DRIVE CENTRAL - JAN 31 2012


Uploaded by drive on 30.01.2012

Transcript:
[MUSIC PLAYING]
MIKE SPINELLI: Hey, it's Mike Spinelli on Drive Central, the
show where you'll find out all the things going
on Drive this week.
Hit us up @DriveTV on Twitter, or leave us comments in the
comments section below.
Because we read them and even the ones where you make fun of
us, which is fine.
Anyway, on Tuned.
This week, Matt Farah trekked up to Washington State to
visit Art and Craig Morrison to find out how to make old
muscle cars perform like new cars.
Check out this clip with Matt.
MALE SPEAKER: OK, Matt.
This is the tool that we build our early Corvette frame, the
C1, the '53 to '62.
This is the identical frame that I have
underneath my '60 Corvette.
And the way these things work, the fixtures, is you notice
there's a place, an attaching point for virtually every part
on the frame--
from the read body mount, to the coil over mounts, sway bar
amounts, upper control arm for the rear, and so on.
Virtually everything that attaches to this chassis bolts
to the fixture as a unit.
MIKE SPINELLI: That's Tuned on Drive.
Every Monday.
Write it down, check it out, and watch it.
In his latest road trip, Alex Roy tries to find out why
Detroit isn't quite the bombed out dystopia
everyone thinks it is.
And he even found a street where all the houses are
painted in polka dots, thanks to all the crack dealers.
Why is that?
Let's let Alex explain exactly why.
ALEX ROY: And that car will be something unbelievable.
It's that.

MIKE SPINELLI: That's Live and Let Drive every Tuesday, right
here, on Drive.
Now as we found out last week on Drive Central, Chris Harris
found his way into a sort of Whitman sampler of homologated
rally cars from the glory days of Group B. So let's check out
another clip of turbo charged, all-wheel drive awesomeness
from this week.

That's Chris Harris on Cars, Wednesdays on Drive.
This week on Road Testament, we're taking a look at the
insane world of auto auctions, where millions of dollars in
cars change hands every 11 seconds.
That's not true.
But here to talk about the One-percenter madness that
does go on, is Charles Mosely, special
correspondent to Drive.
And Charles, you just got back from the auction
scene in what is it?
Phoenix.
CHARLES MOSELY: Phoenix, Scottsdale, yeah.
MIKE SPINELLI: So what's going on down there?
CHARLES MOSELY: $186 million.
Six auctions.
Over 1,000 cars.
MIKE SPINELLI: Not exactly the economic malaise that we're
led to assume?
CHARLES MOSELY: No.
Everyone is doing amazingly well, actually.
Surprisingly so.
MIKE SPINELLI: So what kind of stuff goes on down there?
I mean, if you watch the coverage, you see the barkers
and they're trying to get the guys to pay more for the cars
at auction.
What's going on?
CHARLES MOSELY: Well actually, it's interesting.
All the auctions are different.
Some do do the patter, barker, bababababababa.
And some have great English humor.
We'll talk about that in the show a little bit.
MIKE SPINELLI: Cool And what are some of the cars that went
for really big money this year?
CHARLES MOSELY: The highest top seller was a 1955 Mercedes
300SL alloy coupe for over $5 million.
MIKE SPINELLI: The alloy coupe is the one that's lighter than
the regular SL right?
CHARLES MOSELY: Exactly.
MIKE SPINELLI: And how much did you say?
CHARLES MOSELY: Over five.
Well, close to five.
4.65.
MIKE SPINELLI: That's amazing money.
CHARLES MOSELY: And there was a California Spyder
that went for 2.9.
MIKE SPINELLI: Wow.
CHARLES MOSELY: Yeah.
There was a Tucker that went for 2.6.
MIKE SPINELLI: A Tucker?
From the--
the safety car?
CHARLES MOSELY: Real Tucker, yeah.
MIKE SPINELLI: Real Tucker.
What about muscle cars and stuff like that?
CHARLES MOSELY: Muscle cars did very well.
But they're not doing as well as they did
maybe three years ago.
But the decline is not been very much.
And for a really good car, you're gonna
get really good money.
MIKE SPINELLI: So real rare ones are still-- so it's not
like you're going to get--
you know, the four-door Tempest is going to be
[INAUDIBLE]--
CHARLES MOSELY: No, but they do sell a lot of them there.
So while, yes you can spend $5 million for a car, you can
also spend $10,000 and walk away with
a pretty cool classic.
MIKE SPINELLI: So what about the overall scene?
Is it like coke and hookers?
Because I mean, there's a lot of money
flying around down there.
CHARLES MOSELY: I know nothing about coke and hookers.
MIKE SPINELLI: Of course not.
CHARLES MOSELY: It is actually a very amazing
environment to be in.
Because there are very high-end, garden party,
incredibly wealthy people.
And then you go to the Barrett Jackson Circus and you see
everything.
MIKE SPINELLI: You said something before about there
was a silicone--
CHARLES MOSELY: I've heard.
I didn't say it.
I've heard people call it Silicone
Saturday at Barrett Jackson.
MIKE SPINELLI: Because of the trophy wives?
CHARLES MOSELY: Exactly.
MIKE SPINELLI: When rich guys are out buying cars, you get
what you get.
CHARLES MOSELY: And even not rich guys, just everyday guys
bringing their wives around and walking around.
MIKE SPINELLI: Well, that's the thing.
What about some of the more affordable stuff.
I mean, you can buy a $5,000 something?
CHARLES MOSELY: $2,000 somethings.
MIKE SPINELLI: OK, cool.
CHARLES MOSELY: As little as.
One of the auctions is Silver Auctions, which isn't actually
in Scottsdale, it's a little outside.
And there are very, very inexpensive cars there.
They're not great cars.
But they're very inexpensive.
MIKE SPINELLI: Cool.
Cool.
So we're going to find out more on Road Testament.
CHARLES MOSELY: Right.
MIKE SPINELLI: This week.
CHARLES MOSELY: Yep.
MIKE SPINELLI: Cool man.
Thanks for coming by.
And that's it for Drive Central today.
Watch Drive, as you can't see on, @DriveTV on Twitter or
leave comments in the comments below.
Thanks a lot.
See you later.
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