Super Bowl Cooking with Martie Duncan


Uploaded by USGOVHHS on 31.01.2013

Transcript:
The Super Bowl isn’t all about football and bragging rights.
It’s all about the food.
Did you know Americans consume more food on Super Bowl Sunday than any other day besides
Thanksgiving?
We do.
Hey, I’m Martie Duncan from MartieKnowsParties.com and Season 8 of Food Network Star.
I’m known for affordable ideas for easy entertaining and I’m making a couple of
my game day favorites here:
my firey diablo chicken wings,
an additictive three onion dig,
along with my fresh guacamole and salsa.
But did you know that all of these can cause big problems if you don’t prepare and serve
them properly?
Having been on the receiving end of food poisoning a couple of times,
I know how important food safety is when entertaining.
So I've partnered with the USDA, the FDA, the CDC and the Ad Council to remind you to
make food safety a big priority on game day!
We have tips on FoodSafety.gov to help you throw a winning Super Bowl Party… because
everybody loses when food becomes unsafe.
For parties, I always follow the 40-140 rule for food safety.
I keep cold foods chilled at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below,
and hot foods heated to 140 degrees Fahrenheit or above.
Also remember to Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill.
Unclean hands are one of the biggest culprits for spreading germs,
so every time you high five you’ve gotta wash them again before before preparing and
serving food.
And remember to use clean cutting boards and to clean your utensils and your countertops
too.
Homemade salsa and guacamole contain a lot of fresh ingredients,
like I’ve got here.
Some of them could be contaminated, so make sure you wash all of your ingredients and
your hands.
Even those things you peel, like avocados,
have to be washed before you use them.
Now - Cross-contamination occurs when raw meats touch ready-to-eat foods
like veggies.
And, for serving, have plenty of individual plates and a serving spoon for each dish.
This encourages guests to add a spoonful of guacamole or salsa onto their plate,
rather than standing at the buffet and grazing out of a shared bowl.
Take a “time out” and use a food thermometer to make sure your meat and poultry are safely
cooked.
Meat color just isn’t a reliable indicator that the meat is fully cooked —
only internal temperature is. We have food temperature guides for you on FoodSafety.gov.
And the two hour rule is also in effect.
Food just should not sit out at room temperature for more than 2 hours,
so remember that and at halftime, be ready with replacements.
Promptly chill raw and prepared foods to 40 degrees farenheit or below
if not consuming them after you cook them.
And for serving, display cold foods over bowls of ice or on ice for a stylish and safe party.
You can find all my favorite game day recipes and party ideas at MartieKnowsParties.com,
and if you have questions about preventing food poisoning and how to keep your friends
and family safe this Super Bowl Sunday,
check out the free resources on FoodSafety.gov.
The AskKaren database has answers to 1,500 questions related to foodborne illness.
And the USDA Meat & Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline,
is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday.
For the USDA, the FDA, the CDC and the Ad Council,
have an awesome Super Bowl get together and stay food safe.
Gooooo. Wait? Who’s playing in the Super Bowl this year?