SpikerBox Commercial Three


Uploaded by backyardbrains on 16.02.2011

Transcript:
Hello, we're Backyard Brains! Do you want to accelerate neuroscience innovation?
Do you want to study neurons on a train? Do you want to study neurons on a plane?
Do you want to show neuroscience to your grandma? Do you want to hang out with lovely outdoor sportswear models?
Do you think bugs are really really cool?
Do you not have the means to get into an institution like this, but instead only
have your basement workshop? Do you want to improve the state of neuroscience education? Well, Tim and Greg
can help you! We present the open-sourced SpikerBox! Where you can inexpensively
record from the nervous system of insects. But how do you use it? Let's show you!
To begin, take some ice from your mother-in-law's refrigerator
Then, go downstairs to your basement workshop and grab your cockroaches from
their favorite hiding place.
Make sure they're alive and healthy.
Take one of the good ones and dunk it in the ice water anesthesia; after a few
moments it'll stop moving and will be ready for the surgery.
Carefully cut off one of its legs.
Don't worry,
they can grow back.
Now, take the electrodes of your SpikerBox and place one electrode in the coxa as the ground
and one the femur to serve as your recording electrode
And simply turn the SpikerBox on.
Whoa! That popping sound you're hearing is the spontaneous discharge rate
of the living neurons in the still-living leg. Let's take a closer look.
Notice the rate of popping, or spiking, increases when I touch the barbs on the leg.
What does this mean?
We've also developed an iPhone application to interface with the SpikerBox and allow
you to view and record your spiking activity to share it with your friends and
colleagues.
Look at all those wonderful action potentials!
We've also developed a lab manual to teach you basic principles of
neuroscience through some fun experiments.
A particularly fun one students enjoy is stimulating neurons and muscles to music.
Another experiment I can do is the effect of temperature on neurons.
When I bring my cockroach leg into the cold garage, as the temperature drops
to below twenty degrees, you can see the neural activity go away.
Why is this?
We also sell a bag-of-parts, where you can learn about analog electronics and build
a SpikerBox yourself. Don't think you can do it? Well, these eighth graders
did it, as well as this group of high school freshmen.
The SpikerBox works on the cricket cercal system and in case you're wondering,
also the medicinal leech.
More adventurous users have also found it works in human EMG's
You can order a SpikerBox of your own at BackyardBrains.com
Tell us any experiment you come up with! We'd love to hear from you.
Backyard Brains, Neuroscience for everyone!
But wait! There's one more thing. To all you DJ's an artists out there, you can listen to
Kraftwerk, but transformed by the cockroach nervous system!