Glaucoma


Uploaded by NIHOD on 04.01.2011

Transcript:

A doctor explains glaucoma, and how to treat the condition.
Glaucoma is one of the most common diseases of the eye.
And it is one of the ones that patients often have the least
chance of recognizing themselves, because the damage typically
starts in what we call the peripheral vision, the outside areas of vision.
And only in advanced disease will the center of vision be affected.
People at greatest risk are African Americans and Hispanics, but
actually, it is common enough that everybody should
be examined for glaucoma.
What people are used to hearing is that if their pressure is high,
they might have glaucoma.
Actually, a person can have glaucoma if their pressure is
normal, or they could have a healthy eye with their pressure
a little bit high.
So without dilating the eye and looking at the nerve itself,
they cannot be told whether or not they have glaucoma.
Glaucoma is treated by a variety of approaches.
Most commonly, the first treatment is eye drops.
A person is told to take these drops either once a day or twice a day.
It is extremely important that patients take their eye drops
regularly, because taking the drops the day before you see the eye
doctor and having normal pressure for that exam hasn't protected the
eye via all the other days when the person was at home and wasn't
going for an eye exam.
Other treatments for glaucoma include the use of lasers, and in
cases, extreme cases, where the disease cannot be controlled with
eye drops and lasers, we have surgical techniques.
For more information about eye health, about finding an eye care
professional, or about locating an organization that can provide
financial assistance for eye care, please refer to our website.
That is www.nei.nih.gov.