Felicia Day & Amy Okuda Get Their Ghost On


Uploaded by geekandsundry on 19.11.2012

Transcript:

AMY OKUDA: Hi, everyone.
Welcome to the Flog.
I'm not Felicia Day.
And you know how I know that?
I don't really know where I'm going with that.
So whatever.
Anyways, I'm Amy Okuda, and I am guest
hosting the Flog today.
And we have a lot to cover, so let's just get to this Trio
Mio thing, whatever that means.
Trio Mio?
That makes no sense.
It just rhymes.
I don't get it.
Whatever.
Let's just go, I guess.

Number one is Taylor Swift!
Yeah, Taylor Swift.
I said it.
Shut the hell up.
She's awesome.
Anyways, her album "Red" came out October
22nd, and it's so good.
There are 16 songs on there, and there's a whole
diversity of sounds.
Some are pop, others are kind of country and the other ones
are pop, and then there's some other songs that are pop-y.
So yeah.
I don't give a damn if you don't like her.
Because she's awesome and I love her.
Number two is John Green.
He is a young adult writer, and a real-life nerd.
I actually fell in love with him when my sister let me
borrow one of his books, "An Abundance of Katherines." And
since then, I've basically read all of his books.
I'm reading "Will Grayson, Will Grayson" right now, and
it's really, really good.
I really love his books, because even though he's a
young adult author he doesn't really dumb things down.
It makes it easy for you to relate to them, without
cringing how stupid you were when you were these
character's ages.
He writes all these really endearingly honest and
vulnerable characters that say [BLEEP]
that you wouldn't actually really want to say.
But he does it without getting too heavy-handed and preachy.
So yeah.
Oh!
And he watches "The Guild," so he has really good taste.
He even Tweeted me once.
I almost got a heart attack.
Number three is The Product Farm.
It's this cool website, where if you have an idea for
something, or wanted something that no one ever makes, these
guys will freaking make it for you!
Look.
I got this wine sippy cup for my friend Robin Thorsen, who's
on "The Guild--" oh, shoot.
I was supposed to give this to her for her wrap gift for
season six.
It's still here.
Oh!
Christmas!
Yeah.
Christmas.
Robin, don't watch this.
All right.
So this week's segment, Felicia and I
get our "Ghost" on.
You know, like the movie "Ghost?" Because, you know,
they made pottery?
We're going to make pottery.
Oh, no But we don't--
Ugh.
It's weird.
Gross.
Anyways.
I don't know.
Whatever.
Just watch the damn segment.

FELICIA DAY: I'm here at the Bitter Root Ceramic Studio,
with my friend Amy Okuda, and we are going to go learn how
to make a pot.
AMY OKUDA: Whoo.
FELICIA DAY: Are you excited?
AMY OKUDA: Kind of, yeah.
I've never done it before.
Very excited.
So excited!
FELICIA DAY: Yay!
Let's go!
OK, Debra.
What are we making today?
DEBRA D'AMATO: We're going to aim for a bowl.
First thing is you need clay.
So I've taken these pieces, and they're already wedged and
ready to go.
FELICIA DAY: What is wedging?
What just happened?
DEBRA D'AMATO: Wedging is basically taking the air out.
FELICIA DAY: So we're going to get the air out of the clay,
Basically
DEBRA D'AMATO: We're going to-- just put one leg--
It'd kind of a rocking motion.
And you're not going to push really hard, but you're just
going to push a little bit.
FELICIA DAY: Ooh.
AMY OKUDA: Mine's not moving.
Make a little turn, and then push again.
FELICIA DAY: OK.
DEBRA D'AMATO: And the idea is to get-- this is the easier
way of wedging.
FELICIA DAY: OK.
AMY OKUDA: How come mine's not moving?
FELICIA DAY: Because you're tiny and weak.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Uh-oh.
I have a little skid mark.
AMY OKUDA: Oh god, mine's so good.
FELICIA DAY: Hey, Debra, come on.
AMY OKUDA: It's so good!
FELICIA DAY: All right.
Good.
That was fun.
DEBRA D'AMATO: All right.
So let's take these balls of clay.
And we've got a couple wheels set up for you over there.
FELICIA DAY: Spank it.
DEBRA D'AMATO: OK, ready?
FELICIA DAY: I like the sound.
AMY OKUDA: OK, I don't want this one anyway.
I messed it up.
FELICIA DAY: You put your hands all over it.
AMY OKUDA: We put all of our hands all over it.
FELICIA DAY: All right, this one's fine.
Let's go.
AMY OKUDA: Let's get dirty.
FELICIA DAY: Let's get dirty.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Let's get dirty.
Ready?
Just one drop of water and smoosh it around.
If you have too much water, your clay is going to just
slide right off the wheel.
So you want to have just enough to make it stick.
So you're just going to aim for the bullseye.
FELICIA DAY: I can do this.
I'm two inches away.
I can do it.
Yes!
DEBRA D'AMATO: Now get your hands wet, and dribble a
little bit of water on your pot, and you'll feel.
Just touch your clay.
AMY OKUDA: This is weird!
FELICIA DAY: Look at your face!
DEBRA D'AMATO: So the first thing we're
going to do is center.
You ready?
FELICIA DAY: OK.
DEBRA D'AMATO: If your clay starts to feel sticky--
FELICIA DAY: It's sticky now.
[INAUDIBLE]
OK.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Get your hands wet again.
AMY OKUDA: I think my hands are burning.
FELICIA DAY: No, no!
You've got to make it wetter again!
DEBRA D'AMATO: Lock your elbows into your thighs--
FELICIA DAY: Hut, hut!
DEBRA D'AMATO: And keep you thighs nice and tight.
Tighten your belly muscles.
And just keep your shoulders still.
Elbows in your thighs.
Elbows in your thighs.
FELICIA DAY: Oh, it's so much work!
Ah, Debra!
DEBRA D'AMATO: OK, look--
AMY OKUDA: This isn't as fun as I thought it
was going to be.
FELICIA DAY: Debra, why am I dancing.
AMY OKUDA: Oh, I did it, look!
I'm a natural potter.
FELICIA DAY: I'm not kidding.
You're not dancing.
I'm dancing.
I'm trying.
I'm not trying to mess it up.
DEBRA D'AMATO: I think I might have to sit there for just a
minute and help you get started.
FELICIA DAY: Are you serious?
I'm that bad?
AMY OKUDA: I have a question.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Yes.
AMY OKUDA: So now what do the advanced people do?
FELICIA DAY: OK, I need to get back up to your level, OK Amy?
DEBRA D'AMATO: I'll tell you what.
My teacher told me perfection was for the gods.
So I never aim for perfection.
I figure that that's OK.
FELICIA DAY: When I have personal problems, can I come
talk to you?
Because you are so zen.
You're making me feel good about everything.
I think you put me on the beginner wheel because I do
not go as fast as Amy.
Brace your elbows!
I'm an expert.
AMY OKUDA: My arms are jiggling.
FELICIA DAY: No!
Brace it!
Brace it, Amy!
DEBRA D'AMATO: We're going to open this up with the double
thumb method.
You're going to take your thumbs, and you're going to go
right to the center, and make a little depression.
FELICIA DAY: OK.
Look at that.
DEBRA D'AMATO: This is the start of making the bowl.
FELICIA DAY: Oh.
AMY OKUDA: So we have to go a lot further than this.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Right.
FELICIA DAY: Get in there!
Ahh!
AMY OKUDA: We're going to finger this bowl.
DEBRA D'AMATO: All right.
Now, again--
FELICIA DAY: We're mud wrestling, Amy.
We're mud wrestling.
Look, guys.
AMY OKUDA: Let's thumb wrestle.
FELICIA DAY: Thumb wrestle.
Ooh.
We're like in a country bar.
OK.
DEBRA D'AMATO: I'm just making it tall.
FELICIA DAY: Oh, yeah.
Ooh this is fun.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Ready, ready.
Stop.
Perfect.
AMY OKUDA: Oh, look!
FELICIA DAY: Yeah!
DEBRA D'AMATO: Stop!
Stop!
AMY OKUDA: Ahh!
DEBRA D'AMATO: Yours looks really great.
AMY OKUDA: Does it?
Thanks.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Yes, it does.
FELICIA DAY: She's just fishing for compliments.
I hope she's transparent by now.
DEBRA D'AMATO: The next step we're going to do is we're
going to pull the sides.
This is going to make our piece a little bit taller.
FELICIA DAY: OK.
DEBRA D'AMATO: And then we'll shape them.
FELICIA DAY: We're trying to make it bigger and taller.
DEBRA D'AMATO: That's good.
Stop.
FELICIA DAY: Oh, god.
Debra, something happened.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Just feel right there.
FELICIA DAY: I don't know where to press.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Let the clay come to you.
There you go.
FELICIA DAY: Another Debra t-shirt.
I'm not trying to be bad.
People are like, she's messing it up on purpose.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Accidentaly on purpose.
AMY OKUDA: Hooray!
DEBRA D'AMATO: And there is your first bowl.
FELICIA DAY: Let's just back up a bit.
There is something seriously wrong with my bowl,
conceptually.
DEBRA D'AMATO: Truthfully, these are two really good
first attempts--
AMY OKUDA: That?
DEBRA D'AMATO: --at throwing a pot.
AMY OKUDA: Really?
DEBRA D'AMATO: Honestly.
AMY OKUDA: So that's what it's called. "Throwing a pot?"
DEBRA D'AMATO: Yes.
AMY OKUDA: So if someone's like, what did you do today?
I just say, I threw a pot.
FELICIA DAY: So you're going to let this
dry out for a week.
And then--
DEBRA D'AMATO: See, it's very moist right now.
It still has a lot of water.
It's going to take a while for it to get dried out.
Then it goes in the kiln.
And when it comes out of the kiln--
[POT DINGS]
DEBRA D'AMATO: So once it's bisqued, then we'll
put glaze on it.
And then after it's fired again, then
the glaze is on it.
FELICIA DAY: Ooh, cool.
DEBRA D'AMATO: This actually is going to look really
interesting once it's glazed.
You'll be surprised.
FELICIA DAY: You're the sweetest person I've ever met.
AMY OKUDA: Might end up like [INAUDIBLE].
DEBRA D'AMATO: Yeah, you know.
FELICIA DAY: I hate you.
Well, thank you so much, Debra.
I really appreciate it.
DEBRA D'AMATO: You're welcome.
It was a pleasure.
I can't wait to come by next week and get our bowls.
Yes, do.
AMY OKUDA: Thank you.
DEBRA D'AMATO: You're welcome.
FELICIA DAY: Bye!
AMY OKUDA: So Felicia is auctioning off her whatever
this is for charity.
And I guess, since it's for charity, I'll
auction mine off, too.
It's way better.
Looks like a bowl and it's green.
Yeah.
I don't even--
I'll just put this back down.
Which way does--
Oh, whatever.
All right!
Moving on to the Question of Note.
It comes from Lucy, who asked me, "if you could have your
own personal spaceship, what would it be named and what
cool features would it have?" Great question.

Hey, Lucy.
If I had a spaceship, it would be named Lola's Palace, and
would be a luxury liner for space.
Lola's my baby, and she would be my first mate.
There would be treat dispensers found on every
deck, the ship would come equipped with robots that
would walk her whenever she wanted.
And any time a hostile alien race attacked, the ship's
defences would project a massive image of her cuteness
that would pacify all the bad guys, causing them to fall to
their knees and rub her little tummy in worship.
Thanks for writing!
Blah, blah, blah, Amy.
OK.
So that's it.
Thanks for watching.
And make sure you subscribe to Geek & Sundry, and watch "The
Guild." Watch "the Guild," and happy Thanksgiving to you!
OK.
Am I done?
Can I go?
I'm leaving.
Come on, Lola.
I'm taking the sign, too.