created by Google,
is helping connect you to the, the world of individuals.
What are some of the negative sides of big companies
like Google, and what can we do to mitigate those?
>>Franti: Hmmmm. Negative things.
You know, I-, I'll, I'll kinda say it in,
what, what people, what some artists view
as a negative is obviously downloading, you know?
And it's really changed the music business,
the way that we do it.
I was one of the artists who never really sold lots of
records, so when our music started get downloaded
and traded, it, like our career mushroomed.
It was the opposite and we always made music for people
to enjoy and we hoped that they would come to our shows
and then that they would buy a t-shirt,
or that they would support us by coming to 2, 3 or 4 shows.
And that's the way our fan base grew and so,
we've always been a band that said,
"Let's just ride with the wave of technology;
whatever is coming out.
Let's use it to help spread the word about what we do."
And we believe that if you treat the fans with dignity
and love and connection, and if they have a request that
you try your best to fulfill it,
that they always come back.
And, and so, I don't really see that there's anything wrong.
I can't think of anything particularly
with Google that's wrong.
But just, you know, there's, there's so many changes
that are, that are happening as we speak in terms of
what music is delivered to people and we're just a band
that feels like rather than try to fight it
with lawyers and Congress
and all this kind of stuff, that we just go with it
and see how we can change what we do and get our head wrapped
around it in a different way in a new way to help our fans
have the music because that's the most important thing.
[pause] >>membermale6: If Meg Whitman is elected
in November, who do you think should do the next
California Uber Alles?
>>Franti: Oh, wow, probably Woody Harrelson.
[laughter] Because, California Uber Alles is this Dead
Kennedy's song that was about the governor of California
back when, I think he wrote it when Reagan was the governor
and then I did a version when Pete Wilson was governor.
But, yeah, you know, I think Woody would be a great person
because he's got a great sense of humor
and he also smokes loads of weed and--
[laughter] she's kind of;
she's kind of contrary to either of those things.
[Franti laughs] So, he'd be a good person.
[laughter] >>Jolene: [inaudible]
>>Franti: Oh, sorry. There's a monitor there.
[reads from monitor] "What project, music
or otherwise, had the biggest personal impact?
Which one has had the most public impact?"
I presume they mean of my work.
What project, music or otherwise,
has had the biggest personal impact?
[woman clears throat] Well, my music always comes from
personal experience, but a few years ago I took a trip to
Iraq and I played music on the street and I was,
I kept watching the nightly news and I kept watching YouTube.
And the things that I was seeing on the nightly news
were completely the opposite of what I was seeing on YouTube
in terms of what was happening on the ground in Iraq.
And so I said to myself, "I'd really like to go to Iraq
and see what's happened."
So, I took my guitar and a video camera and 6 fr-,
and 6 friends and we flew to Amman, Jordan.
We hopped in a 16 passenger plane and we flew to Bagdad
and we get over the airport in Bagdad
and the pilot says, "In order to avoid a hit from a SAM-7
surface to air shoulder-launched missile, or small arms fire
from the ground, we will enter into a spiral descent."
[laughter] I was like, "I don't know what all that
first stuff meant, but I know what a spiral is."
[laughs] And sure enough, we go into this descent
just spiraling straight down to the ground
so he can get down there as fast as possible
and a heat-seeking missile can only make one arc, I found out.
So, if you keep spinning, it can't hit you.
So I get on the ground and I played music there
and I had all these songs prepared that were, like,
you know, peace songs and kind of protest songs
that I had written over the years and I was gonna sing them
for people on the ground.
And when I got there, I found that people,
Iraqis, were like, "That's a really nice sentiment,
but play us something that makes us dance.
Play us something that makes us laugh.
Play us something that makes us smile,
or cry, or feel something."
And, and so it really changed the way that I thought about
music cause the whole first part of my career in music,
I wrote lots of really heavy, political songs
and then I realized that if I wanted to reach people
all over the place, i-, it's like, you can either teach him,
give a man a fish, or teach a man to fish, you know?
And that's what I wanted to do.
I, I didn't just want to tell people about one specific
issue, or tell somebody that one certain person was good or bad,
I wanted to open people's hearts so that
whatever they viewed in the world, whatever issue it was,
that they had an open heart and an open mind
to the perspective on it.
And, so that, that was a really big change in the way
that I write music.
And so, instead of writing political songs,
I write songs about whatever I feel and then I go to those
places that I see there's conflict and I play them
on the streets, and make films about it and then I go back
and share what I've learned with people in America
and other places around the world.
[applause] [pause]
All right, let's play another song.
[clapping] [guitar strumming]
This is a song -- last summer, I was on tour
and my appendix ruptured in the middle of the tour
and I was in the hospital and every day I would,
you know, I'd go to the window and I'd look to see
if the sun was shining, you know?
And I'd pull the curtain and I'd be like,
"Is the sun shining?"
And if it was, I'd feel like, "Ahh, yes!
It's gonna be a great day today and I'm gonna heal up."
And if the sun wasn't shining, I'd then pull the covers over
my head and I'd try to imagine someplace that was sunny,
you know?
Or I'd pick up a guitar and I'd play
and I'd try to make sunshine come out of the guitar and
my friends would make me laugh and my stitches would bust open
and that would make me laugh more, you know?
And so, I made this whole record,
"The Sound of Sunshine," is all songs about
overcoming adversity and so, this is one of those songs.
[guitar strumming] [sings with guitar]
"It's been a long time coming that I had to say
When I wake up in the morning all I do is pray
For some guidance and protection on the streets today
And an answer to the questions I ask everyday
So tell me why do the birds that used to fly here
Tell me why do they come to die here
And all the kids that used to run here
Tell me why do they load their guns here I remember,
in the days when we were one heart no need to defend
I just wrap my arms around you
Don't give up This song is for you
Hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say
Won't let another moment slip away
I say hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say
Won't let another moment slip away
I hold on, I'm tryin' to hold on,
I hold on, hold on, hold on
From the tops of the buildings to the streets below
From the Wall Street banks to the empty homes
Between the lines of the people standing all in a row
There's a crack in the gutter where a flower grows
Remindin' me that everything is possible
Yeah remindin' me that nothing is impossible
You gotta live for the one that you love you know
You gotta love for the life that you live you know
Singin' hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say
Won't let another moment slip away
I say hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say
Won't let another moment slip away
I hold on, I'm tryin' to hold on,
I hold on, I'm tryin' to hold on Until the morning comes again,
I will remain with you my friend
We will dance until the sun goes to
the place where it begun
We will live to laugh and cry another day
Don't let nobody ever tell you that it couldn't be done
Don't let nobody ever tell you that we couldn't be one
Don't let nobody ever tell you that it shouldn't be sung
Don't let nobody ever tell you you're the only one
[applause, cheers]
Singin' hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say
Won't let another moment slip away
I say hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say"
Put your hands up high, ya'll
"Woah oh oh oh Woah oh oh oh Woah oh oh oh Woah oh oh oh,
I'm just tryin' to hold on
Tryin' to hold on Tryin' to hold on
I say hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say
Won't let another moment slip away
I say hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say
Won't let another moment slip away
hold on, I'm tryin' to hold on,
[audience clapping in rhythm] hold on, hold on, hold on
Don't let nobody ever tell you that it couldn't be done
Don't let nobody ever tell you that we couldn't be one
Don't let nobody ever tell you that it shouldn't be sung
Don't let nobody ever tell you you're the only one
Singin' hey, hey, hey, no matter how life is today
There's just one thing that I got to say
Won't let another moment slip away I hold on"
[guitar] Thanks, ya'll.
[applause] >>presenter: All right.
So, Michael, it looks like we have one more question here
and for those of you in the audience,
if anybody has any last questions,
feel free to queue up behind one of the microphones.
So, this last question here comes from Suze
in Mountain View.
[reads question] "Michael, your website promotes
health, fitness, and organizations.
Can you tell us about how this and events like Power
to the Peaceful happen?
Do you take the ideas and turn them into,
how do you take the ideas and turn them
into meaningful action?"
>>Franti: The first part of the question,
yeah, on our website we want it to be a place
where people come and don't just check out our music,
or look at when our tour dates are.
We want it to be a place where there's a community
that can hang out and that can connect.
Cause that's really what our fans do.
They travel to a lot of different shows
and our fans rage, rage in age, haha.
They do rage in age.
[laughter] From like, little kids, you know, to their moms.
And then 20 and 20-, you know, college age kids
and then on up to like, 40 and 50 and 60 year olds,
so there's, there's like a really wide range of people.
So, we want our site to be broad;
issues that would be broad.
So we do have like a health part of our site, a fitness.
We promote a lot of different social justice organizations
and environmental organizations and
every year we do this big festival in San Francisco
called The Power to the Peaceful and it started off --
[audience claps] Yeah. It started off being a day
that we did on September 11th, 1999.
And it was a day of ardent action that 150 different
artists around the world did different events for this man
named Mumia Abu-Jamal who's on Death Row in Pennsylvania.
We felt like his case deserved to be reheard
and so we selected the day 9/11
because we wanted to say this is an emergency.
So, we put this on in 1999, and then again in 2000,
and then 2001, of course,
the attacks occurred on September 11th.
So, we wanted this day,
or the festival kind of took a shift on that day
and we said, "We want this day to be remembered
not as a day to beat the drums of war.
We want our sadness and our mourning to
be something more meaningful.
We want it to be a day when we say,
'How can each of us do something to make the world a
better place, a more prosperous place for more people?'"
And, and so that's what the festival became,
became a day where we invite hundreds of
different social justice and environmental organizations
out to the park in San Francisco,
bring a lot of great music, a lot of great food,
have activities for kids and families,
and we do this giant free concert for 50,000 people.
And the last part of the question says,
"How do you take ideas and turn them into meaning action?"
And people ask me a lot, they say, "What can I do?"
And the best response that I have come up with is,
"Do what you can."
And what I mean by that is I met a woman
in Denver a few years back.
She said, "You know, Michael, I saw your film about going to
Iraq and I thought what can I do to change the world?
I'm a hairdresser."
And so what she did is she met several women who were coming
because they were having chemotherapy
and they were losing their hair.
And so she decided to create this one night every week
where she would do beauty treatments, hair cutting,
whatever, for women who are undergoing chemotherapy.
And I thought that was just so incredible.
It's like, "What can I do? Do what you can."
And so, that's what we try to do is,
through our music and through the events that we do,
is encourage people to, to find ways that,
whatever it is that your skill is to,
to give back, right?
>>presenter: So, we have time for one more question.
>>membermale7: Should I keep it short,
then? It's up to you?
>>Franti: Go ahead, as long as you want.
>>membermale7: I, I was, I wanted to ask you
a little bit about, you mentioned before,
but how the economic models for music has changed and,
and it seems like you're getting paid more for performances
rather than the actual production of the music now,
which means you kinda have to keep touring,
keep performing all the time.
It seems like once you reach a large body of work
that people are listening to all the time, that that
seems like something ideally people would get paid for.
I don't know if you have any feelings about that and,
and what the ideal situation would be,
or if just that people are accepting reality
and that's not gonna happen any time soon.
>>Franti: I just think it's a matter of time before
there's a model that worked out
so that every time a piece of music is traded,
that it's somehow that audio has actual audio,
is identified and that every time it's traded,
that there could be some way that there was a royalty.
I don't know if it's through subscribership
or if it's through, you know, some other means,
but I think that in the future we're just gonna look
at this time as a little bump in the road
in terms of the sale of music.
But, I'm not counting on that.
I'm, I'm just gonna continue to go out and play music for
whoever wants to do it.
In part, because it's how I earn my living,
but mainly because it's what I love to do,
you know?
And so, I think that, I mean,
we, we do a lot of other stuff, so we find ways to;
find hard things that we could sell,
like children's books.
I just opened a yoga retreat center in Bali that combines,
you know, my music and yoga, which is another one of
my passions and we have an organic clothing company that
does clothes that are beyond just our regular tour t-shirts.
>>membermale7: Sure.
>>Franti: And so, we're always trying to find ways
that we can be enterprising to keep it all afloat
and most of the time we're going hand to mouth,
but that's better than going hand to no mouth.
[Franti laughs] [audience laughs]
So, I feel really hopeful.
I feel more optimistic about music today than ever before
and the reason for that is that
I remember that when I was a kid,
everybody had like the 10 or 15 records in their collection
that they loved and then when it turned to CDs,
everybody had like, 40 or 50 CDs
on one of those really cool, black racks, you know?
[female laughter] Like, from Sharper Image or something,
you know?
[audience laughs] And now, you have whatever handheld device,
be it your phone or your i-, iPod, or whatever it is
and you have thousands and thousands of songs available.
And next, those songs are gonna be somewhere,
like in outer space on a cloud, you know?
[laughter] And all you gotta do is just request it,
and it's there for you, you know?
And you can have millions of songs at your disposal,
and so I feel like the more access to music,
the better it is for artists.
And the artists of the 21st century have to
become an artist who doesn't just know how to play guitar,
but you know how to use Facebook and social networking
and you understand how you can make money
beyond just selling a piece of plastic.
And as far as I'm concerned,
the sooner those plastic things go away, the better, so.
>>membermale7: On the hand to mouth question,
you still eating red beans and rice?
>>Franti: I do--
[audience laughs] I still eat red beans and rice.
It's my favorite thing.
[applause] >>presenter: All right.
Michael, Thank you for a very awesome show.
Let's close with one song.
>>Franti: Alright, cool.
Let's tune this guitar.
This is a song -- I mentioned Woody Harrelson earlier --
this is a song I wrote in Woody's bathroom.
[laughter] And Woody invited me to his house 'cause he was off
makin' a movie somewhere and we've been buddies for awhile
and he said, "You know, you're recording in LA,
you should just hang out at my house 'cause it's empty and,
and so I was in the shower at Woody's house
and I put some guitar chords down on my iPod
and I was playing them back in the shower
and I started getting this great idea.
And you know when you have a great idea,
you have to write it down somewhere,
you know?
You have to like, put it on something and I, I, I,
I was inspired just going in the bathroom here today
because there's all these great ideas up in the bathroom--
[laughter] and I think that it's a really great thing to,
actually, is like, if you have an idea,
that there should be a space that you could write it down
wherever you were so that when other people came by,
that they could maybe add something to that,
or, or it could inspire them in some way.
So, Woody has this great space in his,
in his shower and I got this idea.
It was flowing, you know, and I was like vibing off Woody's
energy there, man, and,-- [laughter] and I get this idea
and I go, "I gotta write this down,
so I look all over and I can't find a pen
and I looked everywhere.
And so, I get this idea like,
Oh, I know, I'll just put it on the,
on the glass in the, on the, on the shower and so like,
Hey, I got that one licked.
I write it all, I write this whole song down
and then I get out of the shower and I turn around
and the glass is just evaporating.
And so I panic and I pick up my iPod and I take a picture.
I'm like, "Click. Technology delivers."
[laughter] I'm feeling really, you know,
techy at the time, and then I put it into Photoshop
and of course, it's inside out and backwards
and I have to call my friend back home to
walk me through flipping the picture,
which for me was like trying to land a 747--
[laughter] on like a piece of ice in the middle of the ocean.
And so, I get it turned inside out and backwards right way,
and I, I read the lyrics and I'm like feeling,
"oh, this is great, like a hit song, you know?
I think I wrote," and so I'm sitting on Woody's toilet
and he calls and he's like,
"Michael, how's, how's, how's the song writing going?"
And I'm like, "Woody, its going great, man.
I think I wrote a hit song in your bathroom."
[laughter] And he says, "Is it a number 1 or a number 2?"
[laughter and clapping] So, this is a song.
In, in 23 years we had never had a song
in the top 20,000 before until this song.
And this song actually made it into the Top 20 last year
and if you know it, sing along. It goes like this:
[sings] "I say hey I'll be gone today
But I'll be back coming around the way
It seems like everywhere I go
The more I see The less I know
But I know one thing
That I love you, I love you, I love you, I love you
One, two, put your hands together, ya'll
[guitar] I say hey, I'll be gone today
But I'll be back coming around the way
It seems like everywhere I go
The more I see The less I know
But I know one thing That I love you,
baby girl I love you I love you Make some noise
I've been a lot of places all around the way
I've seen a lot joy and I've seen a lot of pain
But I don't want to write a love song for the world,
I just want to write a song about a boy and a girl
Junkies on the corner always callin' my name
And the kids on the corner playin' ghetto games
When I saw you getting down well I hoped it was you
And when I looked into your eyes I knew it was true
I say Hey I'll be gone today
But I'll be back comin' around the way
It seems like everywhere I go
The more I see The less I know
But I know one thing That I love you,
baby girl I love you I love you I love you"
We need some more kids up here.
We need some more kids up here.
Come on up.
You, too, in the tie-dye shirt.
Come on up.
[guitar] There we go.
"Now I'm not a highly metaphysical man
But I know when the stars are aligned you can
Bump into a person in the middle of the road
Look into their eyes and you suddenly know
Rockin' in the dance hall movin' with you
Dancin' in the night in the middle of June
My momma told me don't lose you
'Cause the best luck I had was you
I said Hey I'll be gone today
But I'll be back comin' around the way
Seems like everywhere I go
The more I see the less I know
>>Franti: But I know >>Jolene: I know
>>Franti: one thing That I love you,
baby girl, I love you, I love you"
Everybody on your feet now. Everybody on your feet.
"Rockin' in the dance hall movin' with you
I said Hey momma hey momma close to you
Rockin' in the dance hall movin' with you
Hey papa, hey papa pick up your shoes
Rockin' in the dance hall movin' with you
Hey Momma, hey momma close to you
Rocking in the dance hall moving with you
I said Hey momma, hey momma, hey momma, hey momma
Hey momma, hey momma, hey momma, hey momma
Hey momma, hey momma, hey momma, hey momma
Hey momma, hey momma, hey momma, hey momma"
[applause]
>>Franti: C'mon up here. I wanna sing with me.
[pause] [guitar]
Ok, that's ok.
>>Ade: "My momma told me don't lose you
Cause the best luck I had was you
I love you, I love you, I love you"
[guitar] One, two, put your hands up high!
Singin' hey, I'll be gone today
But I'll be back coming around the way
Seems like everywhere I go
The more I see the less I know
I said hey I'll be gone today
But I'll be back coming around the way
It seems like everywhere I go
The more I see the less I know
But I know one thing that I love you,
baby girl I love you I love you"
Jake, boogie rock that guitar hard man!
[guitar solo]
Give it up for Jake Boogie on the guitar.
"Hey, I'll be gone today
But I'll be back comin' around the way
It seems like everywhere I go
The more I see the less I know
>>Franti: But I know one thing
>>Audience: that I love you
Google, that I love you!"
[guitar] [applause]
I wanna see you all jumpin' One, two, three, come on, ya'll
[fast guitar playing]
>>Audience: I love you >>Franti: I love you,
I love you, I love you, I love you,
it's true, it's true, I love you, I love you"
Google thanks so much for having us here.
This is Jolene on the vocals, Jake Boogie on the guitar.
My son, Ade.
I'm Michael Franti, thanks so much,
I learned a lot here today.
Thanks a lot for havin' us here
and thanks for all your support.
We love you!
[heavy guitar strumming] [applause]
Feel it, feel it!
Thanks, ya'll.
[applause]
['Shake it' song plays in background]