FFA Poultry Judging: Class 4 - Ready to Cook Carcasses


Uploaded by ugaExtension on 23.02.2012

Transcript:
>>This is FFA Poultry Judging: Class 4 – Ready to Cook Carcasses
>>Class 4 is a grading class of 10 ready to cook chicken
and/or turkey carcasses and/or parts.
>>Carcasses will be shown here, but if parts were to be used
they would be judged based on the same criteria.
>>Chicken carcasses will weigh between 2 and 6 pounds.
Turkey carcasses will weigh between 6 and 16 pounds.
>>Carcasses and parts are to be graded
based on the latest USDA standards;
USDA quality grades are A, B and C;
NG designates non-gradable.
>>The following factors are used to determine
the grade of the chicken.
>>For conformation, moderate deformities
in the breastbone, back or legs or wings
result in a Grade B carcass.
Seriously curved or crooked parts
or abnormal parts result in a Grade C conformation.
>>For fleshing, well fleshed birds are considered A quality.
Moderately fleshed birds are considered B quality.
And poorly flesh birds are considered C quality.
>>"A" quality birds should have a well-developed layer of fat,
especially between heavy feather tracks.
A "B" quality bird should have a sufficient fat layer,
especially on the breast and legs.
And a "C" quality bird would be lacking in fat
covering all parts of the carcass.
>>The first carcass we will look at
is a Grade A carcass.
The rules say that this carcass should have no cuts or tears on
the skin greater than 1/4-inch in length
on the breasts or legs and should have no evidence
of broken bones or more than one disjoint.
The student should rotate the chicken in the shackle
and carefully examine it for defects.
>>The amount of exposed flesh allowed
depends on the weight of the carcass.
For a carcass that weighs between 2 and 6 pounds,
as you see here, on the breast
and legs a 1/4-inch is the maximum
allowed in order for the carcass to be a Grade A.
Elsewhere, it can be 1 1/2-inches.
For a 6 to 16 pound carcass, 1/2-inch of exposed flesh
may be allowed on the breast and legs
and 2 inches elsewhere to be considered Grade A.
>>This is an evisceration cut and is perfectly acceptable
on a Grade A carcass.
>>While the student is not allowed to touch
the carcass during a contest, they should thoroughly inspect
the wings for any evidence of a defect.
Also, it’s important to carefully examine
the saddle of the carcass at the hips to ensure
that no cuts in the skin are present.
This is an example of cut or torn skin on the breast
of the carcass.
This cut is larger than 1/4-inch in length,
so the carcass is downgraded to a B Grade carcass.
This is an example of cut or torn skin on the leg
of the carcass.
This cut is larger than 1/4-inch in length,
so the carcass is downgraded to a B Grade carcass.
This is an example of cut or torn skin on the leg
of the carcass that is larger than 1/3 of the part,
so this makes the carcass a C Grade.
This is an example of cut or torn skin on the breast
of the carcass that is larger than 1/3 of the part
so this makes the carcass a C Grade.
>>The bottom cut is an example of cut or torn skin
on a body part other than the breast or legs.
The rules say that if the cut is less than 1 1/2-inches
in length the carcass is still an "A."
>>The top cut on the back of this carcass
is greater than 1 1/2-inches as shown by the ruler on the right.
My thumb is marking the 1 1/2-inch mark.
This defect makes the carcass a B Grade.
>>For discolorations for a bird
between 2 and 6 pounds, the discoloration must be
between 1 and 2 inches in size for an A Grade carcass,
2 and 3 inches in size for a B Grade carcass
and no limit for a C Grade carcass.
>>For a 6 to 16 pound bird, the discolorations that
are between 1 1/2-inches and 2 1/2-inches
are A Grade carcass,
discolorations between 2 1/2-inches and 4 inches
would be a B Grade carcass
and is no limit for a C Grade carcass.
>>A Grade A carcass may have the wing tips or flippers removed
and the tail may be removed even with the body of the carcass.
>>On this carcass, we will look at disjoints.
The rules say that a carcass may have one disjoint
and still remain a Grade A carcass.
Just as with broken, non-protruding bones
it is important for students to carefully examine
the area around the disjoint to see whether there is skin
covering the disjointed bone.
As the contest wears on, the skin may become transparent
and appear as though the bone is protruding out of the skin.
>>In order for the chicken to be downgraded
to a B Grade carcass, two disjoints must be present.
Usually in a contest, a carcass with a disjointed leg
will be hung by one hock so that the leg that is disjointed
can be seen at a perpendicular angle to the carcass.
Also, the way the wing hangs in comparison to the other wing
is an easy way to tell that the wing is disjointed.
This is a Grade B carcass.
In the next section, we will look at a carcass
with a broken, unexposed or non-protruding bone in the leg.
It is important for students to realize that during a contest
if chickens hang for long periods of time
the skin will dry out and become transparent,
making it appear as though the bone is protruding.
It is important to examine the area carefully
to determine if the skin is covering the broken bone.
Next we look at a broken, unexposed
or non-protruding bone in the wing of the carcass.
The way that a student can tell if the wing bones
are broken is that the wing will appear
to be curved instead of flat.
Comparing the broken, curved wing to an unbroken,
flat wing on the other side of the carcass
is an excellent way to tell whether or not the wing
has been broken and can help the student
to easily distinguish between the two.
This is an example of a broken and exposed
or protruding bone on a leg of the carcass.
Because leg bones on chickens are large
this defect is usually very easy to see.
This is a broken and exposed or
protruding bone on the wing of the carcass.
Because the wing bones on chickens are very small
this defect can be easily overlooked by students,
so they should be careful to examine the inside
of the wings for broken, exposed bones.
What if the carcass has one disjoint
and one broken, non-protruding bone?
It is downgraded to a Grade B carcass
as shown here.
When evaluating a carcass for tail cuts,
students should become familiar with where
the leg bone attaches to the backbone of the carcass.
This is called the hip joint and can be felt by probing
the back of the carcass.
This is the reference point
to use when determining grade on carcasses with back cuts.
My thumb is marking the location
of the hip joint in this instance.
>>Another way to determine where the hip joint is,
is to look for the oyster muscles.
These are the two bumps on either side of the spine.
The hip joint is located just beyond those bumps
>>toward the tail point between the hip joint
and the base of the tail.
Keep in mind, I said
the base of the tail is located.
A tail cut that is less than half way to the hip joint,
as shown here, is a Grade B carcass.
Again, a tail cut that is less than half way
to the hip joint is a Grade B carcass.
Now for a Grade C carcass, the tail cut must extend
between half way to the hip joint and beyond.
The cut that I make here on this carcass extends
all the way to the hip joint.
This is a Grade C carcass.
The next carcass defect we want to look at is missing parts.
For wings, if half of the wing is removed,
this part is also known as the wing flat,
then the carcass is downgraded to a B Grade carcass.
If the entire wing is removed then the carcass is downgraded
to a C Grade carcass, as shown here.
Although not mentioned in your manual,
trim is used as a criterion for USDA grading.
If the part has been trimmed to the thickness of a nickel
or 1/8-inch or less then it is a B Grade carcass.
If the flesh of the breast or leg has been trimmed
to a thickness of more than 1/8-inch
or the thickness of a nickel
then the carcass is a C Grade.
For freezing defects, slight darkening
on the back or on the drumstick
would be considered an A Grade carcass.
Overall bright appearance, occasional pock marks
due to drying, occasional small areas of clear,
pinkish or reddish colored ice
all would be considered Grade A.
For Grade B carcasses, they may lack brightness,
few pock marks due to drying and may have moderate areas
showing a layer of clear, pinkish or reddish colored ice
and for a Grade C carcass numerous pock marks
and large dried areas.
© 2012 University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences