GTAC 2007: Huggins & Stewart - Selenium-RC Vs WebDriver


Uploaded by Google on 24.08.2007

Transcript:

MALE SPEAKER 1: Great.
Fabulous.
MALE SPEAKER 2: Go!
MALE SPEAKER 1: We're going to do a duet.

Ebony and--
[LAUGHTER]
So what we're going to do is quickly run through what sucks
about our favorite web testing framework and then we'll tell
you what's great about it, and why you should
think about using it.
MALE SPEAKER 2: Representing Web Driver,
representing Selenium.
MALE SPEAKER 1: We were thinking we might do
it the other way.
So what sucks most about WebDriver is it's a complete
dog to write, to support a new browser, because you've got to
write all the native code.
And frankly, that takes a gazillion years to write.
MALE SPEAKER 2: All right.
What sucks about Selenium.
Their limitations to the same origin policies.
It requires really hack-y work arounds for us.
It's all support, pop-up handling,
and cross-site scripting.
Go faster.
MALE SPEAKER 1: Another thing that sucks is the IE driver
can completely wipe out the JVM.

MALE SPEAKER 2: What sucks about Selenium.
Most of the competition, including WebDriver, are
native browser drivers and provide more in depth control
than Selenium can into the internals of the browser.
Selenium, not so much.
MALE SPEAKER 1: It only supports Java, at the moment.
MALE SPEAKER 2: Active development is going on, but
there are very infrequent releases.
The last official release was November, 2006.
So what the--?

MALE SPEAKER 1: Great.
So, it's really hard to extend.
For example if, you want new selectors to be able to select
elements, that's hard to do, because you've got to write it
in multiple different languages.
MALE SPEAKER 2: In Selenium Remote-Control, Safari support
really sucks.
MALE SPEAKER 1: Should we do the pluses?
One more negative?
The IE driver is impossibly slow.
It'll get better one day, but right now.
MALE SPEAKER 2: The last thing that sucks about Selenium, no
jelly babies.

All right.
Now onto the rocks.
MALE SPEAKER 1: So obviously, it's not all bad.
There are some really great things.

The nicest thing about WebDriver is the small,
comprehensible API, that's frankly gorgeous.

MALE SPEAKER 2: Selenium now has multiple browser support,
Firefox, i.e.
Safari, Conquer, and Opera, at least in core, and most of
them in RC.
MALE SPEAKER 1: I can solve problems that Selenium has no
hope of every solving, because I can use the awesome power of
the native operating system.
MALE SPEAKER 2: Selenium now has multiple language support,
Java, C-sharp, Ruby, Pearl, Python and PHP.

MALE SPEAKER 1: By bearing in mind the concepts of speed and
safety and the fact that your tests evolve, WebDriver gives
you the ability to make conscious trade-offs that you
just can't make with Selenium.
MALE SPEAKER 2: Selenium is popular.
There are 38 jobs on Monster.com that actually
require Selenium inexperience.

Quantity does not equal quality, thou, right?
It has its own Wiki page, and there's
an active user community.
MALE SPEAKER 1: What's a user community?
MALE SPEAKER 2: I don't know.
I never go there.
MALE SPEAKER 1: One of the really nice things WebDriver
is the fact that it's a tiny stack.
There's no server process that you need to be
aware of or start up.
And it's self contained.
It's just dropping jaws and libraries into the right place
in your path.
MALE SPEAKER 2: The Selenium IDE plug-in
for Firefox is great.
It's kind of a record playback tool.
It's really great for boot strapping test creation, by
recording a little simpler regression tests or
recording or close.
MALE SPEAKER 1: I am aware that somewhere in the room
there's a 500 pound gorilla, and I've made it really easy
view to my greats to a nicer API, through providing an
implementation of the Selenium one.
MALE SPEAKER 2: The Selenium IDE.
MALE SPEAKER 1: I love you, man.
MALE SPEAKER 2: The Selenium IDE for Firefox can easily
translate the core table tests into real programming
languages, like Java, C-sharp, Pearl, Python, Revere, PHP.
[LAUGHTER]
MALE SPEAKER 1: This sucks, man.

MALE SPEAKER 2: I only have one more.
MALE SPEAKER 1: One of the really nice things is it's
actively maintained and it also supports Ajax
and your web apps.
MALE SPEAKER 2: And the last thing that rocks about
Selenium, you can put it on a massive scaled out grid.

We're going to do a duel.
So everyone count to three.
MALE SPEAKER 1: That would be nice.
One.
Give us a second.
One.
Two.
Three.
Thank you everybody.
Now does anybody remember what Alan said earlier on?

OK, lightening talk speakers, we're on the rear guard here.