Webmaster Central and Best Practices - Adam Lasnik - Google India SearchMasters '09


Uploaded by GoogleWebmasterHelp on 06.05.2009

Transcript:
>> LASNIK: So, I'm going to be chatting with you for about the next hour and a half or
so. But don't worry it's not going to be all me, there will definitely be some time for
questions and certainly time also throughout the day for questions as well. Not to mention
even during lunch, all of us from Google will certainly be joining you and I look forward
to not only answering your questions but getting your feedback as well. So, let's take a look
here at the big picture, why does Google care about webmasters in the first place? And the
very blunt truth is without webmasters, without your content we don't have a search engine.
And we depend upon not only great content in the aggregate but great local content,
content that is local to India, the country, each individual state, and perhaps the most
importantly local, within each community. We want to make you, the webmasters happy
because when you are happier and have a better understanding of how Google works, how you
can get more of your great content in Google, then you are more apt to stick with it to
make more of that content. And then, from there, users themselves are also happier.
Happier users stay on web pages and use the internet more as we can guess which means
most likely more traffic and more revenue for you as well. It ends up being a bit of
a virtuous circle or cycle. How do we connect with webmasters? There are three core components
here. The first is tools. We provide to you through Webmaster Tools and Webmaster Central
a set of resources that enable you to better understand how Google sees your sites. To
diagnose problems and to actually make your site more targeted for your users. We provide
for you information through our blog and through our forum, to help dispel myths and to help
give you best practices. And unless you worry by the way that I'm just going to be giving
you an overview today, I promise you that I will be giving you some very specific tips
that you can take home and use when we get into the best practice section of my presentation
today. And then one of the other core parts of how we connect with you is through discussions.
So, in fact, I'd already mentioned about our webmaster help forum and our India search
quality guides that are actively participating now. When I started about three years ago,
we had just one forum and about two, two of us that were spending some time on it and
a third person that would spent about an hour a week. And now we have more than a dozen
forums in different languages around the world, and these are to the ones just for webmasters.
And dozens of Google guides along with many, many other search experts that are helping
to answer questions to take feedback and bring it back to the search quality Googlers. Among
the best practices, the areas of best practices that I'll be talking to you about today include
the following. Discovery, getting more of your pages actually found by Googlebot and
then placed into the Index. Accessibility, which is I feel one of the weakest points
worldwide on the Web and one of the most important facets for you being successful with Google
and with users. And promotion, now that you have that content that's been discovered by
Googlebot, you've made your site accessible. Okay, what now? How do you actually get traffic?
Qualified traffic and users? There is also sort of a fun bonus that I want to mention
ahead of time now for you. And that is going to be what we are calling the site clinic
in just a couple of hours. And that's where we will ask, any of you that are interested
in having your site evaluated, both the good and the bad commented upon by those of us
from Google in front of everybody. And we are going to ask you to be brave and in exchange
with that we will give you good actionable feedback. And in order to volunteer for that,
we will invite you towards the end of my presentation, I believe, to take your business card or to
write your URL on a piece of paper and place that within the bins that we'll have here
at the front. We will then select one or more of those and we will then discuss your site,
the strong points and some constructive criticisms afterwards. Throughout my presentation, you'll
see a number of photos. That's because it is my desperate attempt to actually make my
PowerPoint look somewhat interesting and decent. I've spent my whole time at Google in Search
Quality and I still haven't learned how to make a good PowerPoint. All the pictures you
see will either be ones that I've taken or will include a credit and I've taken them
from one or more search engines on the Web with a creative comments license that's been
attributed to them. This one is from Sparky from Seattle. This one, and by the way is
a very recent one when I was in Charminar, my first time in India. And of course I wanted
to do the touristy things, so, there is me looking a bit like a tourist. Actually, a
few other quick notes about me. Paul had already had mentioned the number of things about my
background particularly before Google. I am certainly an overeducated geek. I was doing
email before there was much of a public internet in fact. An American very close network called
Protégé Online Systems. And even then I was a very vocal brat and I was telling
them how to make forums and I helped them establish their very first teen forum, perhaps
one of the first online actually. Since then I have hoped to establish in my own forums
both in Google and outside beforehand. And I'm also certainly a passionate Googler, so,
I've been with Google as I'd mentioned for three years. I'm very excited about many of
the products that Google offers me. So, if you do have questions in other products, I
can't answer officially but maybe I have some thoughts on things ranging from Google Reader
to Calendar and so on. Happy traveler and artist, it's my very first time in India.
I have been fortunate enough to visit a lot of the world. None of which prepared me for
India. It has been an amazing experience so far, everything from the actual real spicy
food to the traffic, the colors and everything in between. I wish my stay was longer, but
after Chennai tomorrow I'd then end up going to Tokyo, in Japan. My role at Google has
already been defined a bit as a search evangelist; my core role has been helping to strengthen
the communications between Google and webmasters in both directions. It's also have been to
help elevate the resources we have. All the pillars of webmasters central to help you,
help yourself as webmasters and SCOs. The ultimate goal for us at Google and hopefully
for those of you here as well is to improve the quality of search. It's not only about
your individual sites; it's about making the Web better, making the Web better also for
India. Just a brief few notes on how Google supports you, and the core categories, Tools,
not only Webmaster Tools but also Website Optimizer which we will be talking about later
today. With information, again, not only from Webmaster Tools but also Analytics. You'll
see a lot of overlap with these different resources that we offer you. I recommend that
you use as many of them as you can because each will give you slightly overlapping but
distinctly useful information on the whole. And, of course, also our help center and Google
blog, and the discussions that I've already talked about in our Help form. We've also
done a number of live events. One of them, for instance, was called June Tune held this
last June. These have had up to 700 people calling in on the phone or listening to our
audio broadcast where we have scrambled to answer literally hundreds of questions in
writing and in speaking in the course of just over an hour. The Googlers that are helping
you and helping the Web, these are all in the aggregate members of the Search Quality
team and they include many, many people here in India both in Bangalore and Hyderabad and
beyond. The core responsibilities on the people on this team that interact with webmasters
are to analyze how the Web is and what is there and what the challenges are. I believe
that I've already given you a bit of an India centric picture of the Web and Mobile and
Broadband. To build the tools, they can help make you better webmasters and bring your
sites to the next level. To connect with you to not only find out what tools you want but
also to hear your feedback about your site and so no, and lastly, to document this within
our Help Center. This involves writers and UI people, product managers and others. The
people who work with webmasters specifically on this team actually had to specifically
apply or audition to be in that group of search quality. It's one of the most popular areas
of Google Search quality. Our guiding principles, we want and insist upon having fairness which
includes sites of all sizes, advertisers and those, those who advertise with Google, those
who do not advertise with Google. I guess this is a good time for me to make a brief
comment about that specifically. We really love our advertisers. And the important part
here is we also really love those who do not advertise with Google, who do not use AdWords
and AdSense. These are completely separate systems. Regardless of what rumors you may
hear, there is no interplay between the servers of search and the servers of AdSense and AdWords.
They are different teams, different buildings, different people, different systems. Effectiveness
is one of the other core principles. We want to make sure that the work we do with you
is helping to not only--it help you but help search, help the Web and last is scalability.
Again all types of sites, all users, all languages. And my goodness, have I learned how many languages
you have here in India and the challenges that we face in supporting more and more of
them. And, of course, in all countries. Here is a picture of the many people who are better
looking than I am. This is many but not all of the folks in Google Search Quality in India.
Here is just a quick screenshot. I hope and expect most of you would have the chance to
explore the Master Central. That's what it looks like. I'll give you the URL again later.
And that's about all the say on that slide. A few specific notes about two core parts
of Webmaster Central. Our Tools and our Blog. Here are a few of the things that you can
do with Webmaster Tools. Some of which you might not yet have tried. You can diagnose
issues including crawl errors when Googlebot actually couldn't get to some of your pages.
Robots.txt concerns. This means when we found this are very--more often than you'd expect.
Many times Webmasters will ask us, why did you suddenly drop half of our site or even
all of our sites? Did we do something wrong? And what we find more often than you'd expect
is that someone has uploaded an old robots.txt file to their server when they were redoing
some stuff where they had the under construction version and it blocked a huge part of their
site from Googlebot and other search engines. Actually we have a diagnosis tool. They can
pop up in a little red box saying, "Hey, do you mean to be blocking us?" You can change
settings. You can tell us what your canonical domain is. You can also now--this is pretty
recent, adjust the slider to tell us, "Please crawl us more quickly or crawl my server slower,
please." You can get insights including Backlinks. One of you had sent a question asking, "Why
is it that when I do a site calling mysite.com, I don't get the same type of results, the
same list as I do when I look in Webmaster Tools? Which one is right?" And the answer
is they're both right but the site:--excuse me; it's just giving you a sampling. Our goal
is to process requests on the main search engine as quickly as we can to save resources,
but when you on a practically comprehensive in full list of your Backlinks, those pages
that are linking to you. Use Webmaster Tools. You can even download this as a CSV file and
play with it there. And then lastly on tools. You can make improvements. For instance, a
relatively new--a tool we have will allow you to improve your 404 air pages with relevant
links for your users. That means happier users. That means users that instead of clicking
off somewhere else and going to a competitor, I'm more likely to stay on your site. And
you can also share your SiteMaps with us to let us know which ones you have, Geo, HTML,
video and so on. From the Webmaster--looking a bit like a tourist. I actually have a few
other quick notes about me. Paul had already mentioned a number of things about my background
particularly before Google. I am certainly an overeducated geek. I was doing email before
there was much of a public internet, in fact, on American, very close in that work called
Protégé Online Systems. And even then I was a very vocal brat and I was telling
them how to make forms and I helped them established their very first teen forum. Perhaps one of
the first online actually, since then I have hoped to establish in my own forms both in
Google and outside beforehand. And I'm also certainly a passionate Googler. So I've been
with Google as I've mentioned for three years. I'm very excited about many of the products
that Google offers me. So if you do have questions in other products, I can't answer officially
but maybe I have some thoughts on things ranging from Google Reader to Calendar and so on.
Happy traveler and artist. It's my very first time in India. I have been fortunate enough
to visit a lot of the world. None of which prepared me for India. It has been an amazing
experience so far, everything from the actual real spicy food to the traffic, the colors
and everything in between. I wish my stay was longer but after Chennai tomorrow, I then
end up going to Tokyo in Japan. My role at Google has already been defined a bit. As
a search evangelist, my core role has been helping to strengthen the communications between
Google and Webmasters in both directions. It's also been to help elevate the resources
we have, all the pillars of Webmaster Central, to help you help yourself as webmasters and
as CEOs. The ultimate goal for us at Google, and hopefully for those of you here as well,
is to improve the quality of search. It's not only about your individual sites. It's
about making the web better, making the web better also for India. Just a brief few notes
on how Google supports you in the core categories, tools, not only Webmaster Tools, but also
Website Optimizer, which we'll be talking about later today. With information, again,
not only from Webmaster Tools but also Analytics. You'll see a lot of overlap with these different
resources that we offer you. I recommend that you use as many of them as you can, because
each will give you slightly overlapping but distinctly useful information on the whole.
And of course, also our help center and Google blog, and the discussions I've already talked
about in our help forum. We've also done a number of live events. One of them, for instance,
was called June Tune, held this last June. These would had up to 700 people calling in
on the phone or listening to our audio broadcast where we have scrambled to answer literally
hundreds of questions in writing and in speaking. And, of course, with just over an hour. The
Googlers that are helping you and helping the Web, these are all in the aggregate members
of the Search Quality team. And they include many, many people here in India, both in Bangalore
and Hyderabad, and beyond. The core responsibilities of the people on this team that interact with
webmasters are to analyze how the web is, and what is their and what the challenges
are. I believe that I have already given you a bit of an India-centric picture of the Web
and Mobile and Broadband. To build the tools, they can help make you better webmasters and
bring your sites to the next level. To connect with you, to not only find out what tools
you want but also to hear your feedback about your sites and so on. And lastly, to document
this within our help center. This involves writers and UI people, product managers, and
others. The people who work with webmasters specifically on this team actually had to
specifically apply or audition to be in that group of Search Quality. It's one of the most
popular areas of Google Search Quality. Our guiding principles. We want and insist upon
having fairness, which includes sites of all sizes, advertisers, and those who advertise
with Google, those who do not advertise with Google. I think this is a good time for me
to make a brief comment about that specifically. We really love our advertisers. And the important
part here is we also really love those who do not advertise with Google, who do not use
AdWords and AdSense. These are completely separate systems. Regardless of what rumors
you may hear, there is no interplay between the servers of search, and the servers of
AdSense and AdWords. They are different teams, different buildings, different people, and
different systems. Effectiveness is one of the other core principles. We want to make
sure that the work we do with you is helping to not only it help you but help the search,
help the Web. And the last is scalability. Again, all types of sites, all users, all
languages. And my goodness, have I learned how many languages you have here in India,
and that the challenges that we face in supporting more and more of them, and of course in all
countries. Here's a picture of the many people who are better looking than I am. This is
many but not all of the folks in Google search quality in India. Here's just a quick screenshot
I hope and expect most of you have had the chance to explore at Master Central. That's
what it looks like. I'll give you the URL again later. And that's about all the say
on that slide. A few specific notes about two core parts of Webmaster Central, our two--our
tools and our blog. Here are a few of the things that you can do with Webmaster Tools,
some of which you might not yet have tried. You can diagnose issues including crawl errors
when Google blog actually couldn't get to some of your pages. Robots.text concerns.
This means we've found this all very, more often than you'd expect. Many times webmasters
will ask us, "Why did you suddenly drop half of our site, or even all of our sites? Did
we do something wrong?" And what we find, more often than you'd expect, is that someone
has uploaded an old robot.txt file to their server when they were redoing some stuff,
where they had the under-construction version. And it blocked a huge part of their site from
Googlebot or in other search engines. So we actually have a diagnosis tool. They can pop-up
in a little red box saying, "Hey, do you mean to be blocking us?" You can change the settings.
You can tell us what your canonical domain is. You can also now, it's just pretty recent,
adjust the slider to tell us: "Please crawl us more quickly or crawl my server slower,
please." You can get insights including Backlinks. One of you had sent a question asking: "Why
is it that when I do a site call on mysite.com, I don't get the same type of results, the
same list, as I do when I look in Webmaster Tools? Which one is right?" And the answer
is they're both right. But the site calling--excuse me--is just giving you a sampling. Our goal
is to process request on the main search engine as quickly as we can to save resources. But
when you are on a practically comprehensive and fullest of your Backlinks, those pages
that are linking to you use Webmaster Tools. You can even download this as a CSV file and
play with it there. And then lastly on tools, you can make improvements. For instance, a
relatively new tool we have will allow you to improve your 404 error pages with relevant
links for your users. That means half of your users. That means users that instead of clicking
off somewhere else and going to a competitor are more likely to stay on your sites. And
you can also share your SiteMaps with us to let us know which ones you have, GEO, HTML,
video, and so on. From our Webmaster Central blog, you can get the best--the best practice
tips and info, learn about ways to add useful, more useful content to your sites, and also
read about the latest enhancements in tools and so on. So, how do you help Google find
your pages? Let me first tell you what is probably not a good way. We have a service
that's called the add-your-URL page. I'm guessing that in the vast majority of cases, Google
already has one or more of your pages index, but you just want more of the index so you
want them ranked higher. This tool then is not for you. That is only one Google does
not know about your site at all, a new domain. The ones that you probably, the methods you
probably want to be looking at are SiteMaps. These are two--you have two different kinds
here: HTML and XML. The HTML is the user-facing, user-friendly one that is essentially a page
or a small set of pages on your site that list every core page on your site. And let
me tell you for busy and impatient users, this is a great option. They just want it
quickly. They know what page they want. They want to be able to just do a Control F on
the page and find it. They don't want to use the search on your site or navigate. Don't
disappoint your users. Have that available for them. And that also can help Google because
it's--you have a set of links compacted on one or a few pages. It can help Googlebot
find more easily some of your pages especially when it is paired with an XML site then. You
can learn more about our XML sitemaps at sitemaps.org. And I am very pleased to say this is not just
a Google initiative. This is an initiative sponsored by many of the major search engines
which includes Yahoo and Microsoft. We all look at the same SiteMap file. This file tells--tells
Google and the other search engines, "Hey, these are all the pages that I want you to
know about on my site. Here's how often they're changing. Here is the priority of these pages
as well." And here you see, as a very short example of what sitemap page may look like.
Unfortunately, thanks to my great PowerPoint skills, I've hidden some of the commentary
on quality links. And I believe what I was getting at in that point was these SiteMaps
will not substitute for you having great content and links from authoritative and trusted relevant
sites. So they will help in discovering but will not elevate your site or your pages in
importance. So, with that said, I wanted to touch a bit more about links. What are good
links, what are not such good links and so on? The properties of good links, or in a
way, they're very much like friends. You do not--they are attracted naturally. This again
comes from good contents, and from having people naturally say, "Hey, I like this page."
They tend to be from trustworthy, relevant and choosy sources, and I'll talk a little
bit more of the choosy part in a moment. They are similar to votes. They are given consciously,
intentionally and personally. So now that you know a bit about what are good links,
how do you get them? I've mentioned about creating that notable site. Okay, fine, fine,
the original content now that we know it. But another option is to participate thoughtfully
in communities. Now the people who are more lazy than you will misconstrue this and they
will say, "Yeah, I know how to participate. I'm just going to go and post in a bunch of
blogs saying, "Hi, check out my site. Thank you." You've all seen it. And we all hate
it. And let me tell you, Google is onto that. While it may have once offered some leg up,
I will tell you that we are very good at being able to recognize, this is not a quality link.
This desperate one is not a quality link. So okay that's--that's the "bad quality" participation.
Good quality participation is taking what you are an expert in. If you're on a travel
site and you know a lot about cruises and you're actually passionate about cruises,
participate in discussions. When someone says, "Hey, I don't even know is it worth upgrading
to one of the outside rooms. It's a lot more." And you can say, "Well, you know, here are
some considerations. There maybe a difference in your seasickness level, and actually we
found on this particular cruise lines being on one of the outside rooms is really worth
the money." These kinds of tips that you can offer both on your site and responsibly on
other sites, this makes you the respected expert. This gets you links, something else
that--okay, once you have that great site and you have that respect division. I've seen
again and again, where webmasters shoot themselves in the foot by not making their pages easy
to link to. So my sister is, I guess like many women, she's into shoes. I wanted to
send her a link to this really cool pair of shoes because she was heading off to a wedding.
And there was no actual link, any address where I could send her. All I could do is
say, "Amanda, go to this site." And then you click on the dress shoes, then you click on
women, then you see when you scroll over on this value scroll three or four over, oh,
come on. If I can barely tell my sister and if I can't link to it, how is that getting
page rank? How is that being shared? They're just shooting themselves in the foot. And
that applies a lot to Flash sites. Don't focus on beauty, focus on function. And then lastly
a couple--a couple of quick comments on links that aren't worth it, I've already hit upon
that a bit. If you have to beg or trade or buy or bargain, no, when we as Google see
someone that is selling links, you can darn well bet that those links are not going to
be worth even one rupee at all. If you find a directory that accepts absolutely anyone,
any site, how useful do you think that really is? If you're a user and you see a directory
and the sites are completely not vetted, it's not useful for users, it's not useful for
you as a link. If you run or on of your clients runs a directory, let me tell you a tip, make
it exclusive. Make it so that not that you have to pay necessarily but that you accept
only the best, the most important and relevant sites, then that can be worth something. Great
contents; it is original. Someone asked in the questions that were submitted beforehand.
"Hey, what do you think about article basis?" If an article can be found on this article
based on your site, and on 4,200 other sits around the web, how special do you think that
is? No, it is not. Because that is content you can find anywhere. If it is copied from
Wikipedia, if it is simply the reviews copied from Amazon, it really is not worth much.
And when I say that it is not worth much to users, it is not worth much for Linkjuice.
Compelling, you know it when you see it. People are likely to link to it and share it. And
my favorite part, accessible. That is when not only users can access it but also Googlebot
and Search Engines. So here--here are some thoughts on accessibility for you. Your site
is accessible when both users and Googlebots can load all the pages that you want them
to load, can navigate successfully from page to page, can see what's on each page, and
can understand the content. All of those are critical components in having more of your
site in Google, having it show up more in search results and having users being able
to use and link to your content. Users should be able to Bookmark. I already talked about
that with the shoes. One thing that people should keep in mind, too, when you Bookmark
that title of that page is what gets put in that person's Bookmark. If that title is simply
dress shoes, that's awful. It doesn't tell when you go back and you look at those Bookmarks,
what company was that. Was it an article about dress shoes? Was it my favorite company? I
don't know. It doesn't--that bookmark is--is useless. So this is yet another reason and
I'll talk more about that that you want your Title Tags to be excellent. This is one of
the Title Tags and I'm jumping ahead of myself. Focusing on optimizing responsibly your Title
Tags is one of the best things you can do. And you might laugh and say, "Oh, gosh. That's
just for like newbie SCO people." No, this is one of those tricks that helps. You want
to also be able to transact on your site. Can someone without JavaScript buy a product
on your site? Can they submit a form on the contact us. When I was doing some informal
audits of American Government websites, I was really impressed that one of the sites
actually openly said, "We as your government officials want to hear from you. Please send
us your questions and feedback." I thought, "Wow, that's great." And then just to test
for accessibility, I turned my JavaScript off on my browser. I couldn't submit the form.
I wrote the--I wrote the letter, couldn't send it. That--that is--imagine, not everyone
has JavaScript on and a lot of people don't have Flash on their browser, on their phone
and so on. You are missing out. You are missing on sales. You are missing traffic, the sustainable
traffic when your site is not accessible. This with accessibility is the one word you
want to absolutely click and tattoo on your head and that is text. Again, it sounds so
simple; Googlebot loves text, natural, original text. If you can trust this with putting your
company's name in a logo, okay, maybe you can use an Alt text, we can understand that.
It's still better to have the core information in text. If you have a chart, talk about it
in text. If you have a site that features some videos and you have a video page for
a message from you CEO, don't just have that video message from your CEO in that page,
talk about what that video means in text. So text is--as I've been getting out here
is the universal language. Flash, a text in Flash in JavaScript may not work for accessibility.
Now, Google has been getting better. You may have read that we actually entered into a
partnership with the Adobe to better understand the text and links within Flash. But we're
not perfect. We still have a long ways to go. So with all this talk about accessibility.
What are some specific ways in which you can test the accessibility of your sites? Look
at it in a mobile browser, whether that is a small phone with a really small screen browser
or an iPhone with a bigger screen or a Blackberry. I have a Blackberry for instance and I love
it. But I've been stunned at just how rudimentary their browser is. And how many challenges
that I face when I simply want to find out a movie time, when I want to find out a company's
address because I left my paper at home. If I cannot get such a basic simple info from
my cell phone, this is what we call website fail. Try also with a text-only browser perhaps
like Lynx or in your browser setting turn images and JavaScript off. Can you get the
information you want? Can you engage in transactions that you need to do? By transactions, I mean,
submit an email of--on a form, send a request, buy something and so on. The last part of
this test of accessibility is to have a friend, spouse, and colleague, give it a try and say,
"Hey, honey, I've just been upgrading my website. Can you please try and see if you can find
where my upcoming sale in this quarter for my company? Can you find where our latest
stock report is?" And if he or she can't find that, particularly on their phone or on their
browser, you have a problem. So from accessibility, the next step is to understanding. And before
we get to this, this is the mascot, the early mascot of Google. You may not have known that
but in a lot of our early internal documentation and internal code names, we love the lemur.
That actually is a picture I took of a lemur in Sweden that had jumped over my head and
was asking for a picture, or at least it looks that way. So now that you made your sites
accessible, how do you make it understandable? Title tags we've already mentioned and I'll
give an example in a bit. Photos, use of tags, these are the tags within your image, image
tag in HTML that explain what that image is about and why it's important. That helps Google
and for users that are on slow connections or have images turned off, it really helps
them as well. And as I already discussed particularly with regards to multimedia pages absolutely
add thoughtful context in a form of a commentary or description and text and so on. So I actually
was having a hard time finding some titles that I absolutely loved, but I want to at
least to make sure you understand when I'm talking about titles, that is exactly what
shows up in Google. That's just yet another reason why your Title Tag is so important.
What makes for a good title? They are specific to the page, not just to your company. They
mention, however, the company and organization and they are phrase-based, not a full sentence
and please, not just a huge string of keywords. In fact, actually, that's a sort of a good
larger piece of advice. Strings of keywords, generally not good. They're not good on your
page. They're not good hidden from your page. Okay, meta keywords, that's not going to hurt
you. That's fine. But your meta description and your title, strings of keywords in all
users and they don't do anything for you for Googlebot. Google has gotten really, really
good across languages, at understanding synonyms and essentially understanding concepts. So
don't get caught in a keyword trap. An example in my mind of what a good title would be,
would be for instance, restaurant name, serving true--in the Hyderabad area, lunch menu. So
that tells what it is with the company, I have a company and the restaurant name. Where
it is? A very short description of what they're doing and perhaps also, okay this is the lunch
menu or daily specials. So medium length, descriptive not obnoxious. So images, how
can you make the most of those? I've already talked about using Alt text. Here's the good
example, Googlebot with flowers. A bad example would be photo of Googlebot with red eyes
and silver body, blah, blah, blah, blah. The first one is more succinct, it tells you just
really in a short bit of what it's about. To give you another example if you have a
chart. A good, good title, a good Alt tag for that would be chart demonstrating doubling
and housing price is in the Bay area from 2000 to 2004. That is great because it gives
people the gist of that, of that graphic. In this case, we didn't really have to say
photo because it's pretty clear, it's a photo and by saying Googlebot with flowers it's
pretty obvious, it's not a chart or a logo. So you want to also use descriptive filenames.
When it comes out of your scanner or your camera, the filename is like img62595.jpeg.
That's not really useful for users when they're taking a look off-line, that's not useful
for Google. So rename it and don't worry too much about this, this is not critical but
it can be helpful if you make a short renaming that says, like in two or three, or four words
what that picture is. And you also, as I've mentioned before we're on to describing, give
context in actual text around the image. Again, don't be obnoxious. If you have a photo gallery,
you don't need five paragraphs on each photo, especially keywords stuff. But, if you have
a page that is only photos, it's going to be hard to rank that if there is no text.
And then, I think that most of you probably are thoughtful about this, but a friend of
mine when she was starting her business uploaded full resolution photos right out of a five
mega pixel camera and without, without compressing in a jpeg format and that was just hellish
for people to load. So just make a double check that you've optimize that. So, I've
actually, it looks like I've jumped ahead to myself a little bit. Here is also another
example where using smart page titles is helpful, particularly when you have a page that is
mostly photos, mostly videos, that page title also help us understand for video search,
image search, etc. what those are, what those may be about. And so now getting very much
towards the end, I'd like to leave you with some specific next steps. To make your pages
discoverable, please ensure that your site has both an HTML and a XML sitemap, and one
of the cool things about XML sitemaps by the way is not only does the main Google search
engineers that, but our fine fellow here Rajat who is going to talk to you about the custom
search engine will also remind you that the CSC also takes advantage of that same SiteMap.
When we're talking about sitemaps, also remember there are many different types, there's a
video, geo and so on. And you can get all of this information within our Webmaster Central.
Help your users access and understand your contents by creating the distinct and descriptive
Title Tags, annotating images with appropriate Alt text and then all of your media with thoughtful
surrounding context and summarizing text. On Webmaster Central, please visit and bookmark
the Webmaster Central homepage which is www.google.co.in/webmasters. Sign up for Webmaster Tools and verify your
site. And I know that many of you may think, "Okay, okay, I've already done that." But
I'm not going to pick on specific people, but from the survey, I know there are actually
many of you have not yet done that. And I know it's because you are waiting to hear
about it, about it today and are going to go home and do it tonight. And then subscribe
to our Official Webmaster Blog. We now have an option were you can actually get emails
from it, of course that you guys are certainly welcome and able to use it and our Assess
Reader with it as well. We are one of the few, the proud Google Blogs that has open
comments, and so, well, we ask that you don't post unrelated issues or questions on each
item. We very much welcome your questions and feedback that are specific to each post
that we make and we really do read all the comments. When we don't address them directly
within the comments and you don't get a reply, please don't take that personally. We are
very often using those questions, excuse me--to answer related--as we the Googlers. But there
have been amazing experts really, really smart Webmasters, SCO's, who have also volunteered
their time and helped other people. And by the way, as a little bit of a selfish secret,
you may have already realized one of the best ways to establish your expertise, your thoughtfulness
and your intelligence when it comes to Google search is to also be an active, smart participant
in our forum because you get that profile ink, don't be thinking about that in terms
of juice or pay drink or any that stuff, that's not the issue here. That link is saying, is
what people will notice, "Wow, you know that one guy, that one woman, they've been so thoughtful
and helpful to me. Maybe I should just hire them. Maybe I could have them build my site."
So whether it's on our forum or other forums, being that thoughtful expert is so, so useful.
As I think many of you have already figured out. And lastly on that forum, there is a
perennial set of threads called Introduce Yourself. And also, this is one of my favorites,
were you just mention your name, what site you're with and this is a great way to become
involved as part of that community. And with that set, I will close with this picture that
I actually--I don't know who took it but I have to give credit to a few of my fellow
Googler folks. Gayle Lockman, Bob Day and Sean Egan who aren't with us this afternoon--this
morning but they built this out of logos and I just, I thought it was really cool.